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A Book Of Recipes For The Cooking School | by Carrie Alberta Lyford



The book represents a compilation of recipes that have been in use in cooking schools of the country for many years. It is not designed for the use of experienced cooks who are seeking a wider variety and a greater elaboration of recipes but for the young cook who desires to prepare simple dishes well. Each recipe has been carefully tested and every care has been taken to state the directions definitely. In every class which has used the recipes and with every teacher with whom the compiler has worked, suggestions, criticisms, and improvements have been made, so that the book represents the combined labors of many students of cooking. The chapter on Food Preservation contains the material used in a Hampton leaflet prepared with the aid of Miss Alma Kruse whose faithful labors made its completion possible.

TitleA Book Of Recipes For The Cooking School
AuthorCarrie Alberta Lyford
PublisherPress of The Hampton Normal and Agricultural Institute
Year1921
Copyright1921, Carrie Alberta Lyford
AmazonA book of recipes for the cooking school

A Book Of Recipes For The Cooking School

By

Carrie Alberta Lyford

Director Of The Home Economics School

At The Hampton Normal And Agricultural Institute

Formerly Specialist In Home Economics United States Bureau Of Education

Press of The Hampton Normal and Agricultural Institute

Hampton, Va.

Copyrighted August, 1921

by

Carrie Alberta Lyford

Hampton, Virginia

-Introduction
This book of recipes is prepared for the use of the many teachers and students of cooking who feel the need of standard recipes for the every-day dishes with directions simply and concisely stated. ...
-Cooking
Cooking is the preparation of food for the table by, dressing it or by the application of heat in some manner. The processes of cooking include the preparation, selection, and changing of natural f...
-General Rules To Follow In Using Recipes
Accuracy of measurement is absolutely necessary in order to secure uniform results. Although greater accuracy can be secured by making all measurements by weight, the average housekeeper is not provid...
-Beverages. Coffee
When possible it is desirable that coffee be roasted shortly before it is to be prepared and ground at the time of making, as the flavor is quickly lost after roasting, particularly if the coffee be g...
-Tea
There is a great variety of good teas on the market, both black and green. The choice of tea is largely a matter of individual preference. Tea should always be kept in a tightly covered can or jar ...
-Chocolate
An unsweetened chocolate gives the best results for cooking purposes. Chocolate may become rancid if kept too long because of the large amount of fat present. Moisture and heat must be excluded fro...
-Fruit Beverages
Beverages prepared from fresh fruits and served cold are welcome and refreshing in hot weather and are frequently useful during sickness. The citrus fruits usually form the basis of such fruit beve...
-Cooking of Vegetables
Vegetables are cooked to soften the cellulose, to cook the starch, and to develop the flavor. Methods of cooking commonly employed for vegetables are boiling, steaming, baking and frying. Prepare v...
-Vegetables
Vegetables should be used when they are in season, as they are always cheapest and at their best then. One should select those that are fresh and of good quality. Those of medium size are usually best...
-Asparagus
Asparagus should be used while young and fresh, and should be carefully cooked in order to preserve the delicate flavor. Its food value is not high, but it is always a welcome addition to the diet and...
-Beans
Beans are a valuable vegetable for the table, either served green in the pod or matured and removed from the shell. Green String or Wax Beans Green beans do not have high nutritive value b...
-Beets
The whole of the young beet plant, including the root, may be pulled and used while fresh for greens. It is valuable for the organic acids and minerals it provides. When more nearly mature the beet ...
-Cabbage
Cabbage can be used in many ways, both uncooked and cooked. Prolonged cooking renders cabbage somewhat difficult of digestion; therefore care should be taken to cook cabbage only long enough to soften...
-Carrots
Delicate young carrots procured from the garden during the summer and fall are an acceptable addition to the daily menu. They may be cooked alone or combined with meat dishes, soups, and salads to giv...
