Lamb And Turnips

Three pounds of the breast of fat lamb is enough to cook with one quarter of a peck of turnips. Peel the turnips and chip them up in thin pieces as you do apples for pies. Wash them in cold water and put them into a colander. Mix one tablespoon-ful of fresh butter with one teaspoonful of flour and put it into a stew pan and let it boil a minute, then put in a pint of boiling water and the turnips with one teaspoonful of salt. The water must cover the turnips and they must cook slowly three hours. Wash the lamb, dry it off and sprinkle it with salt and pepper. When the turnips have cooked one hour put in the lamb, skin side down, and cook them together two hours longer. If the lamb is very fat omit the butter. There must be very little water in the stew pan when the lamb and turnips are done.

Larded Leg Of Lamb

Wash the lamb in cold water and dry it off with a linen cloth, then lard it with small pickled button onions. Make the incisions deep with a sharp pointed knife and put the onions in out of sight. Salt and pepper it and dredge it with flour. Put one tablespoonful of fresh butter and one of fresh lard into a dutch oven, and when it is hot enough to brown lay in the lamb and brown it on both sides. Put in a tablespoonful of hot water from time to time and baste often. Cover the oven to keep in the steam and cook it; slowly one hour. When lifted put into the gravy one teaspoonful of browned flour and one gill of hot water. Let it boil five minutes, stirring it up well from the bottom, then put in three tablespoonfuls of my tomato catsup and lift.

Roasted Leg Of Lamb

Take a leg of young lamb that weighs three and a half pounds, wash it in cold water, dry it, salt and pepper it with a teaspoonful of salt and scant half a teaspoonful of pepper. Dredge it well on both sides with flour; put one tablespoonful of fresh butter and one of lard into a dutch oven and when it is hot enough to brown lay in the leg of lamb; brown it on both sides and baste often; put in a tablespoonful of hot water before basting, and keep the oven covered. Cook it slowly for one hour; after it is lifted put in one gill of hot water; let it boil a miuute, stir the gravy up well from the bottom and lift. Serve with young turnips, green peas and new potatoes.

Fried Lamb Chops

Wash the lamb chops in cold water and dry them off, then salt and pepper them and dredge them with flour; have ready on the fire a skillet with one tablespoonful of butter and one of lard, and when it is hot enough to brown lay in the chops; cook them ten minutes, then turn them and cook them ten minutes longer, then lift into a warm chafing-dish, pour one gill of hot water into the gravy, let it boil a few minutes, stirring it up well from the bottom, then put in three tablespoonfuls of my tomato catsup and lift.

Boiled A Leg Of Southdown Mutton

Cut the knuckle from the leg, then wash the mutton in cold water and put it into a kettle with cold water enough to cover it that has one table-spoonful of salt in it; just before the water begins to boil skim it well; cover the kettle and let it boil slowly one hour and a half if young, if old, two hours. If the water boils down too low replenish with boiling water. Serve with caper, mint or tomato sauce.

Southdown Mutton Chops, Broiled By Gas

After the chops have been washed in cold water and dried off pound them with the beefsteak pounder, then salt and pepper them; rub the grid-iron with a piece of fat pork or some lard tied in cloth and lay the chops on it; place the gridiron over the pan that is to catch the gravy and set it into the broiler, then let the gas on and in ten minutes turn the chops and broil them ten minutes longer.