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The Century Cook Book | by Mary Ronald



This book contains directions for cooking in its various branches, from the simplest forms to high-class dishes and ornamental pieces; a group of New England dishes furnished by Susan Coolidge; and a few receipts of distinctively Southern dishes. It gives also the etiquette of dinner entertainments - how to serve dinners - table decorations, and many items relative to household affairs.

TitleThe Century Cook Book
AuthorMary Ronald
PublisherThe Century Co
Year1901
Copyright1895, The Century Co
AmazonThe Century Cook Book
Mary Ronald

"Now Good Digestion Wait On Appetite And Health On Both" - Macbeth.

The Century Co

"To be a good cook means the knowledge of all fruits, herbs, balms and spices, and of all that is healing and sweet in field and groves, and savory in meats; means carefulness, inventiveness, watchfulness, willingness and readiness of appliance. It means the economy of your great-grandmothers and the science of modern chemists. It means much tasting and no wasting. It means English thoroughness, French art and Arabian hospitality. It means, in fine, thai you are to be perfectly and always ladies (loaf-givers) and are to see that every one has something nice to eat." - Ruskin.

-Aphorisms - Brillat-Savarin
Les animaux se repaissent; Vhomme mange; Vhomme d' esprit seul sait manger. Dis moi ce que tu manges, je te dirai ce que tues. Le Createur, en dbligeant Vhomme a manger pour vivre, l'y invite pa...
-Weights And Measures
4 gills = 1 pint. 2 pints =1 quart 4 quarts = 1 gallon. 16 ounces = 1 pound. kitchen cupful = 1 gill. 1 kitchen cupful = pint or 2 gills. 4 kitchen cupfuls = 1 quart. 2 cupfuls of gran...
-Weights And Measures. Part 2
Baking MEATS. Time. Beef, ribs, rare............... per pound, 8 to 10 min. ...
-Weights And Measures. Part 3
Broiling Time. Steak, 1 inch thick 8 to 10 min. 1 10 to ...
-Preface
In France various honors are awarded to cooks. Accomplished chefs de cuisine are by compliment called cordon-bleu, which is an ancient and princely order. A successful culinary production takes the na...
-Part I. Dinner-Giving And The Etiquette Of Dinners
To feed were best at home; From thence, the sauce to meat is ceremony, Meeting were bare without it. - Shakspere. The Company A dinner party may be considered as holding the highest rank a...
-The Host And Hostess
The hostess should give her instructions for the details of the entertainment so explicitly that on the arrival of the guests she will have no care other than their pleasure. If she is nervous, has...
-Dinner-Giving Time And Dining-Room Temperature
Under these circumstances the discovery may possibly be made that an unfriendly person is more agreeable than was supposed, and a pleasanter relationship may be established. Two hours is the extrem...
-The Dinner Invitation
Invitations are sometimes sent out a month or three weeks in advance, but ordinarily two weeks is sufficient time to secure the guests one wishes to entertain. Courtesy requires a dinner invitation to...
-Dresses For Dinners
These dinners are generally quite as formal as the others, and require the same toilet. A woman's dinner dress should be decollete, and for a man evening dress is always de rigueur. The butler w...
-Arrival For Dinner
Guests are expected at the hour mentioned in the invitation, and should be as near that time as possible. In large cities, where distances are great and exact time difficult to calculate, a little gra...
-Precedence
The host then offers his right arm to the lady who is to sit at his right, and leads the way into the dining-room; the other couples follow in any order that is convenient. The hostess, with the gentl...
-Manner Of Serving Dinners
The custom of serving dinner a la Russe (dishes passed) has supplanted the form known as the English style, where the joints are carved on the table. This is for good reason, as the host cannot well f...
-Care Of China
Care should be taken that plates for the hot dishes are warm, but not hot, and that for the cold dishes they are not lukewarm. The plate holding the shell-fish is placed upon the one already on the...
-Clearing The Table
Before the dessert is served, all the plates, the small silver, the salt- and pepper-boxes, the hors d'oeuvres, and such glasses as will not be again used are removed; the crumbs are then taken off, a...
-Laying The Table
The Table A round or square table five feet across is a convenient size for ordinary use, giving ample room for six people, and leaving space for decoration. Large round tops are made to fit over e...
-The Order Of Laying The Table
After the interlining has been spread, the cloth should be laid with great care, making the center fold run perfectly straight with the room, and the cross fold again exactly divide the table at right...
-The Decoration
After the plates and small silver and cutlery are in position, the decorating of the table should proceed as far as possible. The position for everything can be best determined after the plates are la...
-Lights
The candlesticks, or candelabra, as the case may be, should be so placed as not to obstruct the views across the table. This may be determined by two persons taking seats on opposite sides of the tabl...
-The Sideboard
Everything that will be needed in serving the dinner should be convenient to hand. The plates to be warmed should be in the hot closet; those for the cold courses, the finger-bowls, extra small silver...
-Table Decoration
There is wide range for individual taste and artistic arrangement in table decoration, which is limited only by the resources at one's command. Pleasing effects of color are perhaps the first consi...
-Menu Of The "Al Fresco" Dinner
Soup Cream of Celery (colored green). Fish Brook Trout, Butter Sauce. Entree Mushrooms on Crusts. Boast. Saddle of Venison. Wild plum sauce. Saratoga potatoes. Green peas served in fontage...
-Courses
The order of the dinner service is soup, fish, flesh, fowl. These may be supplemented to any extent with entremets and entrees. Mets are the principal dishes. Entremets, the dishes served between the ...
-The Home Dinner
At the every-day or family dinner there will naturally be less elaboration in the decoration of the table, and fewer courses, than when the dinner is an occasion of entertainment, but so far as the ap...
-Serving The Informal Dinner
In laying the table for an informal dinner, where the carving is to be done on the table, a napkin to protect the cloth is spread at the carver's place. Very-pretty fancy pieces are made for this use,...
-Luncheon
The luncheon service does not differ materially from that of dinner. Lighter dishes are usually served, entrees taking the place of joints and roasts, and the soup or bouillon is served in cups instea...
-Menus For Luncheon
No. 1 Grape Fruit. Bouillon. Oyster Patties. Chops and Peas. Quail, Lettuce Salad. Ice-Cream. Cake. Tea. No. 2 Melon. Clams on Half-shell. Cold Salmon, Sauce Tartare. Filets Mignons,...
-The Five O'Clock Tea
A cup of tea at this time of the afternoon is usually gratefully accepted, and one is disappointed if it is made so badly that it is not drinkable. The young lady who presides at the tea table at an a...
-A Homily On Cooking
It is a trite saying that a thing worth doing at all is worth doing well, but, from the inefficiency of the large number of domestics who hold the office of cook, and from the acceptance of careless w...
-Cooking As A Pleasure And An Accomplishment
The common sayings about waste in American kitchens, dyspeptic results of American cooking, etc., reflect the opinion held by other nations of our culinary art, and though the judgment may be too seve...
-Economical Living
A very pleasant book called $10.00 Enough ex-plains how a family of two lived well on that sum per week, including house rent and wages of one servant. Mrs. Rorer says $2.00 per head a week is a lib...
-An Interesting Article On Mushrooms
Mr. Gibson, in an interesting article on Mushrooms, published in Harper's Magazine for August, 1894, calls attention to the vast amount of wholesome and nutritious food that lies at the door of ev...
-Wastefulness
As a rule the family life of America does not represent opulence, yet it has become a familiar saying that a French family could live on what an American family throws away. Again, it is said that in ...
-How To Utilize What Some Cooks Throw Away
Bread Trim such pieces of cut bread as will do for toast into uniform shape and serve at the next breakfast. Smaller pieces cut into croutons (page 81) for garnishing or for soup. Save unshapely pi...
-Emergencies
There is to-day such a variety of well-preserved foods that a store-closet provided with these articles may be almost the equivalent of a full larder. With such a resource the housekeeper can meet wit...
-Things To Remember
Eggs A dash of salt added to the whites of eggs makes them whip better. Not a speck of the yolk must get into the whites which are to be whipped. Fold the whipped whites into any mixture rath...
-Care Of Utensils
A very essential thing in doing nice cooking is to have clean utensils. The pans of a careless cook are encrusted outside and frequently inside with dry, hard grease, which ordinary washing will not r...
-Part II. Chapter I. Methods Of Cooking Explained. Boiling. Simmering
There is an erroneous impression that articles cook faster when the water is boiling violently, but this is not the case; the ebullition is caused by the escaping steam, which is lost heat, and the wa...
-Baking
The baking of many articles is a more important matter than the mixing. There are no definite tests for ovens, therefore one has to learn by experience and careful watching the capabilities or faults ...
-Roasting
Roasting is done before the fire, and should not be confused with baking, which is done in the oven. Roasted meats have a distinctly better flavor than baked ones. The latter are likely to taste of sm...
-Broiling
Meat cooked by broiling is exposed to a greater heat than in any other manner of cooking, and to prevent its burning, requires constant watching. Meats for broiling are cut thin, and much surface is e...
-Braising, Fricasseeing Or Sauteing
Braising Meat cooked by braising is shut in a closely-covered pot with a few slices of salt pork (laid under the meat to prevent its sticking to the pot), a mixture of vegetables, cut into dice, a ...