-Cauliflower
Soak cauliflower in cold salt water to draw out insects. Tie in cheese cloth to prevent falling to pieces, put into a large amount of boiling water and boil rapidly until tender (20-30 min.) leaving k...
-Celery
Separate the pieces of celery from the root and wash each piece thoroughly. Remove any discolored portions with a knife. Cut off the leaves and keep them for garnishing or for soup. Reserve coarse or ...
-Corn
Green corn is a valuable table vegetable, both fresh and canned, because of its agreeable flavor and the cellulose which provides necessary bulk to the diet. Fresh corn should be used on the table ...
-Cucumbers
Cucumbers are valued for their fresh, cool crispness, and are generally eaten raw. They are served with salt, pepper, vinegar and oil, or with salad dressing, alone or combined with other vegetables. ...
-Kale
Kale is used chiefly as greens, being boiled and seasoned much the same as cabbage. Kale Boiled with Pork Boil half a pound of salt pork gently for 3 or 4 hours. Pick kale over carefully, ...
-Kohlrabi
Kohl-rabi should be used when young and tender, while the leaves are not more than 2 or 3 inches in diameter. The leaves are used as greens, but the root is the better part. Boiled Kohl-Rabi ...
-Onions
The onion is of value because of its agreeable flavor, its laxative properties, and because it contains antiscorbutic substances. It can be used raw, alone, and in salads and sandwiches, as well as co...
-Parsnips
Parsnips are among the most nutritious roots and can be kept for use throughout the winter and into the late spring until they begin to sprout. They are rich in sugar and contain a good proportion of ...
-Peas
The mature pea is one of the most valuable and nutritious vegetables. To prepare fresh peas, shell and cook slowly with a small amount of boiling water, leaving the kettle uncovered so that the water ...
-Peppers
Green Peppers Sweet green peppers are prepared for the table by stuffing and baking, or are used as a foundation for salad or as a seasoning in meat preparations, salads, soups, and sauces. When...
-Potatoes
If potatoes are kept in a cold, dark, dry place they last for months. Sprouts which come from the eyes of the potatoes should be picked off. Potatoes should be protected from freezing. Before using...
-Potatoes. Part 2
Mashed Potatoes 6 potatoes 1/2 cup hot milk or cream 1 tablespoon butter or other fat 1 teaspoon salt Wash and pare potatoes, boil in salted water, drain, dry, and mash (with a potato masher)...
-Potatoes. Part 3
Potato Roses for Garnishing 6 large potatoes or 2 cups cooked potatoes 3 tablespoons butter 3 egg yolks 1/2 teaspoon salt Boil me potatoes till tender, dram, dry well. mash or press thr...
-Potatoes. Part 4
Scalloped Potatoes with Eggs 2 cups cold boiled potatoes 4 hard cooked eggs 1 1/2 cups thin white sauce 1 cup buttered bread crumbs (2 tablespoons butter) Slice the potatoes and eggs, arrange...
-Salsify, Oyster Plant, Or Vegetable Oyster
Salsify is one of the vegetables of value throughout the winter. Its food value is not high, but it contains some protein, carbohydrate, and mineral matter. Because of its delicate flavor it makes a p...
-Squash
Summer squash should be used while fresh. Hubbard or winter squash is good through the winter months. Summer squash, cushaw or crookneck squash, and cym-lings, should be washed, broken into pieces ...
-Tomatoes
Ripe tomatoes must be kept in a cold, dry place and very carefully handled or they will spoil easily. They are best if eaten soon after being gathered. If tomatoes are gathered before they are quite r...
-Turnips
The turnip is a winter vegetable valuable in furnishing variety to the table. It has a heavy outer covering, hence must be pared with a thick paring. Creamed Turnips Scrub turnips. Pare wi...
-Mushrooms
Fresh mushrooms may be in season from the spring throughout the summer, but are most abundant in August. Those grown in the open air in meadows and shaded glens have the best flavor. They should not b...
-Sauces For Vegetables And Meats
Binding or 'Roux is the flour and fat cooked together for the thickening of a sauce. For white sauce and other sauces light in color the roux is not browned. For brown sauce, tomato sauce, and gra...
-Sauces For Vegetables And Meats. Continued
Thin White Sauce to be used for Scalloped Dishes or Dishes Au Gratin 1 1/2 tablespoons butter or butter substitute 1 1/2 tablespoons flour 1/2 teaspoon salt white pepper 1/2 cup milk (heated) 1/2 c...
-Fruits
