Persons who have occasion to use tool or carbon steel now and then and do not have access to an assorted stock of this material find that the kind most readily obtained at the hardware store is the unannealed steel known as chisel steel. Machining or filing such steel is exceedingly slow and difficult, besides the destruction of tools; as a matter of fact this steel is intended for chisels, drills, and like tools which require only forging and filing. If this steel is annealed, it can be worked as easily as the more expensive annealed steel.

Annealing may be done by heating the steel to a cherry red, not any more, and burying it in a box of slaked lime, where it is allowed to remain until all the heat is gone. If well done, the metal will be comparatively soft and in a condition to machine easily and rapidly. In lieu of lime, bury in ashes, sand, loam, or any substance not inflammable, but fine enough to closely surround the steel and exclude the air so that the steel cools very slowly.

If possible, keep the steel red hot in the fire several hours, the longer the better. In certain processes, like that of file manufacturing, the steel blanks are kept hot for 48 hours or more. Where it is impossible to wait so long as the foregoing method takes, then a cold water anneal may be used with less time. This method consists of heating the work as slowly and thoroughly as the time will permit, then removing the steel from the fire and allowing it to cool in the air until black and then quenching in water.

In addition to softening the steel, annealing benefits the metal by relieving strains in the piece. Should a particularly accurate job be called for, the steel should be annealed again after the roughing cuts have been taken and before machining to the final size. This will insure a true job and diminishes the danger of spring in the final hardening. --Contributed by Donald A. Hampson, Middletown, N. Y.

How To Make A Post Card Holder [363]