-Frying. Heating The Fat
Frying is cooking by immersion in very hot fat. The success of frying depends upon the fat being sufficiently hot, and enough fat being used to completely cover the articles cooked in it. A kettle for...
-How To Prepare Articles For Prying By Covering Them With Egg And Crumbs
All scraps of bread should be saved for crumbs, as directed on page 51, the crusts being separated from the white part, then dried, rolled, and sifted. The brown crumbs are good for the first coating,...
-Larding
Larding is simply drawing small pieces of salt pork through the surface of meat. It is easily done, and so much improves lean, dry pieces of meat as to well repay the trouble. The pork for larding is ...
-Daubing
Molding. Cutting Lardoons Daubing is cutting through the entire thickness of the meat in several places and inserting lardoons of salt pork. The cut is made with a thin, sharp knife. Boning ...
-Measuring. Fowls. Meats. Measuring-cup
Exact measurements are an important factor in the success of cooking, therefore a definite understanding of what a cupful or a spoonful means is requisite. A cupful means one half pint. A tin cup hold...
-Stirring And Beating
These two methods should not be confused. The object of stirring is to mix the materials. The spoon is held on the bottom of the dish, and the materials rubbed and pressed together as much as possible...
-How To Make Caramel
Caramel is used to color soup, gravies, etc., and serves also as a flavoring for desserts. It must be used with care for coloring, as it also sweetens. The flavor of caramel depends upon the degree to...
-How To Make Roux
Put one tablespoonful of butter into a saucepan. When it bubbles add one tablespoonful of flour and let them cook together for a few minutes, stirring all the time. If it is to be used as thickening f...
-How To Marinate
Make a mixture in the proportion of three tablespoonfuls of vinegar to two of oil, one teaspoonful of salt, one quarter teaspoonful of pepper, one bay-leaf, one teaspoonful onion juice, and a sprig of...
-Seasoning And Flavoring
Condiments The savoriness of a dish can often be much enhanced by adding a few drops of Worcestershire sauce, of mushroom or tomato catsup, of kitchen bouquet, by a few celery seeds, a bay-leaf, or...
-Croutons And Croustades
Croutons or crusts are used in pea, bean, and all cream soups, for garnishing all kinds of stewed dishes, and for any dish with which toast would be acceptable. When cut large and filled they are call...
-Chartreuse
Chartreuse is a liqueur made by the monks of the French monastery of Grande Chartreuse; but a class of dishes has also been given this name, where two or more foods are used one of which conceals the ...
-Chapter II. Soups
As nothing is easier than making good soups, they should be the first lesson in cooking. They are one of the most nutritious and inexpensive foods presented, and have a very wide range, extending f...
-How To Make Meat Stock
Stock made of meat alone will keep better than where vegetables are used. In warm weather it is well to have it so prepared. Common Stock (Pot-Au-Feu) For this stock pieces of fresh or cooke...
-Thickening For Soups
Roux (see page 79) makes the best thickening for soups which are not clear, using brown or white roux according to the color of the soup. Thin the roux with a little soup, so it will be smooth before ...
-Noodles For Soups
Several dishes may be made from noodles. To three eggs (slightly beaten) mixed with two tablespoonfuls of water and a little salt, add enough flour to make a stiff dough; work it well for fifteen o...
-Garnishes For Soups
Royale. A Custard To Serve With Consomme 2 yolks. 1 entire egg. 1/3 teaspoonful of salt. Dash of cayenne. cupful of beef stock. Beat the eggs well, but not to a froth. Add one third o...
-Broths. Chicken Broth
1 fowl. 4 quarts of cold water. cupful of rice. Salt and pepper. Clean the fowl carefully; wash it with a wet cloth; cut it into pieces and remove the fat. Place the joints in a saucepan wi...
-How To Make Soups Bouillon
(3 Pints. Time, 5 Hours) 3 lbs. of beef cut from under side of round and chopped to a mince. 3 quarts of cold water. 1 onion. carrot. 1 sprig of parsley. 2 sticks of celery. 1 b...
-How To Make Consomme
4 lbs. lower part round of beef. 4 lbs. knuckle of veal. 2 tablespoonfuls of butter. 6 quarts of cold water. 1 large onion. carrot. 3 stalks of celery. 1 tablespoonful of salt. 2 spri...
-How To Make Consomme. Part 2
White Soup 1 pint of white stock. 1 pint of milk or cream. 1 tablespoonful of butter. Salt and pepper to taste. Chicken, veal, or celery (cut into small dice), or rice. 1 tablespoonful of flo...
-How To Make Consomme. Part 3
Vegetable Soup To one quart of common stock add one pint of parboiled mixed vegetables cut into small dice. Simmer until the vegetables are tender but not pasty. Season with salt, pepper, and one t...
-How To Make Consomme. Part 4
Calfs-Head Or Mock-Turtle Soup Make a brown roux by putting in a saucepan one tablespoonful of butter, let it brown, add two tablespoonfuls of flour, and let that brown; then add, slowly at first, ...
-How To Make Tomato Bisque
can of tomatoes. 1 quart of milk. 2 tablespoonfuls of butter. 1 tablespoonful of corn-starch. 1 teaspoonful of salt. saltspoonful of pepper. 1 saltspoonful of soda. Dash of cayenne. ...
-Cream Of Asparagus; Cream Of Green Peas; Cream Of String Beans; Cream Of Spinach; Cream Of Corn; Cream Of Celery
These soups are very delicate, and are much esteemed. They are all made in the same way. The vegetable is boiled until soft, and is then pressed through a sieve. A pint of the vegetable pulp is dilute...
-How To Make Chowders. Potato Chowder
6 good-sized potatoes. lb. salt pork. 1 onion. 1 tablespoonful butter. 1 tablespoonful flour. 1 pint milk or cream. 1 pint water. 1 tablesp'ful chopped parsley. 1 teaspoonful...
-Chapter III. Fish
Cooking. Freshness. Dressing It is essential that fish should be perfectly fresh, thoroughly cleaned, and carefully cooked. If underdone it is not eatable; if cooked too long it loses flavor and be...
-How To Cook Fish
Court Bouillon Court bouillon is used for boiling fresh-water fish or others which are without much flavor. It may be prepared beforehand, and used several times, or the vegetables may be added at ...
-How To Broil Fish
Fish to be broiled are split down the back. After being washed and well dried, they should be rubbed with oil or butter, or the skin floured, to keep from sticking. The broiler should be made hot and ...
-How To Saute Fish
Small or pan fish, and fish cut into slices, are often sauted. After the fish is washed and dried, dredge it with salt and pepper, and roll in flour, then dip in egg and roll in bread crumbs, cracker ...
-How To Fry Fish
Fish to be fried are first well washed and dried, then dredged with salt, pepper, and flour, then dipped in egg, and rolled in bread or cracker crumbs. The fish should be completely incased in the egg...
-How To Cook Whitebait
Wash the whitebait with great care, and dry well by rubbing them in a napkin. Roll them in flour, using enough to entirely cover them. Toss them on a sieve to shake off the loose flour. Place them in ...
-How To Cook Halibut
Boiled Halibut Steaks Lay two chicken halibut steaks into a shallow stew pan, sufficiently large to allow them to lie side by side. Cover them with court bouillon or with hot water, and add a slice...
-How To Make Scalloped Fish
2 pounds halibut or any white fish, boiled with 1 slice onion, 1 stalk celery, 1 sprig parsley, 6 peppercorns, 4 cloves, 1 bay-leaf, Juice of one-half a lemon, 1 cupful white sauce, Mas...
-How To Make Fish Chops
1 pound or 1 pint of fish. 1 teaspoonful of salt. teaspoonful of pepper. teaspoonful of onion juice. 1 cupful of milk or cream. 1 tablespoonful of butter. 2 rounded tablespoonfuls flour. ...
-Fillets Baked With Custard Or Tomatoes
Remove the fillets from any white fish, dredge them with salt and pepper, and lay them in a baking pan, one on top of the other. Beat two eggs, and add to them; 2 cupfuls of milk, 1 saltspoonful of...
-How To Make Fish Pudding
1 pound or pint boiled halibut. cupful of cream or milk. 1 tablespoonfuls of butter. tablespoonful of flour. 1 teaspoonfuls salt. teaspoonful pepper. teaspoonful onion juice. 2 eggs. P...
-How To Make Fish Timbale
Cut one pound of very fresh white uncooked fish into small pieces, put it in a mortar, and pound until the fiber is well separated from the meat, then press it through a puree sieve. To every cupful o...
-Fish Dish For A Pink Luncheon
Cut halibut or any firm white fish into cutlets three quarters of an inch thick, two inches wide, and three inches long. Dredge with salt, pepper, and paprica. Lay them in a pan so they do not touch, ...
-How To Cook Shad
Shad may be broiled, and spread with maitre d' h6tel sauce; stuffed and baked, and served with brown sauce; or it may be boiled and served with Hollandaise, Bechamel, or egg sauce. Planked Shad...
-How To Cook Salt Mackerel
Soak the mackerel for twelve hours or more, with the skin side up, and change the water several times. Simmer it for fifteen or twenty minutes; and, if convenient, have in the water one teaspoonful of...
-How To Cook Salmon
Put salmon into hot water to preserve its color, and simmer in acidulated water or in court bouillon, as is the rule for all fish. The middle cuts are preferable where a small quantity only is needed....
