Probably to many people in this country the name of Miss Selma Lagerlof, who was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in

1910, is almost unknown. In Sweden, however, it is almost a household word. Miss Lagerlof is loved and admired by everybody, and although she was an unknown school-teacher when her first novel, "Gosta Berling," appeared, the story immediately placed her in the front rank of the world's leading novelists The publication came about in a curious way In 1890, a Swedish magazine offered a prize for a story. Miss Lagerlof determined to compete, and sent off her manuscript, which won the prize, and this in spite of the fact that when she had previously sent a portion of it to another magazine, it was re-t urne d with a note which said, "It's all out of keywith the times. We want realism, and this is romantic nonsense." But it was the "romantic nonsense" which the public wanted, and Miss Lagerlof suddenly found herself famous. Since then she has written several other stories, all possessing that wealth of language and charm of style which has so captivated the hearts of all true lovers of literature. Miss Lagerlof is now fifty-one years of age, and confesses that one of her first recollections was a longing to be an authoress.

Miss Selma Lagerlof Copyright, U.s.a.

Miss Selma Lagerlof Copyright, U.s.a.