To One Cup

Use Cups Water

Will Make Cups Product

Cornmeal

5 to 6

5 +

Hominy Grits

4 to 5

4 +

Oatmeal

4 to 5

4 +

Oats, rolled

2 to 2 1/2

2 +

Rice

4 to 5

4 +

Samp

4 to 5

4 +

Wheat, finely-ground

5 to 6

5+

Amount of Salt Needed - Tastes differ again here, but a safe rule from which to vary is to use one teaspoonful to each quart of water used.

Swelling of Cereals - The amount of swelling is the same as the amount of water required; that is, rolled cereals swell about twice, coarsely ground or whole cereals swell about four times; and finely ground and refined cereals swell from five to six times.

Time Needed For Cooking - Cereal products have a naturally delicious flavor, although not pronounced, which is brought out by long slow cooking, and the right proportion of water and salt.

Long slow cooking used to mean four to six hours, but manufacturing processes have cut the time considerably - to fifteen or twenty minutes in the case of some of the fine grained wheat products, and even three to five minutes for partially cooked cereals. However, a longer cooking only improves them.

In trying a breakfast cereal for the first time, follow the directions on the package; then if you wish, adapt them to the consistency and saltiness you prefer.

Some cereals may be boiled - notably rice, and those partially cooked products that need only three to five minutes cooking, and so demand but little constant attention. The standard ways of cooking cereals are steaming in a double boiler or baking in a slow oven, as in making creamy rice and Indian puddings. The baking method has obvious advantages, and can well be extended to include cereals for breakfast or entrees, omitting the sugar and flavoring.

If cereal is cooked in the evening for the following breakfast, it may stand in the double boiler all night and be heated in the morning. It is well not to stir it in the morning until it is thoroughly hot, because stirring when cold is apt to cause lumps which resist being made smooth.