-How To Cook Oysters
Oysters are out of season during the months of May, June, July, and August. The rule is to use oysters only in the months that have the letter r in the name. How To Serve On Half-Shell When serv...
-How To Cook Oysters. Continued
Panned Oysters Heat a baking-pan very hot. Put into it a tablespoonful of butter; then the oysters, which have been well drained. Let them cook in hot oven until browned. Have ready some toast cut ...
-How To Cook Clams
Clams are served raw on the half shell during the months that oysters are out of season. Little Neck clams are best for this purpose, and the smaller they are the better. The manner of serving them is...
-How To Cook Lobsters
Lobsters are in season from March to November. They are in the market all the year, but during the off months they are light and stringy. Their size increases with their age; therefore a small, heavy ...
-How To Cook Lobsters. Part 2
Lobster Farci 2 cupf uls of boiled lobster meat. 1 cupful of milk or cream. 2 tablespoonfuls of butter. 1 tablespoonful of flour. Yolks of 3 hard-boiled eggs. 2 tablespoonfuls of bread ...
-How To Cook Lobsters. Part 3
Lobster Stew Put into a saucepan one tablespoonful of butter and one teaspoonful of chopped onion. Before it takes color add one tablespoonful of flour, and cook, but not brown. Then add slowly one...
-How To Cook Crabs
Crabs are in season during the months of May, June, July, and August. They may be had at other times, but are then light and stringy. Soft-shell crabs are best in July and August. Like lobsters, crabs...
-Chapter IV. Meats
Slow Cooking Long, slow cooking breaks down the fiber of meat, and so makes it more tender. Whatever method of cooking is employed, this fact should be remembered. Many of the tough pieces are the ...
-Meats. Part 2
Beef A La Mode Use six or seven pounds of the upper round of beef for this dish. (It is very good cold when properly cooked.) The success depends upon very slow cooking. The vegetables give it a di...
-Meats. Part 3
How To Buy A Fillet A profitable way to obtain a fillet is to buy a large cut of the sirloin, remove the tenderloin, and have the top cut into two or more roasting pieces. Beef will keep for some t...
-How To Make Hamburg Steaks
Chop one pound of lean raw meat very fine, remove all the fiber possible. To the mince add; tablespoonful of onion juice. teaspoonful salt. teaspoonful pepper. Dash of nutmeg. 1 egg. ...
-How To Make Beef Pie
Lay in a pie dish a few thin slices of onion; then a layer of cold cooked beef cut very thin. Dredge with a little flour, pepper, and salt; fill the dish with these articles in alternate layers, and a...
-How To Roast Beef
Time for cooking rib roast rare eight to ten minutes per pound; time for cooking rolled roast rare, ten to twelve minutes per pound. To roast beef on a spit before the fire is unquestionably the be...
-How To Make Inside Flank
Take the piece of meat called the inside flank; wipe it clean with a wet cloth; carefully remove the skin and fat and lay it flat on a board; moisten three quarters of a cupful of crumbs with stock; a...
-How To Make Ragout Of Beef
Cut two pounds of the upper round of beef into inch squares; dredge them with salt and pepper, and roll them in flour. Put into a saucepan some butter and some drippings, or a little suet, and let it ...
-How To Cook Beefsteak
Some one has said, There is as much difference between beefsteaks as between faces, and a man of taste can find as much variety in a dinner at the Beefsteak Club as at the most plentifully-served tab...
-How To Cook Corned Beef
Put corned beef into cold water; using enough to cover it well; let it come slowly to the boiling-point; then place where it will simmer only; allow thirty minutes or more to each pound. It is improve...
-How To Cook Hash
Unless for brown hash, or corned beef hash, potato is not used. Chop the meat to a fine mince. Put a tablespoonful of butter into a frying-pan with one slice of onion; remove the onion when cooked, an...
-How To Cook Mutton
The Eats And Cooking Of Mutton Mutton should be hung for some days before being used. The leg may be either boiled or roasted; the saddle always roasted; the shoulder boned, stuffed and roasted; th...
-How To Cook Mutton. Part 2
Rolled Loin (Crown Roast) Have the butcher cut a full loin, split the bone between the chops, trim the rib bones as for French chops, and chop them off to a uniform length; then roll the loin backw...
-How To Cook Mutton. Part 3
Ragout Of Mutton Or Lamb One and one half pounds of the neck of mutton or lamb cut into pieces one inch square. 1 tablespoonful of butter. 1 tablespoonful of flour. 1 onion. 1 carrot. ...
-How To Cook Mutton. Part 4
Chops In Paper Gases Put into a frying-pan some slices of salt pork; when tried out, lay in neatly trimmed and seasoned lamb or veal chops; let them saute until half cooked; remove the chops, and t...
-How To Cook Veal
The flesh of veal should be pink and firm, the bones hard. If it has a blue tinge and is flabby, it has been killed too young, and is unwholesome. Like lamb, it must be used while perfectly fresh and ...
-How To Cook Veal. Continued
A Plain Pot-Pie Cut veal, chicken, or beef into pieces; put them with strips of pork into boiling water and cook until tender; season with salt, pepper, and butter. There should be enough liquid to...
-How To Cook Liver And Bacon
Cut the liver into slices one half inch thick; lay them in boiling water for a few minutes, then dry and cover them with flour and a little pepper and salt. Lay in a hot frying-pan very thin slices of...
-How To Cook Liver And Bacon. Continued
Calf's Heart Wash the heart, but do not let it soak, or stand in water. Fill it with a stuffing made of minced meat or of bread, either one of them seasoned with onion, sage, thyme, marjoram, peppe...
-How To Cook Pork
Salt pork and bacon should be kept always at hand; the former for larding, spreading in thin slices over baked meats, poultry, and birds, and various other uses as directed in many receipts. Bacon is ...
-Chapter V. Poultey And Game
To judge the age of a chicken, touch the end of the breastbone. If it is still cartilaginous, and bends easily from side to side, the meat of the chicken will be tender. If the cartilage has hardened ...
-Poultey And Game. Part 2
How To Bone A Fowl Wash and singe the fowl; take off the head and legs, and remove the tendons as directed for drawing. When a fowl is to be boned it is not drawn. The work of boning is not difficu...
-Poultey And Game. Part 3
Forcemeat, For Stuffing Boned Fowls Use the meat of another fowl, or veal, or pork, or a mixture. Chop them fine, and add to the minced meat one cupful of bread or cracker crumbs and, if convenient...
-How To Cook Chicken
Boasted Chicken A roasted chicken may be stuffed or not. If stuffing is used it should only half fill the chicken. Truss it as directed above, or use skewers, doubling a cord across the back and ar...
-How To Cook Chicken. Part 2
Boiled Chicken A chicken too old to roast is very good when boiled. Truss the chicken firmly. It is well also to tie it in a piece of cheesecloth, to keep it in good shape. It may be stuffed or not...
-How To Cook Chicken. Part 3
Fried Chicken Cut a tender chicken in pieces; dip the pieces in water; sprinkle them with salt and pepper, and roll them in flour; saute them in a tablespoonful of lard or butter, browning both sid...
-How To Make Chicken Loaf
Boil a fowl until the meat falls from the bones. Strain, and put the liquor again in the saucepan; reduce it to one and a half pints, and add one quarter box of soaked gelatine. Lay a few slices of ha...
-How To Make English Chicken Pie (Cold)
Take two tender chickens, and cut them up as for frying. Put them into a large saucepan with two and a half quarts of water; add a bouquet made of sweet marjoram, basil, parsley, three bay-leaves, spr...
-How To Make Chicken Souffle
1 tablespoonful of butter. 1 tablespoonful of flour. 1 tablespoonful of chopped parsley. 1 cupful of milk. 1 cupful of minced chicken. teaspoonful of salt. 3 eggs. 10 drops of onion juice. Das...
-Stuffed Chicken Or Turkey Legs
Carefully remove the tendons from the drumsticks as directed in drawing (page 180); remove the bone, all but about an inch and a half at the small end, and remove any remaining sinews. Stuff the leg w...
-How To Cook Turkey
The rules given for dressing and cooking chickens apply also to turkeys. Turkey can be substituted for chicken in any of the receipts given. A young turkey will have smooth black legs and white skin. ...
-Turkey Galantine Or Boned Turkey
Select a young fat hen turkey. Bone it as directed, page 181; spread the boned meat on the table, the skin side down. Equalize the meat as well as possible by paring it off at the thick parts, and lay...
-How To Cook Game
Roast Goose Green geese about four months old are the best, as they get very tough when much older. If there is any doubt about the age of the goose, it is better to braise than to roast it. It can...
-How To Cook Game. Continued
Potted Pigeons (Dark Meat) Unless pigeons are young they should be braised or stewed in broth. Truss them carefully; place slices of bacon on the bottom of a stew-pan; lay in the pigeons side by si...
-Chapter VI. Vegetables
General Directions The simplest way of cooking vegetables is usually the best; but all kinds need seasoning or to be served with a sauce. They should be cooked only until tender. The time depends u...
-How To Cook Potatoes
Boiled Potatoes Wash the potatoes well; take off only a thin paring, and drop them at once into cold water to prevent their discoloring. Have them of uniform size, or cut the larger ones into piece...
-How To Cook Potatoes. Part 2
Potato Croquettes To two cupfuls of well-seasoned mashed potatoes add the beaten yolks of two eggs, a tablespoonful of chopped parsley, one and a half tablespoonfuls of butter (if none has been use...