The skins of fruit carry dirt and germs, therefore all fruits should be washed before using. Prepare fresh fruit just before cooking to preserve flavor and prevent discoloration. Use only silver knive...
-Food Preservation
The object of food preservation is to make fruits and vegetables of value for a longer time than through their ripening season. After ripening, fermentation and bacteriological changes take place so r...
-Cold-Pack Method of Canning
In the can-cooked, or cold-pack, method the food is scalded or blanched in boiling water or steam, dipped into cold water, packed directly into the jars, and covered with boiling water, or with boilin...
-Cold-Pack Method of Canning. Part 2
General Rules For Cold-Pack Canning 1 Can only fresh, sound products. 2 Sort, wash, and prepare the products. 3 Blanch all green vegetables in steam; blanch all other vegetables and the ha...
-Cold-Pack Method of Canning. Part 3
Equipment Necessary for Cold-Pack Canning 1 wash-boiler or lard can with a cover which has been punctured to allow for escape of steam. 1 wooden rack or false bottom to fit in bottom of boiler o...
-Canned Vegetables
General directions for canning by the cold-pack method have already been given. The general rules should be followed, the cautions carefully observed with every recipe, and the time given for each pro...
-Canned Vegetables. Part 2
Canned Carrots (Cold-Pack Method) Carrots used for canning should be young; and tender and not more than 1 1/2 inches in diameter. Wash and blanch in boiling water 8 minutes. Dip into cold water, r...
-Canned Vegetables. Part 3
Canned Lima Beans (Cold-Pack Method) Follow the directions for canning peas, but allow 5 to 8 minutes for blanching and sterilize 3 hours. Canned Okra (Cold-Pack Method) Young, tender p...
-Canned Vegetables. Part 4
Canned String Beans (Cold-Pack Method) Wash and string the green beans which have been freshly gathered. Plunge into boiling water 5 to 8 minutes according to size, and then plunge into cold water ...
-Pickles And Other Relishes
Bacteria do not grow in substances that contain a large amount of acid; hence there is little danger of those pickles spoiling that have been prepared with a large amount of vinegar. Cloves, cinnamon,...
-Pickles And Other Relishes. Part 2
Dixie Relish (Cold-Pack Method) 1 quart chopped cabbage 1 pint chopped white onion 1 pint chopped sweet red pepper 1 pint chopped green pepper 5 tablespoons mustard seed 2 tablespoons celery ...
-Pickles And Other Relishes. Part 3
Pickled Peaches 8 pounds peaches 2 or 3 cloves in each 4 pounds sugar 1 pint vinegar Wash the peaches, but do not peel them. Remove the buds from the ends of the cloves and insert 2 or 3' clo...
-Pickles And Other Relishes. Part 4
Tomato Ketchup (Open-Kettle Method) 12 ripe tomatoes 2 large onions 4 green peppers 2 tablespoons salt 4 tablespoons brown sugar 2 tablespoons ginger 1 tablespoon cinnamon 1 tablespoon mustard 1...
-Canned Meats
Canned Beef or Pork (Cold-Pack Method) Fresh meat may be kept indefinitely by canning according to the following directions: - Cut meat into pieces about 3 or 4 inches square, removing all bones...
-Canned Fruits
Almost all fruits give satisfactory results when canned, and the thrifty housewife will have a large number of jars of canned fruits on the pantry shelves. General directions for canning must be obser...
-Canned Fruits. Continued
Canned Apples (Cold-Pack Method) Wash, quarter, pare, and core sound apples. Blanch 1 1/2 minutes in boiling water. Plunge quickly into cold water. Pack in sterilized jars. Place rubbers in positio...
-Jelly Making
The art of preparing jellies from the juice of fruits is one in which every housewife is eager to perfect herself. One can point with justifiable pride to the shelf of well-made jellies that are going...
-Jelly Making. Part 2
How To Make Jelly Pick the fruit over carefully and wash it thoroughly. Remove any decayed or imperfect portions, but do not discard the skins and sound cores because of the presence of pectin in t...
-Jelly Making. Part 3
Grape Jelly Pick grapes when under ripe. Remove from stems, picking them over carefully. Wash by placing in a strainer or colander, pouring water gently through them. Crush and simmer grapes 5 to 1...
-Jams, Marmalades, And Preserves
Jams, marmalades, and preserves are canned by the open-kettle method, because it is necessary to cook them long and slowly with a large amount of sugar in order to evaporate the water and secure the d...
-Jams, Marmalades, And Preserves. Part 2
