TO PRESERVE. TO COLOR. BOILED. SCRAMBLED.

FRIED. POACHED. STEAMED. BAKED.

PANNED. SCALLOPED. CURRIED. CHOWDER.

STUFFED. PICKLED. OMELET.

EGGS are regarded by some as a great delicacy; by others, as a prime article of food. But in either case, the mode of cooking has much to do with the satisfaction produced in the eating. The yolk is considered much more nutritious than the white.

To ascertain the freshness of an egg, hold it in the hand and look through it to the light. If it looks clear, there is tolerable assurance that it is good. Another test is to put them in a clear vessel of water. The good ones will lie on the side.

The eggs of the common hen are esteemed the best. They are much better when new-laid, than even a day or two afterwards.

Turkey eggs are almost equal to those of the hen - not quite so mild.

Goose eggs are large, and agreeable to the taste.

Duck eggs are richly-flavored. The white is of a bluish tint, and will cook in less time than that of the hen.

Guinea-hen s eggs are smaller and more delicate than those of the common hen.

Eggs of wild fowl are usually colored, and often spotted. They frequently taste somewhat like the birds themselves.

Eggs of land birds, such as the plover, are much liked, but those of sea-fowl have a fishy taste that is disagreeable.

Turtle eggs are numerous, and have yolk only. The eggs of some varieties have no shell. They are very delicious. The turtle lays from 150 to 200 at a time, and lays several times during the year.