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Practical Cooking And Dinner Giving | by Mary F. Henderson



The aim of this book is to indicate how to serve dishes, and to entertain company at breakfast, lunch, and dinner, as well as to give cooking receipts. Too many receipts are avoided, although quite enough are furnished for any practical cook-book. There are generally only two or three really good modes of cooking a material, and one becomes bewildered and discouraged in trying to select and practice from books which contain often from a thousand to three thousand receipts.

TitlePractical Cooking And Dinner Giving
AuthorMary F. Henderson
PublisherHarper & Brothers, Publishers
Year1888
Copyright1876, Harper & Brothers
AmazonPractical Cooking And Dinner Giving
-Practical Cooking And Dinner Giving
A Treatise Containing Practical Instructions In Cooking; In The Combination And Serving Of Dishes; And In The Fashionable Modes Of Entertaining At Breakfast, Lunch, And Dinner. By Mrs. Mary F. Hend...
-Preface
The aim of this book is to indicate how to serve dishes, and to entertain company at breakfast, lunch, and dinner, as well as to give cooking receipts. Too many receipts are avoided, although quite en...
-Setting The Table And Serving The Dinner
An animated controversy for a long time existed as to the best mode of serving a dinner. Two distinct and clearly de-fined styles, known as the English and Russian, each having its advantages and disa...
-Setting The Table And Serving The Dinner. Part 2
The warm dishes - not hot dishes - keep in a tin closet or on the top shelf of the range until the moment of serving. A plate of bread should also be on the sideboard. Place the soup-tureen (with s...
-Setting The Table And Serving The Dinner. Part 3
Then, again, witbout paying a high price, one can not secure a waiter who is a good carver. I am almost inclined to say one must possess the luxury of a French waiter for carving at the side-table. En...
-Setting The Table And Serving The Dinner. Continued
Bills of fare are generally written in French. It is a pity that our own rich language is inadequate to the duties of a fashionable bill of fare, especially when, perhaps, all the guests do not unders...
-The Dinner Party
It is very essential, in giving a dinner party, to know precise-ly how many guests one is to entertain. It is a serious inconv-venience to have any doubt on this subject. Consequently, it is well to s...
-Cooking As An Accomplishment
The reason why cooking in America is, as a rule, so inferior is not because American women are less able and apt than the women of France, and not because the American men do not discuss and appreciat...
-Breakfast
After a fast of twelve or thirteen hours, the System requires something substantial as preparation for the labors of the day; consequently, I consider the American breakfasts more desirable for an act...
-Let Us Now Set The American Breakfast-Table
The coffee-urn and silver service necessary are placed in a straight line before the hostess. The one or two kinds of sub-stantials are set before the host; vegetables or entrées are placed on the sid...
-Lunch
This is more espccially a ladies' meal. If one gives a lunch party, ladies alone are generally invited. It is an informal meal on ordinary occasions, when every thing is placed upon the ta ble at once...
-Gentlemen's Suppers
As ladies hâve exclusive lunches, gentlemen hâve exclusive suppers. Nearly the same dishes are served for suppers as for lunches, although gentlemen generally prefer more game and wine. Sometimes they...
-Evening Parties
If people can afford to give large evening parties, it is less trouble and more satisfactory to place the supper in the hands of the confectioner. For card parties or small companies of thirty or f...
-Something About Economy
I am indebted to a French girl living in our family for the substance of tins chapter. lier parents being obliged to live in a most economical way in St. Louis, still had an uncommonly good table. One...
-Directions And Explanations
Seeds For Soups If the fresh or dried vegetables are not at hand, seeds, such as celery, carrot-seed, etc., can be substituted for a flavoring. How To Chop Suet Sprinkle flour over it while c...
-Boiling
Fowls or joints should be tied or well skewered into shape before boiling. Every thing should be gently simmered, rather than fast boiled, in order to be tender. The water sbould never be al-lowed ...
-Frying
Frying means cooking by immersion in hot fat, butter, or oil. There is no English word for what is called frying in a spoonful of fat, first on one side, and then on the other. Sauté is the French wor...
-How To Prepare Grease For Frying (Professor Blot)
Take beef suet, the part around the kidneys, or any kind of fat, raw or cooked, and free of fibres, nerves, thin skin, or bones; chop it fine; add to it whatever you may have of fat skimmed off the to...
-Broiling
I did not appreciate the nicety of broiling until, upon an occasion, a gentleman invited a dinner company to a private dining-room of one of our large restaurants, to eat a certain kind of fish, which...
-Roasting
There is little use to talk about roasting, as but few will attempt it, always considering it easier to bake instead. Indeed, there is so little demand in many sections for stoves and ranges suited to...
-Braising
A braising - kettle has a deep cover, which holds coals; consequently, the cooking is done from above as well as below. It is almost air-tight, thus preventing evaporation, and the article to be cooke...
-Larding
Cut the firmest bacon fat, with a heated or very sharp knife, into square lengths of equal size. Placing one end in a larding-needle, draw it through the skin and a small bit of the meat, leaving the ...
