The thickness of sirup for canning fruits depends on the kind of fruit with which it is to be used and the richness of the product desired.

In order to obtain three grades of sirup for ordinary use in canning, sugar and water may be combined in the following proportions and heated only until the sugar is dissolved. The quantity of water is kept constant in order to show the variation in the quantity of sugar used.

Thin sirup (about a 30-per-cent solution): 1 3/4 cups of sugar and 4 cups of water. This sirup may be used for such fruits as apples, pears, raspberries, and other sweet berries, when a rich product is not desired.

Medium sirup (about a 40-per-cent solution): 2 3/4 cups of sugar and 4 cups of water. This sirup may be used for such fruits as sweet plums, blackberries, and sweet cherries.

Thick sirup (about a 55-per-cent solution): 5 cups of sugar and 4 cups of water. This sirup may be used for such fruits as peaches, cherries, or pineapples when a sweet product is desired.

A still thicker sirup may be desirable for rhubarb, gooseberries, currants, sour cherries, and other very sour fruits. Such a sirup may be made by boiling the thick sirup until it begins to spin a thread instead of using it when the sugar has just dissolved.