-How To Cook Potatoes. Part 3
Stuffed Potatoes Select potatoes of equal size and shape, wash and scrub them well and bake them. While they are still hot cut a piece off the top of each, and with a spoon scoop out the potato, le...
-How To Cook Tomatoes
Stewed Tomatoes If fresh tomatoes are used remove the skins by placing them on boiling water a few minutes; they will then peel off easily. Cut them in pieces, and stew in a granite-ware saucepan u...
-How To Cook Peas Or Beans
Green Peas The flavor of peas, and also the time required for cooking them, depends very much upon their freshness. Put them into salted boiling water, and do not cover the saucepan; boil ten to tw...
-How To Cook Spinach
Put a half peck of spinach into cold water to freshen; pick i over carefully, removing all the wilted and yellow leaves. Pas it through five changes of water to free it from grit. Put it in a saucepan...
-How To Cook Asparagus
Scrape the stalks; let them stand in cold water for half an hour; tie them again into a bundle and make them uniform in length; put them into salted boiling water and cook about twenty minutes or unti...
-How To Cook Cabbage
Cabbage. Cauliflower. Brussels Sprouts. Kohlrabi Four vegetables are the result of the cabbage plant by cultivation. As the rose changes its character under the hand of the floriculturist, so it is...
-How To Cook Cauliflower
Trim off the outside leaves and cut the stalk even with the flower. Let it stand upside down in cold salted water for fifteen or twenty minutes to take out any insects there may be in it. Put it into ...
-How To Cook Egg-Plant
Cut the egg-plant into slices one quarter of an inch thick, after removing the skin. Sprinkle the slices with salt. Pile them one upon another on the back of a dish. Place on them a plate holding a we...
-How To Cook Celery, Carrots And Turnips
Celery Stewed Cut the celery into pieces one inch long. Boil in salted water until tender; drain and mix with a white sauce. Celery Au Jus Cut heads of celery into pieces six inches long,...
-Macedoine Of Vegetables
Cut a carrot and turnip into half inch dice, or with small vegetable-cutters cut them into fancy shapes or into small balls. Mix them in about equal proportions with green peas, flageolet beans, strin...
-Dried Beans. Boiled, Baked, Puree, Croquettes
Wash the beans, and soak them over night. Boil them slowly until tender, changing the water several times. They are improved in flavor by boiling with them a small piece of salt pork, a bay-leaf, and ...
-How To Cook Onions
Put them in salted boiling water, and cook until tender; drain, and pour over them a white sauce, or melted butter, pepper, and salt. If browned onions are wanted for garnishing place them, after they...
-How To Cook Corn
Corn On The Ear Strip off the husk and silk. Put into boiling water; cover, and boil ten to fifteen minutes. Do not salt the water, as it hardens the hull. Corn Mock Oysters Cut down thro...
-How To Cook Artichokes
Cut the stems off even with the leaves; remove the hardest bottom leaves, and cut off the top ones straight across, leaving an opening. Take out the inside, or choke. Wash well, and place upside down ...
-Chapter VII. Farinaceous Foods Used As Vegetables
Receipts For Macaroni And Cereals. To Boil Rice Wash the rice well, and drain it. It must be washed in several waters, and until the floury coating, which is usually on rice, is all removed. This f...
-Macaroni. General Directions
The best macaroni is smooth, has a fine, close grain and clear yellow color. It is made of flour and water only, and when cooked needs the seasoning of a good sauce. It is generally mixed with cheese,...
-Sauce For Macaroni
Sauce For Macaroni, For Rissotto, And For Polenta Put into a saucepan one and a half tablepoonfuls of butter. Add a small onion chopped fine and a half clove of garlic. Cook until all are browned; ...
-Cereals
Oatmeal Porridge Oatmeal is ground in different grades of coarseness, and some brands are partly cooked before they are put up for sale; therefore the time for cooking varies, and it is better to o...
-Chapter VIII. A Group Of Receipts From A New England Kitchen
(SUPPLIED BY SUSAN COOLIDGE) Many of the receipts in this little group have never before appeared in print. They are copies from old grandmother and great-grandmother receipt-books, tested by gen...
-A Group Of Receipts From A New England Kitchen. Continued
Fish And Oysters Make a pint or more of white sauce, with flour, butter, and hot milk, carefully stirred till smooth and thick. Pick to fine bits two quarts of cold boiled codfish, and add one pint...
-Fore And Beans. New Hampshire
Soak a pint of small white beans over night. In the morning pour off the water, pour on a pint of cold water, and set at the back of the range to simmer slowly for three quarters of an hour. Pla...
-How To Cook New England Corned Beef
If a round of corned beef is to be eaten cold, as is often the case, it should be carefully and slowly boiled, and left in the pot till the next day. The soaking in the water in which it has been boil...
-How To Cook New England Corned Beef. Continued
Thin Indian Bread. Vermont Mix together two cupfuls of meal, a tablespoonful of lard, and a teaspoonful of salt; scald with boiling water. Thin it with a large cupful of cold milk and two well-beat...
-Easy Pie-Crust
Three quarters of a pint of lard, three quarters of a pint of butter, three quarters of a pint of iced water with a teaspoonful of salt dissolved in it, a pint and a half of flour sifted twice through...
-Easy Pie-Crust. Part 2
Blueberry Pudding. Rhode Island Line a deep pudding-dish with slices of buttered bread. Fill this with alternate layers of whortleberries or blueberries, and granulated sugar. Squeeze the juice of ...
-Easy Pie-Crust. Part 3
Prune Jelly, With Almonds One pound of prunes. One half box of Coxe's gelatine. Soak the prunes over night, and stew till tender in the water in which they have soaked. Remove the stones, and sweet...
-Chapter IX. Part I. Distinctively Southern Dishes
The Cornmeal. The Hoe The dishes in which the South excel, and which may be called distinctive to that section, are those made of cornmeal, of gumbo or okra, and those seasoned with sassafras powde...
-Part I. Distinctively Southern Dishes. Continued
Southern Way Of Cooking Rice Wash the rice thoroughly through several waters, using the hand. Put it into a saucepan with a pint of water and a half teaspoonful of salt to each cupful of rice. Let ...
-Part II. Very Inexpensive Dishes
Cost Of Living The following receipts are furnished by a lady who for many years solved the problem of providing nourishment for a family of three persons upon a very small income. The average expe...
-How To Prepare Shin Of Beef
Take a slice about one inch thick, cut toward the smaller end of the shin, so that the little round bone in the center is quite small. This is fairly manageable, and can by careful cooking be rendered...
-How To Cook Round Steak
Round steak can be used instead of shin for both these receipts, but costs just double the price. It requires far less cooking and calls for less care, and if carefully and slowly stewed for one hour ...
-Menus
Sometimes, where great economy must be practised, and the sum allowed for the entire meal for three people is only sixty cents, it is difficult to remember just such accessories in the way of vegetabl...
-Menus. Part 2
Dinner No. 3 Stewed Carrots, Chops With Parsley Sauce, Cream Potatoes, Apple Dumplings. Chops cut from the shoulder of mutton are cheaper than either neck or loin chops, and are as good, perhaps...
-Menus. Part 3
Dinner No. 6 Fried Sweet Potatoes, Breast Of Mutton, Caper Sauce, String-Beans (Ten Cents A Can), Apple Pie. Breast of mutton is the cheapest of all mutton, and being very fat, is considered unp...
-Part III. Miscellaneous Receipts Sterilized Milk
The subject of bacteria in foods has of late become a matter of careful scientific study, and the fact has been established that milk is one of the most subtle of disease-carriers. Hence every careful...
-Chapter X. Eggs
There is a best way of doing everything, even if it be to boil an egg. - Emerson. How To Judge Of Freshness And How To Preserve Eggs The variety of purposes which eggs serve, the many ways of co...
-How To Make Boiled Eggs
Soft-boiled eggs should have the albumen creamy, not hard. To obtain this, slow heat is required. Hence receipt No. 1 is recommended. No. 2 gives a soft egg, but the time is difficult to determine exa...
-How To Make Poached Eggs
The white of a poached egg should be a white, translucent, jelly-like mass. To obtain this result, which makes it an easily digested food, it must cook very slowly, the water never reaching the boilin...
-How To Make Fried Or Scrambled Eggs
Fried Eggs Place a little butter in a very clean frying-pan. When it bubbles, turn in the eggs, one at a time, and keep the pan where the heat is not sufficient to blacken the butter. If the eggs a...
-How To Make Omelette
Plain French Omelet An omelet is the most difficult to prepare of any egg dish. It requires some practice to give it the right shape (which is high in the center and pointed at the ends), to have i...
-Shirred Eggs. Sur Le Plat. Au Miroir. Cocotte
For this dish (sur le plat) individual china dishes are generally used, although a dish holding several eggs will do. Butter the dishes; break into each one an egg; sprinkle a little salt on the white...
-How To Make Molded Eggs. A La Polignac
Butter well some individual timbale molds; chop some parsley very fine, and powder the inside of the buttered molds with it. To do this, place a teaspoonful of the parsley in a buttered mold, cover it...
-How To Make Curried Or Stuffed Eggs
Curried Eggs Boil the eggs hard; remove the shells carefully as directed (page 262), and drop them in hot water to keep warm until ready to use. Mold some boiled rice into a form resembling a nest....
