Mr. Gibson, in an interesting article on "Mushrooms," published in "Harper's Magazine" for August, 1894, calls attention to the vast amount of wholesome and nutritious food that lies at the door of every country dweller. City people pay at least a dollar a pound for mushrooms, which are served at the finest dinners, and are considered as among the best articles for use in high-class cooking. Therefore, why should they be scorned or overlooked by those who can have them for the gathering? Neglect to use them seems equal in wastefulness to the practice of some country butchers, who throw away calves' heads, brains, sweetbreads, fresh tongues, etc., because the people have not learned their value. A French family who moved into a western town reported that the cost of living there was nominal, because the foods which they most prized, not being recognized as belonging on the list of comestibles, were given away by the butchers as food for dogs. Mushrooms are very distinctive in feature, and by the aid of descriptions given in books and colored charts, one can easily learn the edible varieties which grow in his neighborhood. By taking no risks in eating those not perfectly recognized, there is no danger of being poisoned. It is not thought difficult to learn varieties of the rose, nor to discriminate between the poison and the innocuous ivy. The form, color, and habitat of mushrooms make them equally easy to recognize. Care should be taken, however, to avoid any mushroom which is old or partly decayed, as its condition then is analogous to that of putrid meat. In their season the edible fungi grow in great profusion; they are nitrogenous, containing the same nutritive elements as meat, and well serve as a substitute for it, giving a pleasant change to the limited bill of frugal fare. Mr. Gibson speaks of them as beefsteaks. They seem from circumstances, therefore, to have a place in the dietary of the poor as well as the rich. Receipts for cooking mushrooms are given on page 314.

It is sometimes thought to be an extravagance to serve a roast to a small family, because so much meat is left over. When there is no way known of presenting it again except as cold meat or as hash, it may indeed be disagreeable to have the same meat served four times. A good cook, however, served turkey acceptably at four dinners to a family of three persons in this way:

FIRST DAYS DINNER

10 lbs. turkey at 16 cents per lb...................

$1.60

1 quart sweet potatoes boiled.......................

.10

2 quarts apples (of which she used three for baked apple dumplings, sabayon sauce, page 446)............

.15

1 egg.............................................

.03

1 lemon..................................

.02

cup sugar.............................................................

.01

-

.06

Cost of first day's diner.....................................

$1.91

SECOND DAY'S DINNER

2 lbs. codfish, boiled...................................

.20

HOLLANDAISE SAUCE (page 281).

2 eggs.............................................

.06

lb. butter...............................

.08

lemon................................................................

.01

-

.15

6 croquettes made of one cupful of turkey meat.....

.00

SAUCE TO MIX THEM

cup milk..................................

.01

tablespoonful butter..........................

.01

1 egg...................................

.03

-

.05

tablespoonful flour (see croquettes, page 293).......................

1 pint cranberries..............................

.09

Sweet potatoes left from day before, cut in strips and browned (see page 206)..........................................

.00

BROWN BETTY PUDDING

Apples from day before.......................

.00

Molasses and crumbs.................

.05

-

.05

Cost of second dinner............................................

.54

THIRD DAY'S DINNER

Soup made from carcass of turkey............................

.00

CHICKEN SOUFFLE (page 190).

1 cup turkey meat...............................

.00

SAUCE TO MIX IT

1 tablespoonful butter........................

.02

1 cup milk.....................

.04

3 eggs.............................................

.09

Other ingredients................

.02

-

.17

BAKED MACARONI

lb. macaroni........................

.04

Cheese..................................

.05

-

.09

COTTAGE PUDDING

1 egg.............................................

.03

cup sugar.....................................

.01

cup milk......................................

.02

1 tablespoonful butter.............................

.03

Baking powder..............

.01

-

.10

chocolate sauce (page 447).

3 oz. chocolate.........................

.08

cup sugar................................................

.02

-

.10

Cost of thirs day's dinner..........................................................

.46

FOURTH DAY'S DINNER

1 codfish steak, 1 lb..................................

.10

4 smelts for garnishing...................

.10

-

.20

CHARTREUSE OF CHICKEN (page 190).

1 cup rice.................

.04

White sauce.........................

.07

What is left of turkey including giblets.............

.00

Boiled potatoes......................

.05

Scalloped tomatoes..................

.15

Salad of water-cresses...................

.05

Bread pudding................

.10

-

.46

Cost of fourth day's dinner...................

.66

First day.............................

$1.91

Second day..................

.54

Third day.................

.46

Fourth day..............................

.66

Extras for bread, seasonings, etc.............

.30

Total..................................

$3.87

Average per day..............................................................6 cents.

The turkey in this case gave three cupfuls of chopped meat after the dinner of the first day. Any kind of meat can be made into the same dishes, and will be liked if the meat is chopped very fine, is well seasoned, and made creamy by using enough sauce.