-Boning
Boning is not a difficult operation. It only requires time, a thin, sharp knife, and a little care. Cut off the neck, and also the legs at the first joint. Cut the skin in a line down the middle of th...
-Egg And Bread Crumbing
Always sift the bread or cracker crumbs. Whenever there are spare pieces or trimmings of bread or broken crackers, dry them at once in the oven, and after pounding and sifting, put them away in a tin ...
-How To Cook Puddings In Boiling Water
Wet and flour the cloth before adding the pudding. In tying in the pudding, leave room enough for it to swell. If cooked in a mold, do not fill the mold quite full. Never let the water stop boiling. A...
-How To Flavor With Lemon Zest
Never use the white part of the peel of a lemon for flavoring. It is bitter. The little globules of oil in the surface of the rind contain all the pleasant flavor of the peel. It may be thinly pared o...
-The Cook's Table Of Weights And Measures
1 quart of sifted flour = 1 pound. 1 quart of powdered sugar = 1 pound and 7 ounces. 1 quart of granulated sugar = 1 pound and 9 ounces. 1 pint of closely packed butter = 1 pound. Butter, ...
-Cooking Utensils
The Bain Marie This is an open vessel, to be kept at the back of the range or in some warm place, to be filled with hot (not boiling) water. Several stew-pans, or large tin cups with covers and han...
-Cooking Utensils. Part 2
The Saratoga Potato-Cutter The screws at the sides adjust a sharp knife, so that, by rubbing the potato over the plane, it may be cut as fine or as coarse as may be desired. The plane is also used ...
-Cooking Utensils. Part 3
French Vegetable-Cutters The little cups of figures A and B are pressed into potatoes, or any bulbous vegetable, then turned around. The cutter A will make little potato-balls, say an inch in diame...
-Cooking Utensils. Part 4
A Knife For Peeling The wire prevents the cutting of more than the skins of fruits or vegetables. The wire may be attached or detached at will, for cleaning it. Wire Skewers (Fig. A) They are...
-Cooking Utensils. Part 5
Apple-Corer The larger tube is for coring apples; the smaller one for coring Siberian crab-apples, for preserving. Jelly-Stand This is simply and cheaply made. Rings can be fastened to the en...
-Molds
Fig. A, a circular tin mold for blanc-manges, jellies, etc. Fig. B, supposed to be a blanc-mange filled with strawberries. These centres may be filled with any kind of berries, compotes, fresh fruits,...
-Little Silver-Plated Chafing Disk
It is about four and a half inches square, for serving Welsh rare-bits, or for small pieces of venison - steak, with currant jelly. One is served to each person at table. The lower part is a reservoir...
-A Meringue Decorator
The little tin tube A (one-third of an inch in diameter), or B, is put in the bottom of the bag. Meringue (whipped whites of eggs, sweetened and flavored), or frosting for cakes, is put in the bag, an...
-Bread, And Breakfast Cakes
It requires experience to make good bread. One must know, first, how long to let the bread rise, as it takes a longer time in cold than in warm weather; second, when the oven is just of proper tempera...
-How To Make Yeast
Ingredients: A cupful of baker's yeast; four cupfuls of flour; two large potatoes, boiled; one cupful of sugar, and six cupfuls of boiling water. Mix the warm mashed potatoes and sugar together; th...
-How To Make The Bread
Ingredients: Flour, one and a half cupfuls of yeast, lukewarm water, a table-spoonful of lard, a little salt. Put two quarts of flour into the bread-bowl; sprinkle a little salt over it; add one an...
-Mrs. Bonner's Bread
This is a delicious bread, which saves the trouble of making yeast. Twenty-five cents' worth of Twin Brothers' yeast will last a small family six weeks. I would recommend Mrs. Bonner's bread in prefer...
-French Bread (Grace Melaine Lourant)
Put a heaping table-spoonful of hops and a quart of hot water over the fire to boil. Have ready five or six large boiled potatoes, which mash fine. Strain the hops. Now put a pint of boiling water (th...
-Toast
I have remarked before that not one person in a thousand knows how to make good toast. The simplest dishes seem to be the ones oftenest spoiled. If the cook sends to the table a properly made piece of...
-Parker House Rolls
Ingredients: Two quarts of flour, one pint of milk (meas-ured after boiling), butter the size of an egg, one table-spoonful of sugar, one tea-cupful of home-made yeast, and a little salt. Make a ho...
-Soda And Cream Of Tartar Biscuit
Ingredients: One quart of flour, one tea-spoonful of soda, two tea-spoonfuls cream of tartar, one even tea-spoonful of salt, lard or butter the size of a small egg, and milk. Put the soda, cream of...
-Biscuits With Baking-Powder
They are made as in the last receipt, merely substituting two heaping tea-spoonfuls of baking-powder for the cream of tartar and soda, and taking the same care to mix evenly. These biscuits are nic...
-Muffins
Ingredients: Two eggs, one pint of flour, one tea-cupful of milk or cream, butter half the size of an egg, a little salt, and one tea-spoonful of baking-powder. Mix the baking-powder and salt in th...