-Other Ways Of Serving Hard-Boiled Eggs
(Luncheon Dishes) No. 1. Cut hard-boiled eggs in two lengthwise. Arrange them symmetrically on a flat dish, and pour over them a giblet sauce made of chicken or turkey gravy. No. 2. Cut hard-boi...
-Chapter XI.Sauces
There are many sauces besides hunger. General Directions The basis of most sauces is butter and flour cooked together, which makes a roux or thickening. If for a white sauce, the flour is not ...
-How To Make Sauces
Egg Sauce For Boiled Fish To a pint, or two cupfuls, of white sauce, add three hard-boiled eggs cut into slices or small dice, and, if liked, a teaspoonful of chopped parsley. Caper Sauce ...
-How To Make Sauces. Part 2
Espagnole (Chops, Cutlets, Croquettes, And Seasoning For Other Sauces) 2 cupfuls of stock or consomme. 1 tablespoonful of gelatine. 4 tablespoonfuls of butter. 4 tablespoonfuls of flour. ...
-How To Make Sauces. Part 3
Mustard Sauce (Corned Beef, Broiled And Roasted Meats) Make a roux of one tablespoonful of butter and one teaspoonful of flour. Add to it; 1 cupful of stock. 1 tablespoonful of French must...
-How To Make Sauces. Part 4
Maitre D'Hotel Sauce (Broiled Fish And Steaks) 2 tablespoonfuls of butter. 1 tablespoonful of chopped parsley. 1 tablespoonful of lemon juice. teaspoonful of salt. teaspoonful of pepper. ...
-How To Make White Sauce
1 tablespoonful of butter. 1 tablespoonful of flour. 1 cupful of milk. teaspoonful of salt. teaspoonful of pepper. Put one tablespoonful of butter in a saucepan. When it bubbles add one t...
-How To Make Villeroi Or Hollandaise
Villeroi (To Use For Eggs Villeroi, And For Coating Cold Meats That Are To Be Heated Again) Put in a saucepan one tablespoonful of butter and a slice of onion; fry for a few moments, but not bro...
-How To Make Chaudfroid Sauce
(For Covering Cold Chicken Or Meats Which Are To Be Served Cold) Put two tablespoonfuls of butter into a saucepan; when it bubbles add two tablespoonfuls of flour. Let it cook well, but not brown; ...
-How To Make Fruit Sauce
Jelly Sauce (Game And Mutton) Melt in a saucepan one tumblerful of currant or of grape jelly; add slowly one tablespoonful of butter. Let boil one minute; remove, and just before serving add one...
-How To Make Mayonnaise
Yolk of 1 egg. teaspoonful of salt. Dash of cayenne. 1 cupful of salad oil. 1 teaspoonfuls of lemon-juice. Let the oil and egg be thoroughly chilled before beginning to make Mayonnaise....
-Chapter XII. Entrees. How To Make Croquettes. General Directions
Entrees are the dishes served between any of the regular courses. Shape. How To Serve Croquettes are simply minced meat mixed with a thick sauce, then rolled into shape and fried. An...
-Materials Used For Croquettes
Chicken Croquettes Chop the chicken very fine, using the white meat alone, or the dark meat alone, or both together. Season with salt, pepper, onion-juice, and lemon-juice. Chopped mushrooms, sweet...
-Timbales. General Directions
Timbales are forms of pastry or of forcemeat filled with salpicon. They are made in individual, border, or cylinder molds. The receipts below give the rules for making the pastry, forcemeat, and salpi...
-How To Mold And Cook Timbales
Rub the mold well with butter; ornament it with truffle, tongue, ham, or hard-boiled egg. Cut the truffle, or other article used for the decoration, in very thin slices and stamp it into fancy shapes ...
-How To Mold And Cook Timbales. Part 2
Pain De Volaille Make a chicken cream forcemeat (see page 297). Butter individual timbale molds, decorate them with truffles, fill with forcemeat, and poach ten to fifteen minutes in slow oven. Ser...
-How To Mold And Cook Timbales. Part 3
Boudins Rouennais Line well-buttered individual molds with a cream forcemeat made of veal or chicken; fill the center with a forcemeat made of duck or any game. Cover the top with a white forcemeat...
-How To Mold And Cook Timbales. Part 4
Pastry Timbale Make a paste, using to one pound of flour three quarters of a pound of butter, four yolks, one half teaspoonful of salt, and one and a half cups of water. Work it well, roll it one q...
-How To Prepare Sweetbreads
Soak the sweetbreads in cold water for an hour or more. Change the water several times, so that all the blood will be extracted, and leave the sweetbreads very white. Put them on the fire in cold wate...
-How To Prepare Calf's Brains
Soak the brains for an hour in cold water; then simmer in water containing a tablespoonful of vinegar for twenty minutes; an Onion, thyme, bay-leaf, salt and peppercorns in the water also will improve...
-Liver Loaf, Or False Pate De Foie Gras
Cut a calf's liver in pieces; pound it in a mortar and press it through a sieve; add to one cupful of liver pulp one quarter cupful of flour panada, one teaspoonful each of butter and salt; one half t...
-How To Prepare Terrapin, Frogs' Legs
Terrapin Counts Terrapin measuring six inches or more across the bottom shell are called counts. The largest do not exceed ten inches; the average size is seven inches, and weight three to fiv...
-How To Prepare Mushrooms
(SEE ALSO PAGE 45) When one has learned to distinguish a few varieties of the edible fungi, a delicious acquisition to the menu will be enjoyed. The author will not assume the responsibility of ...
-How To Cook Mushrooms
The simplest way of cooking mushrooms is usually the best, and this may be broiling, sauteing in butter, or stewing in a little cream sauce. These simple ways may be varied by seasoning with sherry, M...
-How To Cook Mushrooms. Continued
The Agaricus Campestris This mushroom is one and two third inches in diameter; has a white or cream colored cap and purplish pink gills, the gills becoming brown at a later stage. When once learned...
-How To Dry Mushrooms
Place them in a saucepan, and cook with gentle heat until the moisture they give is evaporated; then place them on a hot shelf until they are thoroughly dry. Pound them to powder in a mortar, and plac...
-Chapter XIII. Aspic Jelly, Fancy Molding, Supports
Uses Aspic is very useful in the preparation of cold dishes, and much care should be given to having it perfectly clear and well flavored. The second one of the two receipts given below is so simpl...
-Aspic Jelly, Fancy Molding, Supports. Part 2
Chicken Aspic Or Jelly Boil a fowl as directed for chicken stock (page 100), or boil a chicken or knuckle of veal, as directed for white stock (page 99). Let the stock cool, take off the grease, th...
-Aspic Jelly, Fancy Molding, Supports. Part 3
How To Ornament Molds Lay whatever fancy pieces are used for the decoration carefully in place on the bottom of the mold. With a spoon add only enough jelly to moisten them; if too much is used, th...
-Decorations For Meat Jelly
Daisy Design Cut a hard-boiled egg into slices one eighth of an inch thick. With a pastry-bag tube or a small round vegetable-cutter stamp circles from the yolk. Cut the white strips diagonally, so...
-Decorations For Meat Jelly. Continued
Rice Socle Or Casserole Boil rice with three times its quantity of water, and a little butter, until it is very soft; then mash or pound it in a mortar until it becomes a smooth, elastic paste. Pre...
-Chapter XIV. Chafing-Dish Receipts
Chafing-Dish Cooking The chafing-dish, although a time-honored utensil, has recently had a renaissance. To-day it is not more valued for the convenience than for the fun of it. Amateurs and epicure...
-Chafing-Dish Receipts. Part 2
Panned Oysters For twenty-five oysters, put in a chafing-dish one tablespoonful of butter. When it is melted, add the juice of half a lemon and one teaspoonful of chopped parsley. Then add the oyst...
-Chafing-Dish Receipts. Part 3
Creamed Dishes (Eggs, Chicken, Or Veal) Use the double pan with water. Make a white sauce by putting in the chafing-dish one tablespoonful of butter; let it bubble, then stir in one tablespoonfu...
-How To Cook Meats
Venison Put a tablespoonful of butter in a chafing-dish. When it is very hot, lay in a piece of venison steak; let it cook a minute on both sides. Use spoons for turning the meat, so as not to pier...
-Chapter XV. Bread
The Yeast Plant Yeast is a minute plant, and like other plants must have the right conditions of heat, moisture, and nourishment in order to live or to flourish. It will be killed if scalded, or if...
-How To Make Yeast
In cities, where fresh compressed yeast can be obtained, it is not worth while to prepare one's own. Where this cannot be had, the dry yeast-cakes often give satisfactory results, but are not as relia...
-General Directions For Making Bread
Time Required For Making Bread Bread is often mixed the night before it is to be baked, and left to rise from eight to ten hours; but the whole process of bread-making, from the mixing to the servi...
-How To Make Bread
Water Bread No. 1 (Two Small Loaves) 2 cupfuls of tepid water. 1 teaspoonful of salt. compressed yeast cake. 6 to 7 cupfuls of flour. For mixing, kneading, and baking, see general direct...
-Bread Made With Baking-Powder
Add to four quarts of flour a teaspoonful of salt and six teaspoonfuls of baking-powder. Sift them three times so as to thoroughly mix them, and then add slowly a quart of cold water, or enough to mak...