Grape Jam 1 basket ripe grapes Sugar Remove the grapes from the stem. Wash them and press the pulp from the skins. Boil the pulp until it will separate from the seeds. Rub through a sieve. Ad...
-Jams, Marmalades, And Preserves. Part 3
Pear Preserves 2 pounds pears 1 1/2 pounds sugar 2 cups water 1 lemon 4 pieces ginger root Make a syrup of the sugar and water, adding the ginger root and the lemon rind cut in thin strips...
-Jams, Marmalades, And Preserves. Part 4
Watermelon-Rind Preserves 1 pound melon rind 1 ounce lime 2 quarts water 1 pound sugar 1 lemon Cut rind in 1/2 inch squares. Remove peel and all pink part, and weigh. Soak over night in...
-Candies
Sugar (a) Sugar is used in cooking - (1) To increase the carbohydrate in the diet. (2) To add flavor to other foods. (3) To aid in the preservation of other foods. (4) To serve as the b...
-Candies. Part 2
Caramels 2 cups sugar 3/4 cup glucose 1/2 cup butter 1 pint cream 1/2 cup pecans 1 teaspoon vanilla Combine sugar, glucose, butter, and 1 cup cream and heat until it boils thoroughly. Add rem...
-Candies. Part 3
Fudge 2 cups sugar 1 cup milk 2 tablespoons butter 2 squares chocolate 1/2 teaspoon vanilla Cook all the ingredients together slowly, stirring until sugar is all dissolved. Then boil wi...
-Candies. Part 4
Pop-Corn Balls 6 to 12 ears pop-corn Salt 1 cup molasses 1/2 cup sugar, brown or white 1/2 tablespoon vinegar 1/2 tablespoon butter Pop enough corn to make 3 quarts. Salt the corn. Boil...
-Cereals
Cereals should be kept in a dry place protected from the moisture of the air. As a rule they do not spoil readily unless warm and damp. Before using, cereals should be carefully examined to make su...
-Cereals. Continued
Cornmeal Mush 4 cups boiling water 1 teaspoon salt 1 cup cornmeal Look the cornmeal over carefully and add slowly to boiling salted water. Boil 10 minutes, stirring constantly, then cook 3...
-Rice
Boiled Rice 3 qts. boiling water 2 teaspoons salt 1 cup rice Pick rice over carefully and wash thoroughly. Add it so gradually to the boiling salted water that the water will not stop boiling...
-Eggs
To be of value in cooking, eggs should be fresh as the flavor becomes affected with age. Old eggs are not so satisfactory for use in cooking as fresh because in the old egg it is more difficult to sep...
-Eggs. Continued
Economy in Using Eggs in Cooking (1) If eggs are used as a thickening in sauce, soup, salad dressing, or pudding, they can be replaced by flour or corn starch. One whole egg can be replaced by 2 ta...
-Omelets
There are two classes of omelets, the French or Creamy omelets in which the eggs are beaten all together and only slightly, and light omelet in which the eggs are separated and whites beaten stiff and...
-Souffles
Souffles are preparations which are puffed up or made light by the presence of whites of eggs. They are much used as entrees and may be either savory or sweet in character. Souffles are a variation ...
-Milk
Milk should be kept in a cool, clean place, free from odors, in a perfectly clean, covered vessel of suitable material - earthen, porcelain, glass or tin. The sanitary condition of milk is of the utmo...
-Custards
A custard is a combination of eggs and milk, usually sweetened and flavored and either steamed or baked as cup custard, or cooked in a double boiler as soft custard. The whole egg may be used or the y...
-Cheese
Cheese should be kept in a cool, dry place in a ventilated tin box or covered with cheese cloth. Do not keep cheese in ice box or cupboard near other food. When cheese becomes hard and dry, grate and ...
-Soups. Vegetable Soups
Vegetable Soup Without Meat Stock 1 onion 1 carrot 1 turnip 1 piece celery 1 cabbage leaf 1 pepper 1 sprig parsley 1 quart water 1 quart tomatoes 1 bay leaf 2 cloves ...
-Cream Soups
The strained pulp of cooked vegetables, greens, and cereals with an equal portion of thin white sauce is the basis of cream soups. Thickening. A binding of butter and flour is used to prevent a sep...
-Cream Soups. Continued
Cream of Potato Soup 3 potatoes 1 teaspoon salt 3 cups milk Pepper 1/2 cup cream Celery salt 2 egg yolks Boil the potatoes until soft, drain, mash, add hot milk, and strain. Add beaten yol...
-Meat Soups
Soup stock consists of the juices and soluble portions of meat or fish, bones and vegetables which have been extracted by long, slow cooking. The basis of stock may be beef, veal, mutton, fish, poultr...
-Meat Soups. Continued
White Stock 1 knuckle of veal 2 lbs. veal meat 1/4 cup onion 1/4 cup carrot 1/2 cup celery Parsley 1/2 teaspoon peppercorn 2 teaspoons salt 4 quarts cold water Cut meat in small pieces....