-Waffles
Ingredients: Two eggs, one pint of flour, one and a quarter cupfuls of milk or cream, one even tea-spoonful of yeast-powder, butter or lard the size of a walnut, and salt. Mix the baking-powder and...
-Hominy Cake
Add a spoonful of butter to two cupfuls of whole hominy (boiled an hour with milk) while it is still hot. Beat three eggs very light, which add to the hominy. Stir in gradually a pint of milk, and, la...
-Henriettes For Tea (French Cook)
Henriettes For Tea (French Cook), No. 1 Ingredients: Three eggs beaten separately, three-fourths of a cupful of cream or milk, a scant tea-spoonful of baking-powder, salt, one table-spoonful of bra...
-Wafer Biscuits
Rub a piece of butter the size of a large hickory-nut into a pint of sifted flour; sprinkle over a little salt. Mix it into a stiff, smooth paste, with the white of an egg beaten to a froth, and warm ...
-Corn Bread
Ingredients: One cupful of sour milk, one cupful of sweet milk, one table-spoonful of sugar or molasses, one tea-cupful of flour, two heaping tea-cupfuls of corn-meal, one tea-spoonful of salt, one te...
-Hoe Cake
Pour enough scalding water, or milk, on corn-meal (salted), to make it rather moist. Let it stand an hour, or longer. Put two or three heaping table-spoonfuls on a hot griddle, greased with pork or la...
-Corn Cake
Ingredients: One pint of milk, half a pint of Indian meal, four eggs, a scant table - spoonful of butter, salt, and one tea-spoonful of sugar. Pour the milk boiling on the sifted meal. When cold, add ...
-Corn Mush
is usually made by sprinkling corn-meal into well-salted boiling water (a pint of corn-meal to three pints of water), and cooking it well. But Harriet Plater (Mrs. Filley's most skillful cook) says th...
-Oatmeal Porridge
It seems very simple to make oatmeal porridge, yet it is a very different dish, made by different cooks. The ingredients are: One heaping cupful of oatmeal to one quart of boiling water and one tea-sp...
-Mother Johnson's Pancakes (Adirondacks)
These are famous pancakes, and, like every other good thing, there is a little secret in the preparation. Enough flour is added to a quart of sour milk to make a rather thick batter. The secret is ...
-Buckwheat Cakes
Scald two gills of Indian meal in one quart of boiling water. Add a little salt. When cool, add one gill of yeast, and stir in enough buckwheat flour to make a thin batter. Let it rise overnight. If b...
-Pancakes
Pancakes, With Flour Or Corn-Meal Stir one or two cupfuls of cream or milk into two beaten eggs; add flour or corn-meal enough to make a thin batter. If the milk is. sweet, add one tea-spoonful of ...
-Strawberry Short-Cake
Ingredients: One quart of flour, two heaping tea-spoonfuls of yeast-powder, half a tea-spoonful of salt, butter size of an egg, milk, two quarts of strawberries. Mix the baking-powder into the flour, ...
-Tea. Coffee
Two things are necessary to insure good tea: first, that the water should be at the boiling-point when poured on the leaves, water simply hot not answering the purpose at all; and, second, that it sho...
-Chocolate
Allow two sticks of chocolate to one pint of new milk. After the chocolate is scraped, either let it soak an hour or so, with a table-spoonful of milk to soften it, or boil it a few moments in two or ...
-Cocoa Soup
Many use cocoa rather than chocolate. It has the same flavor, but it has more body, and is richer and more oily. It is made in the same way as chocolate, but a few drops of the essence of vanilla shou...
-Stock, or Pot au Feu
In ordinary circumstances, beef alone, with some vegetables will make a good broth or stock, in the proportion of two and a half pints of cold clear water to each pound of bones and meat; the bones an...
-Additions to Beef Stock, to form Other Kinds of Soup
It is well, just before the beef soup is sent to table, to drop into the tureen poached eggs, which have been cooked in salted water, and neatly trimmed. There may be an egg for each person at table. ...
-Receipt For Force-Meat Balls
Take any kind of meat or chicken, or both (that used for making the soup will answer); chop it very fine; season it with pepper, salt, a little chopped parsley and thyme, or a little parsley and fried...
-Gouffe's Receipt For Stock, Or Bouillon
Three pounds of beef; one pound of bone (about the quantity in that weight of meat); five and a half quarts of clear cold water; two ounces of salt; two carrots, say ten ounces; two large onions, say ...
-Amber Soup, Or Clear Broth
This soup is served at almost all company dinners. There can be no better choice, as a heavy soup is not then desirable. Ingredients: A large soup bone (say two pounds), a chicken, a small slice of...
-Noodles
Three delicious dishes may be made from this simple and economical receipt for noodles: To three eggs (slightly beaten), two table-spoonfuls of water, and a little salt, add enough flour to make a ...
-Ox-Tail Soup
Ox-tails make an especially good soup, on account of the gelatinous matter they contain. Ingredients: Two ox-tails, a soup bunch, or a good-sized onion, two carrots, one stalk of celery, a little p...