-How To Make Toast
Cut the bread in even slices one quarter of an inch thick. Cut off the crust and trim the pieces into even and uniform shape. There is no waste in this, as the scraps of bread can be dried and crumbed...
-PHow To Make ulled Bread
Break off irregular pieces of the crumb of fresh bread, and dry it in a very slow oven until lightly colored. The inside of fresh biscuits left over can be treated in this way, and will keep an indefi...
-How To Make Bread Rolls
For one panful of biscuits take as much raised bread-dough as will make one loaf of bread. Use any kind of bread-dough, but if no shortening has been used, add a tablespoonful of butter to this amount...
-How To Make Biscuits
Tea Biscuits Made With Baking Powder 4 cupfuls of sifted flour. 3 teaspoonfuls of baking-powder. 1 teaspoonful of salt. 1 tablespoonful of butter. Add the salt and baking-powder to the flo...
-How To Make Corn Bread
2 cupfuls of flour. 1 cupfuls of cornmeal (yellow or white). cupful of sugar. 1 saltspoonful of salt. 3 teaspoonfuls of baking powder. 1 2/3 cupfuls of milk. 1 tablespoonful of butter or l...
-How To Make Gems
Graham Gems 2 cupfuls of Graham flour. 1 cupful of milk. 1 cupful of water. 2 eggs. teaspoonful of salt. 1 tablespoonful of sugar. Mix the dry ingredients together; beat the eggs sepa...
-How To MakebMuffins
Muffins No. 1 2 cupfuls of flour. 1 cupful of milk. 1 level tablespoonful of butter. 2 eggs (beaten separately). teaspoonful of salt. 2 even teaspoonfuls of baking-powder. Mix thoroug...
-How To Make Rusks
1 cupful of milk scalded. 2 tablespoonfuls of butter. 3 tablespoonfuls of sugar. 2 eggs. cake of compressed yeast. teaspoonful of salt. Flour. Make a sponge (see directions at...
-How To Make Coffee Cake
Take two cupfuls of bread sponge, add one egg well beaten, a half cupful of sugar, a tablespoonful of butter, and a cupful o tepid water. Mix them well together, then add enough flour to make a thin d...
-How To Make Brioche
Brioche is a kind of light bun mixture much used in France. It has many uses, and is much esteemed. It will not be found difficult or troublesome to make after the first trial. The paste once made can...
-How To Make Pancakes
The batter for pancakes should be smooth, and thin enough to run freely when turned onto the griddle. In order to have all the cakes of the same size an equal quantity of batter must be used for each ...
-Chapter XVI. Sandwiches. Sandwiches And Canapes
Sandwiches are usually the chief reliance for cold lunches, and are always acceptable if well made and attractively served. Where they are to be kept some time, as in traveling, they should be wrapped...
-How To Make Sandwiches
Meat Sandwiches Anchovies, sardines, or any fresh boiled fish may be used for sandwiches. It is better pounded to a paste. Moisten sardines with a little lemon-juice. Fish Sandwiches Fres...
-How To Make Canapes
Canapes are slices of bread toasted or fried in hot fat, or dipped in butter, and browned in the oven. The slices are then covered with some seasoned mixture. They are served hot, and make a good firs...
-How To Make Canapes. Part 2
Cheese Souffle 2 tablespoonfuls of butter. 1 heaping tablespoonful of flour. cupful of milk. teaspoonful of salt. Dash of cayenne. 3 eggs. 1 cupful of grated cheese. Put into a s...
-How To Make Canapes. Part 3
Golden Buck Make Welsh rarebits as directed above, and place on each one a poached egg (see page 263). Cheese Straws Mix with one cupful of flour one half cupful of grated Parmesan cheese...
-Chapter XVII. Salads
Drying The Salad Nearly all the meats, vegetables, and fruits may be served as salads. The essential thing is to have the salad fresh and cold; and if green, to have the leaves crisp and dry. If an...
-Salads. Part 2
French Dressing This dressing is the most simple, and the best one to use with green salads for dinner. The proportions are one tablespoonful of vinegar to three of oil, one half teaspoonful of sal...
-Salads. Part 3
Cucumber Salad To Serve With Fish Peel the cucumbers, and place them in cold water to become crisp. Do not use salt in the water, as is sometimes recommended, as it wilts and makes them indigestibl...
-Salads. Part 4
Hot Slaw Place shredded cabbage in a saucepan with enough salted boiling water to cover it. Boil it until tender, but not so long as to lose shape; turn it onto a sieve and drain it well in a warm ...
-How To Make Chicken Aspic
Aspic Of Pate En Bellevue Ornament the bottom of individual timbale molds with a daisy design made of hard-boiled egg as directed, page 326; fix it with a little jelly; then add a layer of jelly on...
-How To Make Egg Salad
Cut hard-boiled eggs (see page 262) into thick slices or into quarters. Use a sharp knife so the cuts will be clean. Arrange each portion on a leaf of lettuce partly covered with Mayonnaise, and arran...
-How To Make Russian Salad
Fill the outside of a double mold with clear aspic jelly (see page 321), and the center with a macedoine of vegetables, or with celery, or with any one vegetable. Marinate the vegetables; then mix the...
-How To Make Tomato Salads
To remove the skins from tomatoes, place them in a wire-basket, and plunge them into boiling water for a minute. This is better than letting them soak in the water, which softens them if left too long...
-Chapter XVIII. Cold Desserts
Utensils Illustration No. 1, Egg-Beaters No. 1, Dover beater; Nos. 2 and 3, Wire Whips; No. 4, Daisy beater. EGG WHIPS. 1. Dover Beater. 2. Wire Spoon. 3. Wire Whip. 4. ...
-Cold Desserts. Part 2
Materials Gelatine Cooper's gelatine costs eight cents a box, holding two ounces. Unless perfectly transparent jelly, without clarifying, is required, it serves as well as the more expensive bra...
-Cold Desserts. Part 3
Flavors Vanilla has long held first place in American cooking as flavoring, but is no longer highly esteemed, and by many it is considered injurious. The essences of fruits, flowers, and nuts are p...
-Cold Desserts. Part 4
Coloring Vegetable coloring pastes, which are entirely harmless, can be obtained for twenty-five cents a bottle. The green and the red, or carmine, are the colors generally used for icings, creams ...
-Cold Desserts. Part 5
Canned Fruits Canned fruits are now very inexpensive, and many of them are fresh in taste as well as appearance. They are useful in a variety of desserts, and often suit the purpose as well as fres...
-Cold Desserts. Custards
Boiled Custard No. 1 2 cupfuls, or one pint, of milk. Yolks of 3 eggs. saltspoonful of salt. teaspoonful of vanilla. 3 tablespoonfuls of sugar. Boiled custard is the basis of many pudd...
-Cold Desserts. Custards. Continued
Baked Custard Use the same proportions as for boiled custard. Beat the eggs, sugar, and salt together to a cream; stir in the scalded milk; turn into a pudding-dish or into cups; grate a little nut...
-How To Make Corn-Starch Puddings. (No. 1). A Plain Corn-Starch Pudding
1 pint of milk. 2 heaping tablespoonfuls of corn-starch. 3 tablespoonfuls of sugar. Whites of 3 eggs. teaspoonful of vanilla. Beat the eggs to a stiff froth. Dissolve the corn-starch ...
-How To Make Bavarian Creams
General Remarks About Bavarian creams are very wholesome, light, and delicious desserts. They are easily made, and are inexpensive, as one pint of cream is sufficient to make a quart and a half of ...
-How To Make Bavarian Creams. Continued
Bice Bavarian, Or Biz A L'Imperatrice Put into a double boiler one and one half pints of milk and a few thin cuts of lemon-zest; when it boils stir in one half cupful of well-washed rice and a salt...
-How To Make Charlotte Russe
Forms Charlotte Russe is simply a cream mixture, molded, with cake on the outside. It is easily made and always liked. Charlotte pans are oval, but any plain, round mold, or a kitchen basin with si...
-How To Make Charlotte Russe. Part 2
Charlotte Russe Filling No. 3 (Fruit) Soak an ounce of gelatine in a half cupful of cold water for half an hour. Make a syrup of one cupful of sugar, a half cupful of lemon-juice, and two cupfuls o...
-How To Make Charlotte Russe. Part 3
Strawberry Charlotte Gat large firm strawberries in two lengthwise; dip them in liquid gelatine, and line a plain mold, placing the flat side against the mold. If the mold is on ice the jelly will ...
-How To Make Whipped Cream
General Directions. Temperature. Texture One half pint of double or very rich cream costs ten cents, and may be diluted one half, giving a pint of cream as called for in the receipts. Cream should ...
-Uses For Stale Cake
Fine Cones With a biscuit-cutter, cut slices of stale cake or bread into circles. Moisten them with sherry, maraschino, or merely with a little hot water. Chop some fresh or canned pineapple into s...
-How To Make Sweet Jellies
With different flavors, colors, and combinations, a great variety of attractive desserts can be made with gelatine. They are inexpensive, require no skill, and the work is accomplished in a very few m...
-How To Make Sweet Jellies. Part 2
Wine Jelly box, or 1 ounce, of gelatine. cupful of cold water. 2 cupfuls of boiling water. 1 cupful of sugar. Juice of 1 lemon. cupful of sherry, or: 3 parts sherry, 1 part brandy. S...
