Do your enlargements have the snap and brilliancy they should have, or do they appear to be flat and foggy?

We hear a great many complaints of the latter nature during the winter months, especially from those parts of the country where soft coal or natural gas is burned for fuel.

The trouble is not with the paper but with the lens used for enlarging. If you are having such trouble you will find upon examining your lens carefully that a smoky film has formed on its surfaces.

If its outer surfaces are kept carefully cleaned, the film of discoloration will be found on the inner surfaces and these must be cleaned if the trouble is to be avoided.

If the inner surfaces must be cleaned, the greatest care should be used to see that the lens cells are properly replaced, otherwise the lens may be rendered useless.

While a lens surface may be cleaned with a soft cloth which has been dampened with alcohol, precautions should be taken to prevent any alcohol from getting between lens elements that are cemented together. The alcohol will dissolve the cement and make it necessary to send the lens to the factory for repairs.

Portrait Film Negative, Artura Print By M. A. Grady Seattle, Wash.

Portrait Film Negative, Artura Print By M. A. Grady Seattle, Wash.

When the lens has been properly cleaned there will be no further trouble with your enlargements. They will be snappy and brilliant provided you keep your lens clean. It only takes a few weeks for it to become dirty again, so it should be kept clean at all times.

Naturally the cold damp weather of winter, the smoke, the gas fumes and the changes of temperature producing the conditions we have mentioned, will affect one lens the same as another.

Your portrait or view or copying lens will be affected in the same way, with the result that your negatives will be lacking in the brilliancy they should rightfully have.

Compare the transparent edges of your negatives with the most transparent shadows of your negative image and you can quickly tell whether you are getting fog in your camera or in the dark room.

If the edges of the negative are perfectly clear and the rest of the negative shows a slight veil of fog, look for the trouble in the camera. The lens needs cleaning or there is a leak in the camera itself.

If the entire negative shows a veil of fog you will find the trouble in the dark room. Either your light is not safe or your developer is producing the fog. You can locate the trouble by loading and unloading your holder and developing your test negative in absolute darkness.

If you still have fog, try a different developer or add bromide. There is nothing quite so satisfactory as clean, snappy negatives or prints free from every trace of fog, and you can make them if you will observe proper precautions.

The best ways of attracting attention to your advertising are by using white space or pictures. On page 5 is a good example of the use of white space as an attention getter. On page 26 the same copy is used with a picture. Let us send you this cut. Then use both methods of advertising for the June graduates.

Portrait Film Negative, Artura Print By M. A. Grady Seattle, Wash.

Portrait Film Negative, Artura Print By M. A. Grady Seattle, Wash.

Portrait Film Negative, Artura Print By M.A. Grady Seattle, Wash.

Portrait Film Negative, Artura Print By M.A. Grady Seattle, Wash.