-Chicken Soup (Potage à La Reine)
Francatelli. Roast a large chicken. Clear all the meat from the bones, chop, and pound it thoroughly with a quarter of a pound of boiled rice. Put the bones (broken) and the skin into two quarts of...
-Purée Of Chicken (Giuseppe Romanii). Chef De Cuisine Of The Cooking - School In New York
Ingredients: One and a half pounds of chicken, one and a half quarts of white stock (made with veal), half a sprig of thyme, two sprigs of parsley, half a blade of mace, one shallot, a quarter of a po...
-Plain Chicken Soup
Cut up the chicken, and break all the bones; put it in a gal-lon of cold water; let it simmer for five hours, skimming it well. The last hour add, to cook with the soup, a cupful of rice and a sprig o...
-Giblet Soup
This soup is a great success. It is very inexpensive, a plate of giblets only costing at market five cents. It is a very good imitation of mock-turtle soup, and, after the first experience in making, ...
-Mock-Turtle Soup (New York Cooking-School)
Let some one beside yourself remove the flesh from a calf's head, viz., cut from between the ears to the nose, touching the bone; then, cutting close to it, take off all the flesh. Turn over the head,...
-Receipt For Egg-Balls
If, instead of the egg-dice, egg-balls should be preferred, add to the yolks of two hard-boiled eggs the raw yolk of one egg, one table-spoonful of melted butter, a little sat and pepper, and enough s...
-Receipt For Meat-Balls
If, instead of meat-dice, meat-balls should be preferred, to three - fourths of a cupful of the head-meat, chopped very fine, add a pinch of thyme, the grated peel of half a lemon, one raw egg, and fl...
-Beef Noodle Soup
Add to a beef stock a small handful of fresh or dried noodles about twenty minutes before serving, which will be long enough time to cook them. Many varieties of soups may be made by adding differe...
-Spring Soup
A stock with any spring vegetables added which have first been parboiled in other water. Those generally used are pease, asparagus-tops, or a few young onions or leeks. This soup is often colored with...
-Asparagus Soup
Ingredients: Three pints of beef soup or stock, thirty heads of asparagus, a little cream, butter, flour, and a little spinach. Cut the tops off the asparagus, about half an inch long, and boil the...
-A Simple Mock-Turtle Soup
Put four pig's feet, or calf's feet, and one pound of veal into four quarts of cold water, and let it simmer for five hours, reducing it to two quarts. Strain it, and let it remain overnight. The next...
-Gumbo Soup
Ingredients: One large chicken; one and a half pints of green gumbo, or one pint of dried gumbo; three pints of wa-ter; pepper and salt. Cut the chickens into joints, roll them in flour, and fry or...
-Mullagatawny Soup (An Indian Soup)
Cut up a chicken; put it into a soup - kettle, with a little sliced onion, carrot, celery, parsley, and three or four cloves. Cover it with four quarts of water. Add any pieces of veal, with the bones...
-Oyster Soup
To one quart, or twenty-five oysters, add a half pint of water. Put the oysters on the fire in the liquor. The moment it begins to simmer (not boil, for that would shrivel the oysters), pour it throug...
-Clam Soup
To extract the clams from the shells, wash them in cold water, and put them all into a large pot over the fire, containing half a cupful of boiling water; cover closely, and the steam will cause the c...
-Bean Soup
Soak a quart of navy beans overnight. Then put them on the fire, with three quarts of water; three onions, fried or sautéd in a little butter; one little carrot; two potatoes, part-ly boiled in other ...
-Onion Soup (Soupe à L'Ognon)
A soup without meat, and delicious. I was taught how to make this soup by a Frenchwoman; and it will be found a valuable addition to one's culinary knowl-edge. It is a good Friday soup. Put into...
-Vegetable Soup Without Meat (Purée Aux Légumes)
Cut up a large plateful of any and all kinds of vegetables one happens to have; for example, onions, carrots, potatoes (boiled in other water), beans (of any kind), parsnips, celery, pease, parsley, l...
-Corn Soup
This is a very good soup, made with either fresh or canned corn. When it is fresh, cut the corn from the cob, and scrape off well all that sweetest part of the corn which remains on the cob. To a pint...
-Tomato Soup, With Rice
Cut half a small onion into rather coarse slices, and fry them in a little hot butter in a sauté pan. Add to them then a quart can, or ten or eleven large tomatoes cut in pieces, after having skinned ...
-Tomato Soup (Purée Aux Tomates)
Mrs. Corbett. Boil a dozen or a can of tomatoes until they are very thor-oughly cooked, and press them through a sieve. To a quart of tomato pulp add a tea-spoonful of soda. Put into a saucepan but...
-Sorrel Soup (Soupe à La Bonne Femme)
This is a most wholesome soup, which would be popular in America if it were better known. It is much used in France, Sorrel can be obtained, in season, at all the French markets in America. For fou...