-How To Make Sweet Jellies. Part 3
Whipped Jelly Or Snow Pudding Make a wine or lemon jelly (page 415). Place it in a bowl on ice; when it is cold, but before it begins to harden, beat it with a Dover beater until it becomes white a...
-How To Make Pains Aux Fruits, Or Jellied Fruits
Pain De Fraises (Strawberries) Crush the berries to a pulp; sweeten to taste, and add a little flavoring, either orange and lemon juice, maraschino or Curacao. To a pint of the pulp add a half box,...
-Chapter XIX. How To Make Hot Desserts
Souffles. General Remarks The preparation of souffles is exceedingly simple, the only difficulty being in serving them soon enough, as they fall very quickly when removed from the heat. They must g...
-How To Make Hot Desserts. Continued
Chocolate Souffle 3 ounces of chocolate. 1 heaping tablespoonful of sugar.* 2 rounded tablespoonfuls of flour. cupful of milk. Yolks of 3 eggs. Whites of 4 eggs. 1 rounded tablespoonf...
-How To Make Sweet Omelets
These desserts are quickly made, are always liked, and serve well in emergencies. Orange Omelet 3 eggs. 3 tablespoonfuls of powdered sugar. 1 orange, using the grated rind and 3 tables...
-How To Make Fritters
With fritter batter a number of good desserts are made, which, if properly fried, will be entirely free from grease, and perfectly wholesome. Fritter Baiter 2 eggs. 1 tablespoonful of oil...
-Desserts Made Of Apples
Snow Apple Pudding Fill a pudding-dish half full of apple puree or sauce, well seasoned with butter, sugar, and nutmeg. Pour over it a batter made of one and a half cupfuls of flour mixed with two ...
-Desserts Made Of Apples. Continued
Apples With Rice, No. 2 Boil the rice as above; sweeten it and flavor it with a few drops of orange-flower water, almond, or other essence, and mix into it a few chopped blanched almonds. Turn it o...
-How To Make Rice Puddings
Plain Rice Pudding No. 1 In a pudding-dish holding a quart, put two heaping tablespoonfuls of well-washed rice; fill the dish with milk, and add a half teaspoonful of salt. Let it cook in the oven ...
-How To Make Cake Puddings
Cottage Pudding 1 cupful of flour. 1 heaping teaspoonful of baking-powder. 1 tablespoonful of butter. J cupful of sugar. cupful of milk. 1 saltspoonful of salt, 1 egg. Mix the baking-pow...
-How To Make Cake Puddings. Part 2
Fig Pudding cupful of chopped figs. cupful of chopped suet. 2 cupfuls of white bread-crumbs. cupful of sugar. 1 cupful of milk. cupful of flour. cupful of chopped almonds. ...
-How To Make Cake Puddings. Part 3
Cabinet Pudding No. 4 Cut slices of bread one half inch thick to fit a mold. Fill the mold with alternate layers of bread and chopped drained pineapple (fresh or canned). Pour in a custard mixture ...
-How To Make Hot Custards
Creme Parisienne This is the same as caramel custard (page 396), except that it is served hot. Butter well a flat mold or basin, ornament the bottom with a few candied cherries and angelica, pour o...
-Short Cakes
Strawberry Shortcake 4 cupfuls of sifted flour. 3 heaping teaspoonfuls of baking-powder. 1 teaspoonful of salt. 1 teaspoonful of butter. 1 teaspoonful of lard. Milk. 2 quarts of strawberri...
-How To Make Pudding Sauces
Pudding sauces are quickly made. They call for but few materials, and, like other sauces, often give the whole character to the dish. Serving the same pudding with a different sauce, makes it a differ...
-How To Make Pudding Sauces. Continued
Sabayon No. 1 4 egg-yolks. 4 tablespoonfuls of wine. 4 tablespoonfuls of powdered sugar. Beat in a small saucepan the eggs and sugar to a light cream; add the wine. When ready to serve, pl...
-Chapter XX. How To Make Pies And Puff-Paste
Seasons The American pie is perhaps the most ridiculed of all dishes. It has, however, great popularity and undoubted merits. Were the crust, especially the under one, always right, it would remove...
-How To Make Tart Pies
(Apricot, Plum, Apple, Berry) Roll the paste one eighth of an inch thick, lay it on a deep pie-dish; let it shrink all it will, and use as little pressure as possible in fitting it to the tin. Cut ...
-How To Make Tart Pies. Part 2
Orange Pie Juice and grated yellow rind of 1 orange. 2/3 cupful of milk. 3 eggs. 1 cupful of granulated sugar. 1 tablespoonful of flour. saltspoonful of salt. Beat the yolks and th...
-How To Make Tart Pies. Part 3
Cream Pie 3 eggs. 1 cupful of sugar. 1 teaspoonful of baking-powder. 1 cupful of flour. Sift the flour and baking-powder together; beat the yolks and sugar together; add the flour and l...
-How To Make Puff-Paste
It is a mistake to consider the making of puff-paste too difficult for any but an experienced cook to undertake. No one need hesitate to attempt it, and if the few simple rules are strictly observed t...
-How To Make Puff-Paste. Continued
Pate Shells Roll puff-paste which has had six turns to a quarter-inch thickness; cut it into circles with a fluted or plain cutter two and a quarter inches in diameter. It should be icy-cold when c...
-How To Make Tart Bands
Make a good short paste, using the receipt for tart paste. Roll it one eighth inch thick, and cut it into a circle six inches in diameter, using a basin for guide. Wet the edges and lay around it a ba...
-Chapter XXI. Cake
The most difficult part of cake-making is the baking. Unless the oven is right, the cake will be a failure, no matter how carefully it may have been mixed. Rules Have everything ready before...
-Cake. Continued
How To Grease Pans. Flouring Tins Warm the pan, and with a brush spread evenly the lard or cottolene. For flat tins to be used for small cakes, brush them lightly with oil; then with a paper or clo...
-How To Make Sponge-Cakes
Sponge-Cake No. 1 6 eggs. 3 cupfuls of sugar. 4 cupfuls of flour. 1 cupful of cold water. 2 teaspoonfuls of baking-powder. Juice and grated rind of 1 lemon. teaspoonful of salt...
-How To Make Sponge-Cakes. Part 2
Sunshine Cake Make the same as angel cake, adding the beaten yolks of two eggs before putting in the flour. Genoese Cake Three eggs, and the same weight of butter, of sugar, and of flour....
-How To Make Sponge-Cakes. Part 3
Orange Filling Beat the whites of two eggs to a stiff froth. Boil one and one quarter cupfuls of sugar with one half cupful of water to the small ball (see page 512). Pour the boiling sugar in a ve...
-How To Make White Cake
Whites of 6 eggs. cupful of butter. 1 cupfuls of powdered sugar. 2 cupfuls of flour. Juice of half a lemon. teaspoonful of soda. Sift the soda with the flour three times; cream the bu...
-How To Make Brod Torte
9 eggs. 2 cupfuls of sugar. 2 cupfuls of bread-crumbs. Graham preferred. 2 teaspoonfuls of ground cinnamon. Citron size of small egg. cupful of blanched almonds. Grated rind of one lemo...
-How To Make Fruit Cake
1 pound of flour. 1 pound of sugar. 1 pound of butter. pound of candied citron (sliced) 4 pounds of currants. 4 pounds of raisins (stoned and chopped). 9 eggs. 1 tablespoonful of ground cinnam...
-How To Make Cream Cakes And Eclairs
These are made of cooked paste, and are very easy to prepare. The cream cakes differ from the eclairs only in form and in not being iced. Cream Cakes 1 cupful of water. 1 tablespoonful of...
-How To Make Fancy Small Cakes
Meringues And Kisses Add a half saltspoonful of salt to the whites of three eggs; beat them, and add gradually, while whipping, three quarters of a cupful of powdered sugar. Continue to beat until ...
-How To Make Fancy Small Cakes. Part 2
Macaroons pound of almonds. Whites of 4 eggs. 1 cupfuls of powdered sugar. Pound the blanched almonds to a paste, adding a teaspoonful of rose-water to keep them from oiling; add also the...
-How To Make Fancy Small Cakes. Part 3
Venetian Cakes cupful of butter. cupful of powdered sugar. 1 cupfuls of pastry flour. 1 cupful of almonds. 1 teaspoonful of vanilla. Yolks of 3 eggs. Cream the butter and sugar tog...
-How To Make Jumbles, Cookies, And Plain Cakes
Jumbles Beat to a cream one cupful of butter with two cupfuls of sugar. Add three eggs, the yolks and whites beaten separately; then the flavoring. Stir in lightly enough flour to make a paste just...
-How To Make Icing And Decorating Cakes
Royal Icing Place the white of an egg in a bowl or plate. Add a little lemon-juice or other flavoring, and a few drops of water. Stir in powdered sugar until it is of the right consistency to sprea...
-How To Make Garnishing Cakes
With Powdered Sugar The simplest of all garnishings is to sprinkle the cake with powdered sugar; strips of paper can be laid over the cake before it is dusted, so as to give lines or squares of whi...
-Chapter XXII. Frozen Desserts. Ice-Creams, Water-Ices, Parfaits, Mousses, Frozen Fruits, Punches, And Sherbets
Frozen desserts are the most acceptable of any that can be presented in the summer-time, and at any season they are served and expected at dinner entertainments. Comparative Trouble And Expense ...
