I have made calf's-foot jelly twice, and never intend to make it again. I would not have made it the second time, except for the purpose of succeeding, and getting a reliable receipt for this book. At the first attempt, I happened to have company who had heard that I pretended to be a cook. The jelly was opaque, tasteless, and split in two. Here is a successful receipt. It requires almost every thing known in the cooking calender; but do not attempt it with less, and after a trial use gelatine only for jellies.

Ingredients: Four calf's feet boiled in a gallon of water, seven eggs, one and a half pounds of sugar, one pint of sherry wine, a stick of cinnamon, three cloves, and half a box of gelatine.

Split the calf's feet, break the bones, and place them on the fire at the back of the range, with a gallon of cold water, to boil gently for five hours. Skim the water often, which should be reduced to rather less than two quarts; then strain the jelly into a pan, and, when perfectly firm, remove the fat and sediment.

Add to the jelly the beaten whites and crushed shells of seven eggs, one and a half pounds of sugar, a pint of sherry wine, a stick of cinnamon, three cloves, and half a box of gelatine soaked in a little water, and whip this well together; set it over the fire, and when it has just begun to boil throw in the juice of six lemons, and one or two table-spoonfuls of clear, cold water; take the kettle off the fire, let it remain at the side in rather a hot place about ten minutes, then skim off carefully all the scum from the top. Put into the jelly-bag the thin cuts from the peels of four lemons, not cutting the white or under skin, as that is bitter; then pour in the jelly, having the apparatus near the fire to prevent the jelly hardening before it has all passed through.