Pot Herbs

Parsley is a hardy biennial, a native of Sardinia, introduced in 1548. It may be gathered for drying in May, June, and July.

Tarragon is a strong-smelling perennial from Siberia; introduced before 1548. It may be gathered for drying in June, July, and August.

Fennel is a perennial which when it once grows in a garden can scarcely be got out of the soil. Fennel may be gathered for drying in May, June, and July.

Sweet Herbs

Thyme and Lemon Thyme are natives of the South of Europe, introduced before 1548. They will dry for keeping, and should be gathered for that purpose about the end of July or August.

Sage is a much taller plant. It is a native of the South of Europe, and was introduced in 1597. It maybe gathered for drying in August and September. Sage leaves rubbed on the teeth clean them pleasantly.

Mint

There are three kinds of Mint - the common or spearhead, used for mint-sauce, boiling with peas, dried, etc. The pepper-mint is only-used for distilling, like the penny-royal. They are all British perennials. Mint may be gathered for drying in June and July.

Marjoram

There are four kinds: the Pot Marjoram, a native of Sicily, introduced in 1759. The Sweet or Knotted Marjoram, a hardy-biennial; a native of Portugal, introduced about 1573, and sown every year from French seed. The Winter Marjoram, a native of Germany, introduced 1640; and the Common Marjoram, a native of Britain. Knotted marjoram may be gathered for drying in July.

Savory

Winter and Summer Savory are natives of the South of Europe, and have been cultivated in Britain since 1650. Summer savory may be gathered for drying at the end of July and August. Winter savory at the same time.

Basil is an annual, a native of the East Indies, introduced in 1548. All herbs should be gathered in the sunshine, or at least on a very dry day. They should be dried immediately by the heat of a stove or Dutch oven, the leaves picked off and bottled at once.