-Fish Soups
Fish Chowder 1 lb. fish 2 pints cold water 4 potatoes 4 tablespoons butter 2 small onions, cut fine 4 tablespoons flour 2 teaspoons salt 1/2 teaspoon white pepper 1 quart milk Remove fi...
-Meat
The term meats applies to the flesh of animals which is used as food and includes Meats Proper, Poultry, and Game. Specifically the term meat is applied to the flesh of domestic animals which i...
-Beef
Beef is the meat most commonly used. It is in season all the year, its food value is high, and it is easy of digestion when well cooked. Tests for Good Beef 1 Color - bright red after stan...
-Beef. Continued
The Hind Quarter The hind quarter of beef is all that portion of the side lying back of the last rib. In some markets the last rib is included in the hind quarter. The Flank Steak is the first...
-Veal
Veal is the name applied to the meat from the young calf of from 6 weeks to 9 months old. Meat from a younger animal is very unwholesome and its use is prohibited by law. Bob-veal is the name given ...
-Mutton
Mutton is the meat of sheep from three to five years old. The best English mutton is taken from a sheep six years old. Lamb is the meat of young sheep of from six weeks to three months old. When one y...
-Pork
Pork differs from other meats chiefly in the large amount of fat distributed through the muscular fiber. This renders the meat difficult of digestion and makes it a particularly valuable food for c...
-Cooking Of Meats
When meat is to be used, it should be weighed, trimmed, and wiped with a cloth wrung out of cold water. Meat is cooked to develop the extractives, to improve the appearance, to soften the connectiv...
-Meat Recipes
Hamburg Steak 1 lb. lean beef (from round) 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/8 teaspoon pepper 1 teaspoon onion juice 1 teaspoon chopped parsley Chop meat fine or run through a meat grinder. Season, sha...
-Meat Recipes. Part 2
Roast Veal 5 lbs. shoulder of veal 4 cups bread crumbs 2 teaspoons salt 1/4 teaspoon pepper 1/2 teaspoon thyme 1/2 teaspoon savory 1/2 teaspoon marjoram 4 tablespoons butter Bone the shoulder...
-Meat Recipes. Part 3
Curry of Mutton 2 lbs. neck mutton 3 onions, sliced 1/2 teaspoon peppercorns 1 sprig thyme 1 sprig parsley 1 quart boiling water 1/4 cup flour 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/8 teaspoon pepper 1/2 tab...
-Meat Recipes. Part 4
Creamed Chipped Beef 1 1/2 lb. dried beef, chipped 2 tablespoons butter or other fat 3 tablespoons flour Pepper 1 1/2 cup hot milk Cover the beef with boiling water for 3 minutes, then drair ...
-Liver
The livers of many animals are used for food. Those of the beef, calf, and lamb are most commonly used. The liver is one of the cheap animal foods unless there is a great demand for it, then the pr...
-Bacon
Bacon is prepared from the flanks of pork, salted, dried, and smoked. Bacon is an expensive form of food. Sliced and packed in jars it is still more expensive and only desirable when bacon in th...
-Sweetbreads
Sweetbread is the term applied to the thymus gland of the calf. This gland becomes so changed as not to be edible when the animal grows older; in some animals it may eventually be absorbed. The swe...
-Poultry
Poultry is the term given to the domestic birds used as food and includes fowls and chickens, turkeys, tame ducks and geese. A chicken which is more than one year old is known as a fowl. A chicken whi...
-Fowl
Roast Fowl After a fowl has been dressed and cleaned fill with stuffing, truss securely in compact shape, and lay on its back on a rack in a roasting pan. Dredge with flour, salt, and pepper, dot w...
-Chicken
Fricasseed Chicken 1 stewed fowl 2 tablespoons fat 1/4 cup flour 1 teaspoon salt 1/8 teaspoon pepper 1 pint stock or more 2 egg yolks 2 tablespoons chopped parsley When fowl is te...
-Duck. Goose
Roast Duck Select a young, fat duck. The lower part of the legs and webbing of the feet should be soft. Singe and draw the duck in the same manner as a chicken. Wipe it inside and outside with a da...
-Fish
The flesh of fish is used for food; the caviar, which is the salted roe or spawn of the sturgeon, shad roe, and the coral or ovaries of lobsters are all considered delicacies. The season for fish v...
-Fish. Part 2
Baked Fish Clean the fish, sprinkle with salt, and fill with stuffing, sew or skewer the edges together. Cut gashes on each side across the fish, and put strips of salt pork into them. Fold a piece...
-Fish. Part 3
Creamed Codfish 2 tablespoons butter 1/2 pound fish (1 pint shredded) S 3 tablespoons flour 1 pint milk 1 egg Soak the fish, if very salt, at least 1 hour. Drain and shred. Brown the fish in b...
