City of Dublin Steam Cys. Works, North Wall. Mr. J. C. Shaw. Dublin, 22 Jany. 1839.

A Report of the state of the "Royal Adelaide" Boilers, this day, on her arrival from Belfast.

Andfind them in good order.

J. Marr. James Powell, Foreman.

City of Dublin Steam Cy's. Works, North Wall. Mr J. C. Shaw. Dublin, 22nd Jany.1839.

A Report of the state of the "Royal Adelaide" Engines, this day, oh her arrival from Belfast.

And find them in working condition.

J. Marr. A. Clegg, Foreman.

City of Dublin Steam Cy's. Works, North Wall. Mr. J. C. Shaw. Dublin, 24th Jany.1839.

A Report of the state of the "Duke of Cambridge" Engines, this day, on her arrival from London.

Two furnaces want repairing, and coal-bunkers will not do, which will take about two days.

J. Marr. James Powell, Foreman.

City of Dublin Steam Cy's. Works, Clarence Dock.

Liverpool, 25'* Jany.1839.

A Report of the state of the " Queen Victoria" Hull, this day, on her arrival from Dublin.

In want of a new piece of rubber on the larboard side.

To Mr. J. C. Shaw. Jas. M'Ardle, Foreman.

The report states "that boilers are very frequently continued in use till they become dangerously thin; and that they are frequently deficient in safety apparatus is a fact, not only evidenced by the Table of Explosions, and instances given, but attested by a large majority of our correspondents. We were shown several in the yards of engine and boiler-makers, which (to use their own expression) 'might be walked through;' indeed, the hand might be pushed through some boilers which we examined, but recently taken out of steam boats. Mr. Shaw states, 'that the boilers of the Fingal, in 1835, were so weak that they bad to be shored between the decks and the tops of them, which expanded and contracted like a pair of bellows. Captain Bain writes that ' he has frequently had occasion, sometimes under very trying circumstances, to stop rents in boilers by temporary expedients; that he has witnessed it in other vessels, and has seen boilers worked till they were as thin as paper.'

"Some boilers, in actual use, are only kept tight by the deposit of mud, concretions of salt and sand, etc. between the flues; these obstructions to the passage of heat are not removed, as the metal of the boilers would give way, and they must then, necessarily, undergo repair, which is delayed till they will no longer hold together, or till ruptures occur, and have produced mischief.

"The explosion of deteriorated boilers is not the greatest danger to be apprehended from steamers so ill provided. Under the head of wrecks and founder -ings, the calamitous consequences of boilers failing at sea are still more fearfully exemplified.

"Great additional safety is obtained by employing several boilers, distinct from each other, rather than one only, or two boilers connected together; many dangers are avoided by this method. Independently of the obvious security arising from the means thus afforded of shutting off a disabled boiler, and even of repairing it, whilst the motion of the engines is continued by the others, this arrangement possesses many other advantages, and cannot be too strongly recommended for general adoption.

" Several wrecks have been referred to by our correspondents, which might have been averted, had the paddle-wheels been furnished with disengaging apparatus, which is effected too slowly and clumsily by removing the floats,-an operation also difficult of accomplishment in tempestuous weather."