SOME photographers do quite a good business in enlargements, but, on the other hand, there are many who do not make half-a-dozen in three months. One man will tell you, with a happy smile, that enlargements bring in a big part of his profits and another will tell you, with a doleful countenance, that enlargements won't sell. You will often find the two types in the same town, appealing to the same public. It is obvious, therefore, that their trade is governed by their own particular views.

When some men want to make an enlargement they have to clean a window, move some old hypo barrels, make a new reflector, rig up an improvised easel, mix up some special developer and do several other things, before they can make a start. They are the men who cannot possibly do much business in enlargements.

The men who look upon enlargements simply as large prints, however, and are prepared to make their pictures by projection any size their customers may require - whose work-rooms are equipped for this class of business and can turn out large projection prints just as easily and quickly as contact prints - these are the men who do the brisk business in enlargements.

There is no reason to continue calling a print an enlargement simply because it is larger than the negative from which it is made. It is much better to call it a print made by projection. As soon as photographers get accustomed to this idea, they will increase their business enormously.

Portrait Film Negative, Vitava Print From the Kansas City National Convention Exhibit.

Portrait Film Negative, Vitava Print From the Kansas City National Convention Exhibit.

And it is often said that it's a poor rule that won't work both ways. We recently heard of a commercial photographer who made a large portion of his prints by projection with the Eastman Projection Printer.

Instead of mentioning projected prints, however, he showed contact prints for proofs and with a rubber stamp marked the back of the print about as follows: "This is a reduced proof, made this size for the sake of convenience and economy. The prints we will deliver will be 11 x 14 inches in size." It was just another way of getting away from the idea of enlargements and the photographer found it very satisfactory.

There really does not need to be an excuse for projected prints, however, for if they are properly projected on a paper of good quality they will be the equal of contact prints and will sell as readily.

As to the psychology of selling large prints from small negatives there is little need for study. In our exhibit at the recent convention we displayed a number of projected prints, about 9 x 15 inches in size, made on Vitava Etching Brown paper. They were nicely mounted as one would mount prints made by contact and practically every photographer who saw them asked if they were contact prints or enlargements.

The public will judge a print as it appears. If it is a projected print it is just as good and as lasting and as satisfactory as any other print.

The advantage of the projected print from the selling point of view is that you can sell one or two or three of these prints, in addition to your regular order, and make an excellent profit and your charge can approximate that made for duplicate orders for that size of print.

Why not sell large prints?

In the April Studio Light an error was made in the price of The New Vogue folder in the Taprell Loomis advertisement. This is corrected in the advertisement on page 32.

Portrait Film Negative, Vitava Print From the Kansas City National Convention Exhibit.

Portrait Film Negative, Vitava Print From the Kansas City National Convention Exhibit.

If You Make Large Prints You Will Sell Large Print StudioLightMagazine1922 140Portrait Film Negative, Portrait Bromide Print By Manning Bros. Detroit, Mich.

Portrait Film Negative, Portrait Bromide Print By Manning Bros. Detroit, Mich.