-Oysters
Oysters are in season from September to May - through the months containing r. In the summer months the oysters are spawning and are not considered good. Oysters are often fattened or soaked ...
-Cooking In Fats
Fats are considered a desirable medium for cooking some foods because they can be heated to so high a temperature and cook the food very quickly. When cooked in fats some foods develop special flavors...
-Egging and Crumbing
Many foods do not become covered with a crust when subjected to high heat in deep fat. Such foods must have some egg added to the mixture or be coated with a substance which forms a crust quickly. For...
-Croquettes
Croquettes are an attractive form in which to serve leftovers. They are used for a luncheon dish or as an entree at dinner. The ingredients used in croquettes are usually already cooked and are fin...
-Batters And Doughs
Batters and doughs are mixtures of flour or meal and a liquid, with salt and sugar to give flavor, butter to make tender, and air or gas to make light. Doughs are thicker than batters. Flour and wa...
-Ways of Combining Ingredients
1 To stir, merely for the purpose of combining ingredients, means to mix by circular motion with a spoon. 2 To beat, for the purpose of enclosing air in the mixture, means turning the ingredients o...
-General Directions for Mixing Batters
1 Have oven at proper temperature, and see that the fire is in good condition and well regulated. The oven temperature should be about 375 degrees, or test by putting in a piece of white paper or 2 te...
-Pop-Overs
1 cup flour 1/4 teaspoon salt 1 or 2 eggs 7/8 cup milk 1/2 teaspoon melted butter Mix and sift flour and salt. Add yolks of egg to milk and add gradually to the flour to obtain a smooth batte...
-Baking Powder Mixtures
To Prepare Baking Powder Mixtures. Pastry flour is best for baking-powder mixtures, and should be sifted once before measuring. Only standard baking-powders should be used. Use 2 teaspoons baking p...
-Dumplings
2 cups flour 4 teaspoons baking powder 1/2 teaspoon salt 2 tablespoons butter or other fat 3/4 cup milk or water Sift dry ingredients, cut in fat, and add milk gradually. Toss onto a floured boa...
-Scones
2 cups flour 1 teaspoon cream of tartar 1/2 teaspoon soda 1 teaspoon salt 4 tablespoons butter 1/4 cup sugar 2/3 cup raisins or currants 1/4 cup sour milk 2 eggs Mix and sift the dry ingre...
-Muffins
3 cups flour 4 teaspoons baking powder 1/2 cup corn meal 3 teaspoons baking powder 2 tablespoons sugar 1/2 teaspoon salt 1 1/2 cup milk 2 eggs 2 tablespoons butter Mix and sift dry ingr...
-Gems
Graham Gems 2 cups graham flour 1/4 cup sugar 1/4 teaspoon salt 3 teaspoons baking powder 1 cup milk 1 egg 1 tablespoon melted butter or oleomargarine Mix and sift dry ingredients. A...
-Corn Bread
1 1/2 cup corn meal 1 1/2 cup flour 1 1/2 teaspoon salt 1 tablespoon sugar 4 teaspoons baking powder 2 eggs 2 cups milk 3 tablespoons butter or other fat If sour milk is used omit ba...
-Griddle Cakes
Batter - Griddle cakes are prepared in the form of thin batters. Sweet, sour, or butter milk may be used in griddle cakes. Flour, stale bread, rice, corn meal or other cereals may form the found...
-Waffles
The Batter - Waffles are prepared with a thin batter richer than that used for griddle cakes and made lighter by the use of more eggs. The Waffle Iron - Waffles are baked in a corrugated waffle iro...
-Fritters
Fritters are batters or doughs which are fried in deep fat. Some vegetable or fruit is usually added to the batter or the fritter may be served with a sweet sauce or preserve. Fritters are served a...
-Timbales
Timbales are entrees which are moulded and cooked in cases, or the term is applied to pastry preparations which are cooked in the shape of cases. The moulded timbale preparations may be savory or s...
-Bread
Yeast bread or light bread is made by using yeast to produce the gas necessary for making the bread light. Yeast Yeast is a kind of plant without leaves, stems, or blossoms, microscopic ...
-Bread. Continued
Liquid Yeast 2 ounces hops 2 quarts water 1/2 pound brown sugar 2 teaspoons salt 1 pound flour 3 pounds potatoes Boil the hops and water 1 hour. Add the sugar, salt, and flour. Let stand f...
-Making Bread
The processes in bread making consist of mixing, kneading, rising, and baking. I Mixing - The method of mixing bread may be varied according to the kind of yeast used and the time allowed for risin...
-Bread Recipes