-Potato Soup
Potato Soup (No. 1) Fry seven or eight potatoes and a small sliced onion in a sauté pan in some butter or drippings - stock-pot fat is most excellent for this purpose. When they are a little colore...
-Purée Of String-Beans
Make a strong stock as follows: Add to a knuckle of veal three quarts of water, a generous slice of salt pork, and two or three slices of onion. Let it simmer for five hours, then pour it through a si...
-Bisque Of Lobsters
This soup is made exactly like the purée of string-beans, with the veal stock and thickened cream, except that, in place of the string-bean pulp, the soup is now flavored and colored with the coral of...
-Fish
If a fish is not perfectly fresh, perfectly cleaned, and thoroughly cooked, it is not eatable. It should be cleaned or drawn as soon as it comes from market, then put on the ice until the time of cook...
-How To Boil Fish
All fish but salmon (which is put into warm water to preserve its color) should be placed in salted cold water, with a little vinegar or lemon-juice in it, to boil. It should then boil very, very gent...
-How To Boil Au Court Bouillon
Among professional cooks, a favorite way of boiling a fish is in water saturated with vegetables, called court bouillon; consequently, a fish cooked in this manner would be called, for instance, Pike...
-Dubois's Receipt
Mince a carrot, an onion, and a small piece of celery; fry them in a little butter, in a stew-pan; add some parsley, some pepper-corns, and three or four cloves. Now pour on two quarts of hot water an...
-How To Fry Fish
By frying fish I mean that it is to be immersed in hot lard, beef drippings, or olive-oil. Let there be a little more fat than will cover the fish; otherwise it is liable to stick to the bottom and bu...
-Fish Fried In Batter
Cut almost any kind of fish in fillets or pieces one-fourth of an inch thick, and one or two inches square; only be careful to have them all of the same shape and size. Sprinkle them with pepper and s...
-How To Broil Fish
The same rule applies to broiling fish as to every thing else. If the fish is small, it requires a clear, hot fire. If the fish is large, the fire must be moderate; otherwise the ontside of the fish w...
-How To Bake Fish
When cleaning the fish, do not cut off the head and tail. Stuff it. Two or three receipts are given for the stuffing. Sew it, or confine the stuffing by winding the cord several times around the fish....
-Stuffings For Fish
Bread Stuffing Soak half a pound of bread-crumbs in water; when the bread is soft, press out all the water. Fry two table-spoonfuls of minced onion in some butter; add the bread, some chopped parsl...
-How To Bake a Fish with Wine
Stuff a fish with the following dressing. Soak some bread in water, squeeze it dry, and add an egg well beaten. Season it with pepper, salt, and a little parsley or thyme; grease the baking-pan (one j...
-How To Stew Fish, Or Fish En Matelote
Cut the fish transversely into pieces about an inch or an inch and a half long; sprinkle salt on them, and let them remain while you boil two or three onions (sliced) in a very little water; pour off ...
-How To Cook Fish Au Gratin
This is a favorite manner with the French of cooking fish. The fish is served in the same dish in which it is cooked. It is called a gratin dish - generally an oval silver-plated platter, or it may...
-Fish A La Creme
Boil a fish weighing four pounds in salted water. When done, remove the skin, and flake it, leaving out the bones. Boil one quart of rich milk. Mix butter size of a small egg with three table-spoonful...
-Salmon
Is undoubtedly best boiled. The only exception to the rule of boiling fish is in the case of salmon, which must be put in hot instead of cold water, to preserve its color. A favorite way of boiling a ...
-Shad
This delicious fish is undoubtedly best broiled, with a maître-d'hôtel sauce; but it is good also cut in slices, and sautéd. ...
-Trout
If large, they may be broiled, boiled, or baked. If boiled or broiled, serve the sauce Hollandaise with them. Professional cooks generally boil it in the court bouillon. Smaller trout are better egged...
-Cod-Fish
Fresh cod-fish is better boiled. The fish is so large that it is generally boiled in slices. After it is well salted, horse-rad-ish and vinegar in the boiling water will improve the fish. Oyster-sauce...
-Fish Chowder
Cut three pounds of any kind of fresh fish (cod-fish is espe-iially good), one and a half pounds of potatoes, and one large onion (three ounces) into slices; also, half a pound of salt pork into half-...
-Various Fish
Small Pan-Fish (Perch, Sun-Fish, Etc.) They are generally preferred peppered, salted, then rolled in salted corn-meal, and fried either in a sauté pan with a little lard and some slices of pork, or...
-Smelts
Are good salted, peppered, and rolled in salted corn-meal or flour, and fried in boiling-hot lard, but better egged and bread-crumb-ed before frying. They should be served immediately, or they will lo...
-Fried Slices of Fish, With Tomato Sauce (Fish à L'Orlay)
Bone and skin the fish, and cut it into even slices; or if a flounder or any flat fish is used, begin at the tail, and, keeping the knife close to the bone, separate each side of the fish neatly from ...
-Eels
How To Fry Eels Skin them, cut them into f our-inch lengths, season them with salt and pepper, roll them in flour or salted corn-meal, and fry them in boiling lard. Some parboil eels and bull-heads...
