Water Bread

Water bread is made precisely the same as Milk Bread, using tepid water instead of milk.

Milk Bread With Potato Sponge

2 potatoes

1 tablespoonful of salt

About four quarts of flour

1 quart of milk 1 cup of yeast or half a compressed cake

Pare the potatoes, put them in a saucepan with a quart of boiling water, and boil until very tender. Put one cup of flour in the bread pan, pour over it one cup of the boiling potato water, beat quickly; mash the potatoes through a colander into this batter, and beat again until smooth. When lukewarm, add the yeast and salt; mix, cover, and stand in a warm place (72o Fahr.) over night. In the morning scald the milk; and, when lukewarm, add to it sufficient flour to make a batter; then add the potato sponge, mix well, cover, and stand away in a warm place until very light. Then add sufficient flour to make a dough. Take it out on a baking-board as soon as it is stiff enough to do so, and knead quickly and gently until the dough is perfectly smooth and elastic, and will not stick to the board or hands; then cut it into quarters, mould into loaves, place each loaf in a greased bread pan, cover with a towel, and stand in a warm place to rise, until it doubles its bulk. Then bake in a moderately quick oven (3900 Fahr.) for three-quarters of an hour.

Stirred Bread

Make a sponge the same as for Milk Bread, and let it stand over night. In the morning, beat it well, add one cup of flour, and pour it into greased, deep bread pans. Let it stand until light (about two hours). Bake in a moderately quick oven for three-quarters of an hour.

This makes a very sweet bread, but is not so delicate as when kneaded.

Salt-Rising Bread

Add to one pint of scalding water sufficient flour to make a thick batter, add a half-teaspoonful of salt, and beat until smooth and full of air-bubbles. Cover closely, stand in a pan of warm water and keep in a warm place over night. In the morning, scald one pint of milk, stand aside until lukewarm; add a teaspoonful of salt and enough flour to make a batter that will drop, not pour, from a spoon. Now turn into this the salt rising, which should be very-light, and emit a very unpleasant odor; beat thoroughly and continuously for three minutes, then cover with a towel, stand in a pan of warm water, and put where it will keep warm until very light (about two hours); then add sufficient flour to make a dough; knead thoroughly and continuously until smooth and elastic, divide into loaves, mould, place in greased pans, cover with a towel, and, when very light, bake in a moderate oven (3000 Fahr.) one hour.

This must be kept very much warmer than a yeast bread, or it will not rise. It is thought by some more digestible than any other kind of bread.

Sweet Potato Bread

1 quart of flour

4 roasted sweet potatoes

1 tablespoonful of salt

1 pint of warm water 1 cup of yeast or half a compressed cake

1 tablespoonful of butter

Put the water into a bread pan or large bowl, add the butter, salt, yeast and flour; beat well, and stand in a warm place over night. In the morning, bake the potatoes and press them through a sieve into the light sponge, add flour, and finish same as Milk Bread.