Steamed Brown Bread 4 cups rye meal 2 cups corn meal 1 tablespoon soda 1 teaspoon salt 1 cup molasses 4 cups sour milk Mix the dry ingredients thoroughly, add the molasses; then the milk. Bea...
-Bread Recipes. Continued
Beaten Bread Follow the bread recipe, but use only enough flour to make a very stiff batter that can be beaten. Beat mixture until flour is thoroughly mixed, let sponge rise till double in bulk; th...
-Rolls
Parker House Rolls 1 pint milk (scalded) 2 tablespoons butter or oleomargarine 2 tablespoons sugar 1 teaspoon salt 1/4 yeast cake, if mixed at night 1 cake, if mixed in the morning 1/4 cup wa...
-Buns
1 cup milk (scalded) 3/8 cup sugar 1 egg- 1/4 teaspoon salt 1/4 yeast cake 1/4 cup water 2 cups flour Make a sponge, beat thoroughly, and when light add - 1/4 cup butter (softened) 1...
-Uses for Stale Bread
Stale bread, crumbed, is suitable for bread puddings, dressings and fillings for scalloped dishes, omelets, griddle cakes, etc. Small dried pieces of stale bread may be rolled or ground, sifted and...
-Toast
Cut stale bread into slices 1/4 inch thick, put on toaster or fork, move gently over the heat until dry, then brown by placing nearer the heat, turning constantly. Bread may be dried in the oven befor...
-Crisp Crackers
Split thick soda crackers, spread with butter, put on a baking sheet and place in the oven to brown. Serve with soup or salad. Nut Wafers 12 salt wafers 1 egg white 1/4 cup chopped nuts...
-Sandwiches
I The Bread - Sandwiches may be prepared from white, brown, graham or entire wheat bread. Crackers, pastry, and sweet wafers are sometimes used for fancy sandwiches. A bread of fine grain cuts to the ...
-Scalloped Dishes
Scalloped dishes are made by combining foods with buttered crumbs and baking. If the vegetable or fruit contains a large amount of juice, buttered crumbs are used alone. If the food be a dry vegetable...
-Garnishings
Feed is garnished (1) to please the eye; (2) to improve the flavor; (3) to increase the nutritive value; (4) to increase the bulk or sufficiency for service. . A garnish must meet the following req...
-Salads
Salads may be divided into classes according to the materials of which they are prepared. Class I - Salads prepared from the green salad plants, used when green and tender, and prepared without coo...
-Recipes For Salad Dressings
French Dressing 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/4. teaspoon pepper 1 tablespoon vinegar 3 tablespoons olive oil Have oil and vinegar very cold. Put ingredients in a bowl and stir briskly until thoroughly...
-Recipes For Salads
Cole Slaw Pour cooked dressing (while hot) over shaved cabbage, mix well, chill, and serve. Serves 10 to 12. 3 cups shaved cabbage 1 recipe cooked salad dressing Tomato Salad Tomatoes Lett...
-Recipes For Salads. Part 2
Potato Salad 4 cold boiled potatoes 1 small cucumber 1 stalk celery 1 bunch parsley 1/2 teaspoon chopped parsley 2 hard cooked eggs 2 cold boiled beets French Dressing Mayonnaise dressing Dic...
-Recipes For Salads. Part 3
Tomato Jelly Salad 2 tablespoons granulated gelatine 1/2 cup cold water 1 can tomatoes 1 piece bay leaf 3 peppercorns 1 teaspoon sugar 1 slice onion 3 cloves 2 teaspoons salt Soak the g...
-Cakes
There are two general classes of cakes - Sponge Cakes and Butter Cakes. Sponge Cakes are made light wholly by the presence of eggs lightly beaten and are usually made without baking powder, butter,...
-Cake Recipes
Yellow Cake No. 1 1/2 cup butter or oleomargarine 1 cup sugar 2 eggs 1/2 cup milk 2 teaspoons baking powder 1 1/2 cups flour 1 1/2 teaspoons flavoring or 1 teaspoon spice Cream the butt...
-Cake Recipes. Part 2
Spiced Eggless Cake No. 2 1/3 cup oleomargarine or other fat. 1 cup brown sugar 1 cup sour milk 2 cups flour 1 teaspoon soda 1 teaspoon cinnamon 1/2 teaspoon nutmeg 1/4 teaspoon cloves ...
-Cake Recipes. Part 3
White Sponge Cake or Angel Food 12 egg whites 1 1/2 cups sugar (measured after sifting) 1 cup and 1 tablespoon flour 1 1/2 teaspoons cream of tartar 1 teaspoon vanilla Sift the sugar 5 times ...
-Small Cakes And Cookies
Any cake batter may be baked in muffin tins to make small individual cakes to be served as tea cakes. These will require a hotter oven than loaf and layer cakes, and can be baked in a shorter time. ...
-Cookies
1 cup butter or oleomargarine 1 cup sugar 2 eggs 1/4 cup milk 3 cups flour 3 teaspoons baking powder 1 tablespoon cinnamon 1/2 cup sugar Cream the butter, add the sugar, and the well...
-Small Cakes