-Oysters
Raw Oysters Drain them well in a colander, marinate them, i. e., sprinkle over plenty of pepper and salt, and let them remain in a cold place for at least half an hour before serving. This makes a ...
-Oysters. Continued
Scalloped Oysters Ingredients: Three dozen oysters, a large tea-cupful of bread or cracker crumbs, two ounces of fresh butter, pepper and salt, half a tea-cupful of oyster-juice. Make layers of ...
-Clams
Clams Cooked With Cream Chop fifty small clams not too fine, and season them with pepper and salt. Put into a stew-pan butter the size of an egg, and when it bubbles sprinkle in a tea-spoonful of f...
-Crabs And Lobsters
Soft-Shell Crabs Dry them; sprinkle them with pepper and salt; roll them, first in flour, then in egg (half a cupful of milk mixed in one egg), then in cracker-dust, and fry them in boiling lard. ...
-Frogs
Frogs are such a delicacy that it is a pity not to prepare them with care. The hind legs only are used. They may be made into a broth the same as chicken broth, and are considered a very ad-vantage...
-Sauces
The French say the English only know how to make one kind of sauce, and a poor one at that. Notwithstanding the French understand the sauce question, it is very convenient to make the drawn butter, an...
-Sauces. Part 2
Drawn-Butter Sauce Ingredients: Three ounces of butter, one ounce of flour, half a pint of water (or, better, white stock), and a pinch of salt and pepper. Put two ounces of the butter into a st...
-Sauces. Part 3
Oyster Sauce Make a drawn-butter or white sauce; add a few drops of lemon or a table - spoonful of capers, or, if neither be at hand, a few drops of vinegar; add oysters strained from their liquor,...
-Sauces. Part 4
Mushrooms, For Garnish (Gouffe) Separate the button part from the stalk; then peel them with a sharp knife, cutting off merely the skin. Put them into a stew-pan with a table-spoonful of lemon-juic...
-Tomato Sauce
Tomato Sauce (No. 1) Stew six tomatoes half an hour with two cloves, a sprig of parsley, pepper, and salt; press this through a sieve; put a little butter into a saucepan over the fire, and when it...
-Bechamel Sauce
Ingredients: One pint of veal stock (a knuckle of veal put into one gallon of cold water, boiled five hours, skimmed and strained), half an ounce of onion (quarter of a rather small one), quarter of a...
-Sauce Hollandaise, Or Dutch Sauce
As this is one of the best sauces ever made for boiled fish, asparagus, or cauliflower, I will give two receipts. The first is Dubois'; the second is from the Cooking - school in New York. None should...
-Beef
For a roast of beef, the sirloin and tenderloin cuts are con-sidered the best. They are more expensive, and are no better than the best cuts of a rib roast: the sixth, seventh, and eighth ribs are the...
-Beef. Continued
Beefsteak Rolled Procure a round steak, spread over it a layer of almost any kind of force-meat. An ordinary bread, onion, thyme, or parsley dressing, used to stuff turkeys, is very good. Begin, th...
-Braised Beef
Braised Beef (No. 1). - New York Cooking-School Ingredients: Six-pound loin of beef, half a pound of pork, three - fourths of a cupful of flour, two-ounce onion (one sraall onion), three-ounce carr...
-How To Roast Or Bake Beef
A few rules for roasting and baking beef: Allow nine min-utes to the pound for baking a rolled rib-roast; for roasting it, allow ten minutes to the pound. Sirloin roasts require eight minutes to the p...
-Yorkshire Pudding
Ingredients: Six large table - spoonfuls of flour, three eggs (well beaten), one salt-spoonful of salt, enough milk to make it of the consistency of soft custard (about one and a half pints). Add e...
-Beef à La Mode
Six or seven pounds from a round of beef are generally se-lected; however, there is a cut from the shoulder which answers very well for an à-la-mode beef. If the round is used, extract the bone. Make ...
-Fillet Of Beef
I will be very specific about the fillet of beef, as it is easily managed at home, and is very expensive ordered from the restaurateur. His price is generally ten dollars for a dressed and cooked fill...
-How To Trim A Fillet Of Beef
The fillet is the under side of the loin of beef. The steaks cut from this part are called porter-house-steaks. This under side, or fillet, is covered with skin and fat. All the skin and fat must be ...
-How To Cook A Fillet Of Beef
After it is trimmed and larded, put it into a small baking-pan, in the bottom of which are some chopped pieces of pork and beef-suet; sprinkle some salt and pepper over it, and put a large ladleful of...
-How To Make The Mushroom Sauce
Take a ladleful of stock, free from grease, from the stock-pot; add to it part of the juice from the can of mushrooms; thicken it with a little flour and butter mixed (roux); add pepper, salt, and a f...
-How To Garnish A Fillet Of Beef
As I have mentioned before, a fillet of beef is generally served with mushrooms; sometimes with different vegetables à la jardinière; sometimes with French pease; sometimes with potatoes cut into litt...
