Blancmange (2)

Boil for a few minutes a pint and a half of new milk, with an ounce of picked isinglass (if in summer, one ounce and a quarter), the rind of half a lemon peeled very thin, a little cinnamon, and a blade of mace, and two and a half ounces of lump sugar: blanch and pound eight or ten bitter, and half an ounce of sweet almonds very fine, with a spoonful of rose water, and mix them with the milk; strain it through aslawn sieve or napkin into a basin, with half a pint of good cream. Let it stand half an hour; pour it into another basin, leaving the sediment at the bottom, and when nearly cold fill it into moulds; when wanted, put your finger round the mould; pull out the blancmange; set it in the centre of a dish, and garnish with slices of orange. N. B. - About half a gill of noyeau may be substituted for the almonds.

Blancmange (3)

Boil till dissolved, in a large tea-cupful of water, three-quarters of an ounce of isinglass; when milk-warm, add it to a quart of rich cream, with a stick of cinnamon, the peel of a lemon, two or three laurel leaves, or a few bitter almonds; sweeten with pounded loaf sugar; stir it over the fire, and let it boil for two or three minutes; strain it through a bit of muslin into a deep dish, and stir it till nearly cold, then pour it into an earthen-ware mould or shape; the following day, dip the mould into warm water for a minute or so, clap it with the hand to loosen the edge, place the glass or china dish over the mould, and turn it out quickly upon the dish. As much cowheel stock as will half fill the shape may be substituted for the isinglass.

Blancmange (4)

Blanch and pound with a little ratafia, or rose-water, two ounces of sweet, and six bitter almonds; dissolve three-quarters of an ounce of isinglass; add it, when milk-warm, to a quart of good cream; half milk half cream may be used; mix in the almonds the peel of a small lemon, and a bit of cinnamon; sweeten it with pounded loaf sugar, let it stand for two or three hours, put it into a saucepan, stir it constantly, and let it boil for six or eight minutes; strain it through a lawn sieve, and stir it till nearly cold, then pour it into a mould.

Blancmange (5)

Blanch and pound one ounce of sweet almonds with a glass of sherry, and a table-spoonful of pounded loaf sugar; add it to three-quarters of an ounce of isinglass dissolved in half a pint of water, and boil it till the flavor of the almonds bo extracted, stirring it all the time; strain it through a bit of thin muslin, and mix with it a quart of good cream; stir it till quite cold, and pour it into a shape.

American Blancmange

Mix half a pint of cold water with two ounces of arrowroot, let it settle for fifteen minutes, pour off the water, and add a table-spoonful of laurel water, and a little sugar; sweeten a quart of new milk, boil it with a little cinnamon, and half the peel of a lemon; pick out the cinnamon and lemon, and pour the boiling milk upon the arrow-root, stirring it all the time. Put it into a mould, and turn it out the following day.