Ginger Drop Cakes 1/4 cup butter 1/2 cup sugar 1 teaspoon ground cloves 1 teaspoon cinnamon 1 tablespoon ginger 2 eggs 1 cup molasses 1 teaspoon soda Salt 2 1/2 cups flour 1 cup boil...
-Cake Frostings
Cakes are frosted for the purpose of decoration, to add to the flavor, and to preserve the moisture of the cake. Frostings are both cooked and uncooked. Uncooked frost -ings are made of powdered or...
-Pastry
There are three classes of Pastry: plain, flaky, and puff paste. Plain and flaky paste are used for pies and tarts; puff paste is used for meat pies and patties. Plain paste is prepared by chopp...
-Pastry. Continued
Baking Pastry should be cooked in a hot oven 35 to 50 minutes. After pastry has been in the oven a few minutes, the heat After pastry has been in the oven a few minutes, the heat should be decre...
-Pies
Apple Pie 1 double recipe plain paste 4 or 5 sour apples 1/3 cup sugar 1/4 teaspoon grated nutmeg 1 tablespoon lemon juice 1 tablespoon butter 1 tablespoon water (if apples are not juicy) ...
-Pies. Continued
Chocolate Pie 1 recipe plain paste 3/4 cup flour 2 cups milk 4 tablespoons grated chocolate 3/4 cup sugar 1/2 teaspoon salt 3 eggs 1 tablespoon vanilla Speck of cinnamon 6 tablespoon...
-Tarts
Prepare plain or flaky pastry using from 2 to 3 cups flour. Line muffin tins with pastry. Bake in a moderate oven 30 minutes. Fill with gooseberry jam, currant jelly or other preserve. Hickor...
-Doughnuts
1 pint flour 4 teaspoons baking powder 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/2 cup sugar 1 egg 1/4 to 1/2 cup milk 1 teaspoon butter Mix and sift the dry ingredients. Add 1/4 cup milk to the well-beaten egg, t...
-Desserts
Corn Starch Pudding 1/4 cup sugar 5 tablespoons corn starch 4 cups milk 1 teaspoon vanilla Add sugar to the corn starch and mix with 1 cup milk. Scald the remainder of the milk, add the corn ...
-Desserts. Part 2
Scalloped Rhubarb Follow the recipe for scalloped apple substituting 3 cups sliced rhubarb for the apple and adding 1/2 cup more sugar. Chocolate Bread Pudding 2 cups stale bread crumbs...
-Desserts. Part 3
Banana Snow 3 bananas 1 teaspoon lemon juice 1/2 cup powdered sugar 1 egg white 1/2 cup whipping cream Peel bananas, scrape surface carefully to remove cellulose, and cut in small pieces; ...
-Desserts. Part 4
Tapioca Cream See custards. Strawberry Short Cake 2 cups flour 4 teaspoons baking powder 1/4 teaspoon salt 1 tablespoon sugar 4 tablespoons butter or other fat 1/2 cup milk l egg 1 c...
-Desserts. Part 5
Date Pudding 1 cup chopped dates 1 cup chopped nuts 1 cup sugar 2 tablespoons flour 1 teaspoon baking powder 2 whole eggs Mix the nuts and dates. Add the sugar, flour, and baking powder...
-Desserts. Part 6
Snow Balls 1 cup sugar 3 tablespoons water 2 tablespoons lemon juice Grated rind 1 lemon 1 cup sifted flour 1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder 3 tablespoons powdered sugar Beat the egg yolks...
-Desserts. Part 7
Fruit Jelly 2 tablespoons granulated gelatine 1/4 cup cold water 2 cups boiling water 1 cup sugar 1/2 cup lemon juice 2 oranges 2 bananas 1/2 cup canned fruit Prepare as lemo...
-Desserts. Part 8
Orange Bavarian 1 tablespoon granulated gelatine 2 tablespoons cold water 1 cup orange juice (2 to 3 oranges) 1 small lemon (juice) 1 cup sugar 4 eggs 6 sponge or lady fingers ...
-Pudding Sauces
Hard Sauce 1/3 cup butter 1 cup powdered sugar 1/2 teaspoon flavoring or 1/4 teaspoon nutmeg Cream the butter, add sugar gradually and beat until light and creamy. Add flavoring and beat agai...
-Frozen Dishes
Purposes of Freezing The purpose of freezing is the extraction of heat from food in order to prepare an appetizing and cooling dish that will be refreshing to the body. The degree of heat at whi...
-Frozen Dishes. Continued
General Rules for Freezing The can, cover, and dasher of the freezer should be scalded, and then chilled before the mixture which is to be frozen is placed in it. Adjust the can carefully in the tu...
-Ice Cream
Vanilla Ice Cream 1 quart cream 1 cup sugar 2 tablespoons vanilla extract Scald the cream, add sugar, stir until dissolved, cool, add flavoring, and freeze. Serves 8 to 12. Chocolate...
-Frozen Recipes
Fruit Water Ice or Frozen Fruit 2 cups fruit juice or 3 cups crushed fruit 1 quart water 2 cups sugar 2 tablespoons lemon juice Boil the sugar and water to a syrup, cool, add the fruit ...
-Sherbets
Mills Sherbet 1 quart milk 2 cups sugar 3 large lemons (juice) Freeze the milk and sugar slightly, add the juice of the lemons, and freeze again. Pack until needed. Serves 8 to 12. ...







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