-How To Braise A Fillet Of Beef
Put the larded fillet into a braising-pan or stew-pan; put in trimmings of pork, onions (with some cloves stuck in), carrots, a little celery (all cut in thick slices), and a bunch of parsley. Salt th...
-How To Trim With Vegetables (à La Jardinière)
Every kind of vegetable is used, such as potatoes, carrots, turnips, beets, small onions, cauliflower - blossoms, asparagus-heads, French beans, pease, etc. The larger vegetables are cut into little f...
-Fillet Of Beef Cut Into Slices Or Scollops
This is a good way of managing the beef that is left from the roast or baked fillet of beef to be served the second day. Cut the fillet, after reheating it in the oven, into slices about three-fourths...
-Choosing Beefsteak
The Dorter-house and tenderloin steaks are best. Of course, there is great difference in the different cuts of these steaks. For a cheap steak, a good cut of what is called chuck-steak is best. It has...
-Corned Beef
A good piece of beef well corned, then well boiled, is a most excellent dish. Put it into the pot with enough cold water to just cover it. When it cornes to a boil, set it on the back of the range,...
-Beef Hash
Notwithstanding this distinguished dish is so much abused, I particularly like it; not swiraming hash, nor onion hash, nor Southern or Western hash, nor yet hash half cooked, but New York hash. I know...
-Meat Pie (French Cook)
Cut cold cooked meat into quite small dice; add pepper, salt, a little nutmeg, and two or three sprigs of chopped pars-ley; also a little thyme and a piece of bay-leaf, if you have them, but the two l...
-Meat Rissoles
For rissoles, cold beef, chicken, veal, tongue, or lamb may be used, separately or mixed. The meat should not be chopped, but cut into quite small dice. It is well to add to it a slight flavoring of c...
-A Cheap Arrangement
Purchase two soup bones (.twenty cents). Boil them four or five hours with a few vegetables (as described lor stock. see page 79). The stock will make two or three soups. Cut up the meat for croquette...
-Mince-Pies (Made From Remnants Of Cold Beef)
A good disposition in winter of cold roast beef is to make with it two or three mince-pies, as by the following receipt: One cupful of chopped meat (quarter of it fat), two cupfuls of apple, one tea-s...
-Calf's Heart
If people generally knew how nice a calf's heart is, if properly cooked, the butchers would never charge so little as ten cents for it. In France, the calf's heart and kidneys are considered great del...
-Tongue
Tongue, With Mustard Pickle Sauce Cut boiled tongue into slices; fry them in a little hot butter, with a sprinkle of minced onion thrown in. Then, for the sauce, take out the slices of tongue; put ...
-Veal
The best pieces of veal are the loin and the fillet. A variety of dishes can be made with veal cutlets and their different accompaniments. Veal is always better cooked with pork or ham. Professional c...
-Veal. Continued
Blanquette Of Veal (French Cook) Cut any kind of veal (say two pounds) into pieces; put it into boiling water, with a little bulb of garlic or slice of onion, and when done throw the meat from the ...
-A Fricandeau Of Veal
What is called a fricandeau of veal is simply a cushion of veal trimmed into shape, larded, and braised. Cut a thick slice (three or four pounds) from a fillet of veal, trim it around as in cut for b...
-Veal Cutlets, Sautéd And Fried
These are cutlets cut from the round, although any veal cutlets may be cooked in the same way. Cut them into equal-sized pieces, beat them a little with a knife to get them into shape; season, egg, an...
-How To Cook Liver
How To Cook Liver (Melanie Lourant), No. 1 Put a little lard into a saucepan, and when hot throw in half an onion minced fine, one or two sprigs of parsley, chop-ped, and the slices of calf's liver...
-Sweet-Breads
Veal sweet-breads are best. They spoil very soon. The moment they come from market, they should be put into cold water, to soak for about an hour; lard them, or rather draw a lardoon of pork through t...
-Sweet-Bread Fritters
Parboil the sweet-breads as before explained, and cut them into slices about half an inch thick; then sprinkle over them pep-per and salt, a little grated nutmeg, some finely chopped parsley, and a fe...
-Mutton
The best roasts are the leg, the saddle, and the shoulder of mutton. They are all roasted according to the regular rules for roasting. In England, mutton is hung some time before cooking. There must b...
-Sheep's Tongues
Sheep's Tongues, With Spinach Braise a number of sheep's-tongues with salt pork, parsley, onion, some whole peppers, a tea-spoonful of sugar, and enough stock to cover them. Let them simmer one and...
-Ragouts (Made Of Pieces Of Mutton, Veal, Beef, Or Rabbits)
Cut the upper parts, or the neck, from a fore-quarter of mut-ton (or take inferior cuts from any part) into pieces for a ragoût; heat a heaping table-spoonful of drippings, or lard, in a saucepan, and...
-Lamb
The best roasts are the fore and hind quarters. Roast Leg Of Lamb Professional cooks serve a roast or baked hind quarter of lamb rather rare, or well done on the outside and pink within. It is r...
