It is so much easier to measure ingredients than to weigh them that the housewife saves time and work by acquainting herself with certain equivalent measures and weights. Without burdening her memory with a dry array of items and figures, I have collected here certain details to which she can refer quickly and confidently.

"One cupful" of flour, milk, etc., means half a pint.

Two scant cupfuls of packed butter make one pound.

Two and a half even cupfuls of powdered sugar are one pound.

Two cupfuls (one pint) of water or milk make one pound.

Three even cupfuls of Indian meal make one pound.

Four even cupfuls of dry flour make one pound.

Two cupfuls (one pint) of water or milk make one pound.

Ten eggs of ordinary size make one pound.

Two cupfuls of minced beef, packed closely, make one pound.

A gill of liquid is half a cupful.

One heaping tablespoonful of granulated sugar is one ounce.

Two heaping tablespoonfuls of flour make one ounce.

Two heaping tablespoonfuls of powdered sugar make one ounce.

Two heaping tablespoonfuls of ground coffee make one ounce.

One tablespoonful of milk, vinegar or brandy make one-half ounce.

The juice of an ordinary lemon is about a tablespoonful. A breakfast cupful of bread-crumbs well pressed in equals about four ounces. Very finely chopped suet, slightly heaped up, weighs about the same. A heaped breakfast cupful of brown sugar represents half a pound, and stoned raisins well pressed in weigh about the same.