Year

Bordeaux Red

(claret)

bordeaux white

Burgundy

Red and White

Cotes

Du Rhone

Rhine

And

Moselle

.

Champagne

1933

Great

Great (c)

Great

Great

Great

(?)

1932

Poor

Poor

Poor

Poor

Fair

Poor

1931

Fair

Good

Poor

Poor

Very good

Fair

1930

Poor

Poor

Fair (c)

Fair

Good

Fair

1929

Great

Great

Great

Great

Great

Very good

1928

Great (a)

Great

Great (a)

Great (a)

Very good

Great

1927

Poor

Good

Poor

Poor

Fair (c)

Poor

1926

Great

Very good

Great (a)

Great (a)

Poor

Great

1925

Fair

Fair

Poor

Fair

Good

Poor

1924

Great

Very good

Good

Good

Poor

Good

1923

Very good

Good

Great

Great (b)

Good

Very good

1922

Fair

Good

Poor

Fair

Poor

Poor

1921

Good

Great

Very good (b)

Good

Greatest

Great

1920

Great

Fair

Fair

Good

Good (c)

Very good

1919

Great

Good

Great

Great

Fair

Very good

1918

Fair

Good

Fair

Fair

Poor

Fair

1917

Good

Very good

Poor

Poor

Good

Great

1916

Very good

Good

Fair

Poor

Poor

Poor

1915

Fair

Fair

Great

Great

Good

Great

Courtesy of Bellows & Co., Inc., Wine Merchants, New York.

(a) For laying down.

(b) For immediate consumption.

(c) With certain exceptions.

White Burgundies are dry, with one or two exceptions. The term "dry" denotes a "less sweet" wine. Rieslings and Chablis, for example, are dryer than Barsac or Sauterne. However, there is no fixed standard of dryness for all Chablis or all Rieslings. It is a relative matter that varies not only with the type and brand but with the particular years of growth. Depend on your wine merchant for detailed advice.

In addition to Bordeaux and Burgundy, Anjou, Alsace, and the Rhone valley produce excellent French wines. The best German wines are white and should be chilled. Italian wines are heavier than either French or German, more heady. Nearly every country in Europe grows grapes and makes wine. Though France, Germany and Italy are the great wine exporting countries, the others ship their choicest varieties to the rest of the wine drinking world. Our domestic wines cannot be charted reliably as yet. We have some very fine vineyards and need only time to ripen our pressings and to establish uniform standards. Young wine is suitable for daily use, but fine wines must be ripened under expert supervision for eight or more years before they attain their full glory.

Fortified wines include sherry, madeira and port. Brandy has been added to the natural wine. This increase in alcoholic content prolongs their keeping qualities and permits storage in upright positions.

Champagne needs no introduction. By complicated processes, the wine is aerated and the corking and recorking is a momentous and difficult technique.

Wine Sequence (or Service Sequence) - Wines reverse the usual order of hospitality. Your most august wine should be accorded the last place if you are serving more than one kind. The theorists hold that your wine tasting ability is not toned up to a proper appreciation of the unrivaled grandeur of a fine wine at the beginning of a dinner.

Englishmen customarily serve sherry with clear soups but Frenchmen consider that the sherry is too vivid a wine to precede the dry white wine that accompanies the entree or fish.

Never serve a sweet wine before a dry one, nor a rich, fruity Burgundy before a claret.

In serving two wines, select a rather dry white wine to accompany your fish or entree and a red wine for your meat course.

In serving three wines, the following make the best combinations:

A. White, red, Champagne

B. White, red, white

C. White, red, red.

In the case of "B," the second white wine should be sweet. In the case of "C," the greater of the red wines comes second.

Champagne is served with the dessert if several wines are provided.

Liqueurs are served with coffee in the drawing room or in the dining room at the close of dinner. Cognac is the most popular. However, Benedictine, Cointreau, Chartreuse and Creme de Menthe have many devoted admirers. Englishmen often drink port at the close of dinner.

Italians and Frenchmen habitually dilute their ordinary red wine with water for a daily beverage. Never add ice or very icy water to wine, for the sudden chilling ruins its flavor.

The Amount to Serve - Wine is best appreciated when it is drunk in moderation, as a food, as a pleasure and not as a thirst quencher or stimulant. Plan a total allowance of a half bottle to each guest. Thus a table of eight will require two bottles of each of the principal wines or four bottles if you are serving only one variety. However if you are ending dinner with a sweet wine, a Chateau d'Yqem, for example, one bottle should be ample.

Though it is sometimes convenient to serve one large and one half-size bottle, you will notice that the smaller bottles lack some of the fine qualities of the larger ones.

Try to gage the amount required for your dinner with rather nice exactitude, especially in the case of Champagne. Once iced, then warmed and re-iced at a later date, Champagne is nearly ruined, and other wines suffer to a lesser degree.

It may be pertinent to add that the larger the group of guests the more each one tends to consume.

Temperature - Broadly speaking, all red wines should be served at room temperature and all white wines chilled. The change in temperature from that of the storage space should be accomplished gradually, as sudden chilling or warming harms all wine.

Red wines should never be drunk cold. Fine red Bordeaux and Burgundies have scarcely any bouquet at a temperature that chills the hands. Red Bordeaux, or claret, is best at a temperature of 70°-75° F., approximately room temperature. If you keep your wines in a cool storage place - 5 5 ° F. is ideal for storing - bring the claret to the dining room several hours before service time so that it may warm gradually. Never insert the bottle in hot water or put it near heat to hasten this process. Red Burgundy may be served slightly cooler than the other red wines. It loses its numbness speedily after it is poured into the glasses and by holding the bowl of the glass in the palm of the hand, to warm it further, the guest savors its expanding bouquet before tasting it.

Beaujolais, Arbois, Chinon and a few other red wines, with much bouquet and little body, are best drunk cool; they are exceptions to the general rule.

White wines should be drunk cool or chilled. The sweeter the wine, the longer it takes to chill it. Dry white wines cool quickly and a dry champagne quickest of all. On the other hand, a sweet sauterne takes a couple of hours in a mechanical refrigerator to reach its ideal temperature of 40° F. A half hour to an hour is ample refrigeration storage to cool white Burgundies, Rhone wines and the like.

All sweet white wines, all sparkling wines and some dry wines should be thoroughly chilled. They should approximate 40° F. This chilling is best accomplished by the use of an ice bucket, at least when the wine reaches the table. The first cooling may be done by laying the bottles, horizontally, of course, in the mechanical refrigerator. But wines, once iced, lose their grandeur if slightly warmed, and if they are allowed to stand outside a casing of ice for even ten minutes, the result may be disastrous. You can hasten even icing by turning your bottle in the ice bucket, which should be deep enough so that the entire bottle, except the very top, may be surrounded by ice.