The carving-knife for poultry is smaller and lighter than the meat carver; the point is more peaked and the handle longer.

In cutting up a Turkey, Goose, Duck, or Wild Fowl, more prime pieces may be obtained by carving slices from pinion to pinion, without making wings; this is an advantage when your party is large, as it makes the bird go farther.

A Fowl

A Fowl

It will be more convenient in carving this to take it on your plate, and lay the joints, as divided, neatly on the dish. Fix your fork in the middle of the breast, and take the wing off in the direction of 1-2; divide the joint at 1, lift up the pinion with your fork, and draw the wing towards the leg, which will separate the fleshy part more naturally than by the knife; cut between the leg and body at 3 to the bone, 2, give the blade a sudden turn, and the joint will break if the fowl is not old. When a similar operation is performed on the other side, take off the merrythought, by cutting in to the bone at 4, and turning it back, which will detach it; next remove the neck bones and divide the breast from the back, by cutting through the whole of the ribs, close to the breast. Turn up the back, press the point of the knife about half way between the neck and rump, and on raising the lower end it will separate easily. Turn the rump from you, take off the sidesmen, and the operation is complete.

The breast and wings are the must delicate parts, but the leg is more juicy in a young bird. Great care should be taken to cut the wings as handsome as possible.

A Turkey

The finest parts of this bird are the breast and wings; the latter will bear some delicate slices being taken off. After the fore quarters are severed, the thighs must be divided from the drumsticks, which, being tough, should be reserved till last. In other respects, a turkey must be dealt with exactly as recommended for a fowl, except that it has no merrythought.

Give a portion of the stuffing or forced-meat, which is inside the breast, to each person.

A Partridge

A Partridge is cut up in the same manner as a fowl, only, on account of the smallness of the bird, the merrythought is seldom divided from the breast. The wings, breast, and merrythought, are the finest parts of it, but the wing is considered the best, and the tip of it is reckoned the most delicious morsel of the whole.

A Pheasant

A Pheasant

Fix your fork in the centre of the breast, and make incisions to the bone at 1-2, then take off the leg in the line 3-4, and the wing at 3-5; serve the other side in the same manner, and separate the slices you had previously divided on the breast. In taking off the wings, be careful not to venture too near the neck, or you will hit on the neck bone, from which the, wing should be divided. Pass the knife through the line 6, and under the merrythought towards the neck, which will detach it. The other parts may be served as directed for a fowl.

The breast, wings, and merrythought, are the most delicate parts, although the leg has a higher flavor.

Woodcocks, Grouse, Etc

Are carved similar to a fowl, if not too small, when they may be cut in quarters and helped. Snipes, being smaller, should be divided in halves.

Pigeons

Pigeons

The usual way of carving these birds is to insert the knife at 1, and cut to 2 and 3, when each portion may be divided into two pieces and helped; sometimes they are cut in halves, either across or down the middle, but as the lower part is thought the best, the first mode is the fairest.

Should they be very large and fine, they may be served like fowls.

A Goose

A Goose

Take off the wing by putting the fork into the small end of the pinion and press it close to the body; divide the joint at 1 with the knife, carrying it along as far as 2. Remove the leg by cutting in the direction of 2-3, and divide the thigh from the drumstick; then sever the limbs on the other side, and cut some long slices from each side of the breast, between the lines a and b.

To get at the stuffing, the apron must be removed, by cutting from 4 to 5 by 3, It is rarely necessary to cut up the whole of the goose, unless the company is large, but the merrythought may be taken off: there are two side bones by the wing, which may be cut off, as likewise the back, and lower sidebones. The best pieces are the breast and thighs.

A Duck

Remove the legs and wings as directed above for a goose, and cut some slices from each side of the breast. The seasoning will be found under the flap, as in the other bird. Should it be necessary, the merrythought, sidebones, etc, can be detached in the same manner as recommended for a fowl.

Haunch Of Venison

Haunch Of Venison

First let out the gravy by cutting in to the bone across the joint at 1-2, then turn the broad end towards you, make as deep an incision as you can from 3 to 4, and help thin slices from each side. The greater part of the fat, which is much esteemed, will be found on the left side, and those who carve must take care to proportion both it and the gravy to the number of the company.

Hare