-Receipts For Ice-Creams And Ices
Chocolate Ice-Cream Use either of the receipts given for vanilla creams, according to the richness and quality of cream desired; add to the custard while it is hot four ounces of melted chocolate. ...
-Receipts For Ice-Creams And Ices. Part 2
Nesselrode Pudding 1 cupful of French chestnuts. 1 cupful of granulated sugar. Yolks of 3 eggs. pint of cream. pound of mixed candied fruits. 1 cupful of almonds. can of pin...
-Receipts For Ice-Creams And Ices. Part 3
Sauce For Plum Pudding Glace Or For Nesselrode Pudding Beat the yolks of two eggs with two tablespoonfuls of powdered sugar to a cream. Stir it over the fire in a double boiler until the egg is a l...
-How To Make Sugar Syrup
Put two cupfuls of sugar and a half cupful of water into a saucepan on the fire. Stir until the sugar is dissolved, then let it cook slowly without touching it for about ten minutes, or until it is a ...
-How To Make Caramel Or Coffee Ice-Cream
Caramel Ice-Cream No. 1 1 pint of milk. 1 pint of cream. 3 whole eggs. 1 tablespoonfuls of scraped chocolate. Caramel. Scald the milk; add it slowly to the beaten eggs; add the chocolate, an...
-Vanilla Ice-Creams
No. 1. Philadelphia Ice-Cream 1 quart of cream. pound, or 1 cupful, of sugar, 1 vanilla bean or 1 tablespoonful of vanilla extract. If the cream is very rich dilute it with a little milk, o...
-How To Make Parfait
Vanilla Parfait Beat the yolks of eight eggs until light; add one cupful of syrup. Place the mixture on a slow fire and stir constantly until the eggs have thickened enough to make a thick coating ...
-How To Make Biscuits Glace
Make a syrup of one cupful of sugar and a quarter cupful of water. Beat the yolks of four eggs; add to them three quarters of a cupful of syrup and a half cupful of cream or milk. Place the mixture on...
-How To Make Mousses
Whip a pint of cream very stiff; turn it onto a sieve to drain for a few minutes so it will be entirely dry. Return it to the bowl and whip into it lightly four tablespoonfuls of powdered sugar and a ...
-How To Make Water-Ices
Water-ices are made of fruit-juice sweetened with sugar syrup. Sugar may be used, but the result is better with syrup. The liquid mixture should register 20 on the syrup gauge, but if one is not ...
-How To Make Punches And Sherbets
Serving These ices are served in glasses after the joint or last entree, and before the game. A quart is enough for twelve portions. Liquors Punches differ from sherbets only in having a litt...
-Chapter XXIII. Sugar And Its Uses Boiling Sugar And Making Candies
Boiling Sugar To boil sugar is one of the niceties of cooking, but as the uses of boiled sugar in fancy cooking are so various, it is worth some practice to acquire the requisite skill. With the or...
-Degrees Of Boiling Sugar
First And Second Degrees Small Thread, 215. Large Thread, 217. Press a little of the syrup between the thumb and finger. A ring will form and a fine thread be drawn out which breaks...
-How To Make Syrups
Syrup Kept In Stock To use a syrup gauge have a glass deep enough to allow the gauge to float. A small cylindrical glass like the one shown in illustration is best, as it requires so little syrup t...
-Fondant. The Uses Of Fondant
Fondant is the basis of all French cream candies. It can be kept any length of time in air-tight preserve jars, and used as needed for the various purposes which it serves. A great variety of bonbons ...
-Spun Sugar. Three Requisites
Although spinning sugar has been called the climax of the art of sugar work, one need not be deterred from trying it; for with a dry atmosphere, the sugar boiled to the right degree, and care given to...
-How To Make Candies
How To Prevent Granulation When making candies observe carefully the rules for boiling sugar. When sugar reaches the candy stage, the water has evaporated, and the tendency is to return to the orig...
-How To Make Candies. Part 2
Nougat No. 2 (For Molding) Put two cupfulls of granulated sugar into a saucepan with a half cupful of water. Let it boil to the crack (310) without stirring (see boiling sugar, page 511), add ...
-How To Make Candies. Part 3
Sugared Almonds Put a cupful of granulated sugar in a saucepan with a little water. Stir until it is dissolved, then let it cook to the ball stage without touching except to test. Turn in a half cu...
-Caeamels
Chocolate Put into a saucepan a half cupful each of molasses, of white sugar and of brown sugar, a cupful of grated chocolate, and a cupful of cream or milk. Stir the mixture constantly over the fi...
-Bonbons Of Fondant Harlequin Balls
Take several small portions of fondant and color each one a different shade Do this by dipping a wooden toothpick into the coloring matter and then touching it to the paste. The colors are strong, and...
-Candies Made From Sugar Boiled To The Crack Or The Caramel
Peppermint Drops Boil a cupful of sugar to the hard-ball. Remove it from the fire; add a half teaspoonful of essence of peppermint and stir it just enough to mix in the flavoring and cloud the suga...
-Candied Orange Or Lemon Peel
Keep the peel of the fruit, as it is used, in a weak brine until enough has collected to preserve. Wash it thoroughly in several waters. Let it boil in plenty of water until tender, changing the water...
-Chapter XXIV. Fruits
In point of general usefulness, apples hold the first place among fruits. Oranges also serve a great number of purposes, and, like apples, can be depended on nearly the whole year. Peaches and apricot...
-Fruits. Continued
Salpicon Of Fruit Punch This is served in glasses, in place of and in the same way as frozen punch after the roast. Cut a pineapple into small dice; remove the bitter skin carefully from the segmen...
-Chapter XXV. How To Make Compotes
Compotes For Plain Desserts Compotes are fresh fruits stewed. They are good served with cake as a plain dessert. In combination with rice or other molded cereals they are a very wholesome sweet ...
-Preserving
Sterilizing The Fruit. Use Of Paraffin. Proportions. Utensils The success of preserving and canning depends upon heating the fruit until all germs are destroyed, then sealing it air-tight while sti...
-Preserving. Continued
Preserved Pears Peel the pears; cut them in two lengthwise, splitting the stem, or they may be left whole if preferred. Place them carefully in jars; fill the jars with a syrup of 30 (see page...
-Canning
Apples, Peaches, Pears, Plums, Cherries, Berries, Etc Proportions Canning does not differ from preserving, except in the amount of sugar used. A quarter of a pound of sugar to a pound of fruit i...
-How To Make Jams Or Marmalades
Use three quarters of a pound of sugar to a pound of fruit. Place the fruit, pared and cored, in layers with the sugar in the preserving kettle. Let it stand a few minutes to extract some of the juice...
-How To Make Jellies
Currant Or Any Berries To make clear jelly use only the perfect fruit. Pick it over carefully and remove the stems. Place it in a porcelain-lined kettle and crush it enough to give a little juice s...
-How To Make Pickles
Spiced Grapes Prepare the grapes as for preserving, by removing the skins, boiling the pulp, and straining out the seeds. To seven pounds of fruit (weighed before the seeds are removed), add a cupf...
-Chapter XXVI. Beverages
Filtered Water It is a recognized fact that many diseases are contracted through drinking impure water, yet many are so careless as not to take the simple means of removing this danger. It only req...
-How To Make Tea
Packing You cannot have first-rate tea or coffee unless you use freshly-boiled water. Water that has been boiled for an hour or more lacks life, and gives a dull taste to the decoction. Draw freshl...
-How To Make Coffee
Care Of The Coffee-Bean It is generally understood that tea becomes air-drawn if not kept closely covered. It is also desirable to keep coffee in the same way. Coffee Mixtures And Brands. 2/...
-How To Make Chocolate Drink
Maillard's chocolate is excellent; his receipt is given below. For each cup of chocolate use one cupful of milk and one bar of chocolate. With Maillard's chocolate this is nearly one and a quarter oun...
-How To Make Lemonade
Squeeze the lemons, allowing two lemons for every three glasses of lemonade; remove any seeds that may have fallen in, or strain the juice if the lemonade is wanted clear. Sweeten the juice with sugar...
-How To Make Claret Cups
1 pint of claret. 1 pint of soda. Juice of 1 lemon. 1 sherry-glassful of liqueur. 1 slice of cucumber rind. 1 orange. Grapes. Bunch of mint. Large piece of ice. Claret Cup No. 2 ...
-How To Make Champagne Cups
Juice of lemon. 1 teaspoonful of powdered sugar. I sherry-glassful of liqueur. 1 pint of champagne. 1 pint of soda. 1 slice of cucumber. 1 slice of pineapple. 1 orange cut in pieces. ...
-How To Make Milk Shake
Fill a glass two thirds full of milk; sweeten it to taste with any fruit syrup, or with a syrup made of boiled sugar flavored with vanilla, orange-flower water, or any liqueur; strained preserve of an...
-How To Make Fruit Syrups
A refreshing drink can be made of fresh strawberries, raspberries, cherries, or currants. Cook a quart of fruit with a pint of water until well softened; then strain and press out the juice through a ...
-Koumiss
Driving The Corks Koumiss, which is simply fermented milk, can easily be made at home after the receipt given below, and can then be had sweet and is much more palatable than the acid koumiss sold ...
-Chapter XXVII. Wines
White Wines The temperance movement has made great advance since the days when it was not considered etiquette for a man to leave the table sober, and also from recent times when men lingered at th...







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