Weighting Indian Clubs

Weighting Indian Clubs 559

An ordinary Indian club can be fixed so that different weights may be had without changing clubs. Each club is bored to receive lead washers which are held in place by a spiral spring. A bolt is run through from the handle end and fastened with a round nut. The lead washers and spring slip over the bolt as shown in the illustration. Changing the number of washers changes the weight of the club. --Contributed by Walter W. White, Denver, Colo.

Holder For Flexible Lamp-Cord

The holder is made of a round stick--a piece of a broom handle will do--as shown in Fig. 1. It is about 1 in. long with two notches cut out for the strands of the cord. These holders are easily made and will answer the purpose almost as well as the ones made in porcelain. Painting or enameling will improve not only their appearance, but also their insulating properties.

Ceiling Cord Holder

Ceiling-Cord Holder

Several of can be used along a line, as shown in Fig. 2. --Contributed by M. Musgrove, Boissevain, Man.

Support For Double Clotheslines

Anyone using a double clothesline over pulleys will find the arrangement shown in Fig. 1 for supporting the lower line quite convenient. The support is made of a piece of 3/4-in. square or round wood which has a screw-eye turned into each end. The line is run through these screw-eyes as shown in Fig. 2. --Contributed by W. W. Up-DeGraff, Fruitvale, Cal.

Holder on a Clothesline

Holder on a Clothesline

Holding Eyeglasses Firm

Persons who wear noseglasses and who are troubled with excessive perspiration, should chalk the sides of the bridge of the nose before putting on the glasses. The latter will then never slip, even in the warmest weather. If the chalk shows, use a pink stick, which can be purchased from any art school or supply store.

Substitute For Gummed Paper

Gummed paper is a great convenience in the home especially for labels, but it is not always found among the household supplies. The gummed portions of unsealed envelopes in which circulars are received can be utilized for this purpose. Quite a large label may be made from these envelope flaps.

Calls While You Are Out

If you wish to know whether or not the door or telephone bell rings during your absence, place a little rider of paper or cardboard on the clapper in such a way that it will be dislodged if the bell rings.

Bill File Made Of Corkscrews

An ordinary corkscrew makes a convenient file for small bills or memoranda. It may be thrown in any position without danger of the papers slipping off. A rack to hold a number of files can be made of a wood strip (Fig. 1) fitted with hooks or screw eyes cut in a hook shape, as shown in Fig. 2,

Bill File

Bill File

Single bills may be separated from the others and will remain separated as in Fig. 3. Contributed by James M. Kane, Doylestown, Pa.

Ornamental Metal Inkstand

The metal required for making this stand is 3/16 in. in width and may be steel, brass or copper. The shaping is done as shown in Figs. 2 and 3. There are, in all, eight pieces to be bent. The two supports are each formed of one piece of metal with the exception that the end scroll pieces on the under side are made separately. Eight rivets are required to fasten the two horizontal rings to the supports. The glass receptacle can be purchased at a stationery store. Inkstand and Details of Frame

Illustration: Inkstand and Details of Frame

Measure

Never guess the length of a piece of work--measure it.

Removing Glass Letters From Windows

Glass letters are removed in the same way as metal letters, by applying caustic soda or potash around the edges of the letters. As the cement softens, manipulate the point of a pocket knife under the edges of the letter until the caustic works completely under and makes it easy to lift the letters. With care and patience, every letter may be thus taken off without breakage.

To Hang Heavy Things On A Nail

Boys will find many places around the house, where a hook to hang things on will be a great convenience. Instead of buying hooks use wire nails, and if driven as shown in the cut, they will support very heavy weights. Drive the lower nail first.

To Hang Heavy Things On A Nail 567

Insulating Aluminum Wire

Aluminum wire plunged hot into a cold solution of carbonate of soda becomes coated with a strong layer of oxide which forms an excellent insulator to electricity.

Greasing The Front Wheels Of An Automobile

The front wheel bearings of an automobile can be greased without removing the wheels in the following manner: Remove the hub caps and fill with heavy grease and then screw them in place. Continue this operation until the grease is forced between all the bearings and out through the small clearance on the opposite side of the wheels. This should be done at least once every month to keep bearings well lubricated and free from grit. Dirt cannot enter a well filled bearing as easily as muddy water can enter a dry bearing. --Contributed by Chas. E. Frary, Norwalk, O.