Grape Jelly

Pick grapes when under ripe. Remove from stems, picking them over carefully. Wash by placing in a strainer or colander, pouring water gently through them. Crush and simmer grapes 5 to 10 minutes to extract juice. Pour into a jelly bag and let drain into an open crock. Measure and use 1 cup of sugar to each cup of juice, adding the sugar after the juice has begun to boil. Cook rapidly until two drops come from the spoon in two different places at the same time. Remove from fire at once and pour into sterilized jelly glasses. When cool, cover with a thin layer of paraffin and a tin cover or paper to protect jar from dust. Mark and store.

Loganberry Jelly

Follow the recipe for dewberry jelly.

Plum Jelly

Pick over and wash the plums well, removing the stems. Put into a kettle and add just enough water to keep from burning, 1 inch of water to 5 inches of fruit. After the skins have burst and the plums are tender, strain through a jelly bag. Boil the juice with 2/3 cup sugar for every cup of juice, adding the sugar after the juice has begun to boil. Cook rapidly until two drops come from the spoon in two different places at the same time. Remove from fire at once and pour into sterilized jelly glasses. When cool, cover with a thin layer of paraffin and a tin cover or paper to protect jar from dust. Mark and store.

Plum Preserves

After the first extraction of juice from the plums in making plum jelly, the pulp may be reserved for preserves. When it is cool enough to handle, remove the seeds, add an equal portion of sugar, and cook to proper consistency for plum preserves. Pour into sterilized glasses. When cool, cover with a thin layer of melted paraffin. Cover to protect from dust. Mark and store.

Quince Jelly

Follow the recipe for apple jelly. If the quinces are not very sour, combine with tart apples when making jelly. Use equal quantities of quince and apple.