Hand Of Pork

Cut thin slices from this delicate joint, either across near the knuckle, or from the blade bone, as directed for a shoulder of mutton. This forms a nice dish for a tete-a-tete dinner; there is not sufficient for a third person.

Roast Pig

Roast Pig

As this is usually divided as above, before sent to table, little remains to be done by the carver. First separate a shoulder from the body, and then the leg; divide the ribs into convenient portions, and send round with a sufficiency of the stuffing and gravy. Many prefer the neck end between the shoulders, although the ribs are considered the finest part; but as this all depends on taste, the question should be put. The ear is reckoned a delicacy.

Should the head not be divided, it must be done, and the brains taken out, and mixed with the gravy and stuffing.

A Loin Of Pork

A Loin Of Pork is cut up in the same manner as a loin of Mutton. See page xli.

Leg Of Pork

Leg Of Pork

Commence carving about midway, between the knuckle and farther end, and cut thin deep slices from either side of the line 1. For the seasoning in a roast leg, lift it up, and it will be found under the skin at the large end.

Ham

Ham

The usual mode of carving this joint, is by long delicate slices, through the thick fat, in the direction 1-2, laying open the bone at each cut, which brings you to the prime part at once. A more saving way is to commence at the knuckle and proceed onwards.

Some persons take out a round piece at 3, and enlarge the hole, by cutting thin, circular slices with a sharp knife. This keeps the meat moist, and preserves the gravy, but seldom looks handsome.