-Sheep's Kidneys
The best manner of cooking is to sauté them. They must be perfectly fresh (they spoil soon), sautéd on a quick fire, never allowed to boil in the sauce (this would spoil the gravy), and served with a ...
-Pork
A little salted pork or bacon should always be kept in the house. I confess to having a decided prejudice against this meat, considering it unwholesome and dangerous, especially in cities, unless used...
-Pork. Continued
Pork And Beans Soak a quart of beans overnight. The next day boil them with a sliced onion, one large onion to a quart of beans (they will not taste of the onion), and when they are almost done, pu...
-Ham
How To Cure Hams For one hundred pounds of fine pork take seven pounds of coarse sait, five pounds of brown sugar, two ounces of saltpetre, half an ounce of soda, and four gallons of water. Boil al...
-Poultry
If care is taken in picking and dressing fowls or birds, there is no need of washing them. In France it is never done, unless there is absolutely something to wash off; then it is done as delicately a...
-Roast Turkey
The secret in having a good roast turkey is to baste it often, and to cook it long enough. A small turkey of seven or eight pounds (the best selection if fat) should be roasted or baked three hours at...
-Turkey
Stuffing For Baked Turkey, Chicken, Veal, And Lamb (New York Cooking-School) Soak half a pound of bread (with the crust cut off) in tepid water, then squeeze it dry. Put three ounces of butter into...
-Turkey Galantine, Or Boned Turkey
Choose a fat hen turkey. When dressing it, leave the crop skin (the skin over the breast) whole; cut off the legs, wings, and neck. Now slit the skin at the back, and carefully remove it all around. C...
-Chickens
One is absolutely bewildered at the hundred dishes which are made of chickens. Most of the entrées are prepared with the breasts alone, called fillets. There are boudins and quenelles of fowls, and fi...
-Chickens. Part 2
Fricassee Of Chicken Sauté a chicken (cut into pieces) with a little minced onion, in hot lard. When the pieces are brown, add a table-spoonful of flour, and let it cook a minute, stirring it const...
-Chickens. Part 3
Chicken Cutlets These cutlets are only chicken croquettes in a different form. Prepare them like trimmed lamb chops, in the following man-ner: Make a shape pointed at one end and round at th...
-Chicken Croquettes
Chicken Croquettes (French Cook) Boil one chicken, with an onion and a clove of garlic (if you have it) thrown into the water, add some bones and pieces of beef also; this will make a stock, if you...
-Chetney Of Chicken
Ingredients: One large or two small chickens, one-quart can of tomatoes, butter the size of a pigeon's egg, one table-spoonful of flour, one heaping tea-spoonful of minced onion, one tea-spoonful of m...
-Spring Chickens
The excellence of spring chickens depends as much on feed-insr as on cooking them. If there are conveniences for building a coop, say five feet square, on the ground, where some spring chickens can be...
-Chicken Livers
Chop a little onion, and fry it in butter without allowing it to color; put in the livers and some parsley, and fry or saute them until they are done; take out the livers, add a little hot water or st...
-Turkish Pilau
Truss one chicken (two and a half pounds) for boiling, and cut five pounds of shoulder of mutton (boned) into two pieces, which roll into shape; put some trimmings of pork (enough to keep the meat fro...
-Geese
Roast Goose The goose should be absolutely young. Green geese are best, i. e., when they are about four months old. In trussing, cut the neck close to the back, leaving the skin long enough to turn...
-Ducks
Ducks Truss and stuff them with sage and onions as you would a goose. If they are ducklings, roast them from twenty-five to thirty minutes. Epicures say they like them quite under-done, yet, at the...
-Pigeons
Pigeons Stewed In Broth Unless pigeons are quite young, they are better braised or stewed in broth than cooked in any other manner. In fact, I consider it always the best way of cooking them. Tie t...
-Game
Prairie-Chicken Or Grouse They are generally split open at the back and broiled, rubbing them with butter; yet as all but the breast is generally tough, it is better to fillet the chicken, or cut o...
-Quails
Quails Parboiled And Baked Tie a thin slice of bacon over the breast of each bird; put the quails into a baking-dish, with a little boiling water; cover it closely and set it on top of the range, l...
-Venison
The Saddle Of Venison This is, perhaps, the most distinguished venison dish.. Make rather deep incisions, following the grain of the meat from the top, and insert pieces of pork about one-third of ...
-Rabbits
Rabbits Roasted Skin and dress the rabbits as soon as possible, and hang them overnight. Roast them before a moderate fire, basting them with butter and a little flour when nearly done. Rabbits ...
-Potatoes
Potatoes Boiled Choose those of equal size. They look better when thinly peeled before they are boiled; but it is more economical to boil them before skinning, as careless cooks generally pare away...
-Potatoes. Continued
How To Bake Potatoes The potatoes must be of equal size. Put them into a hot oven and bake until tender. The excellence of baked potatoes depends upon their being served immediately when they are j...
-Saratoga Potatoes
It requires a little plane, or potato or cabbage cutter, to cut these potatoes. Two or three fine, large potatoes (ripe new ones are preferable) are selected and pared. They are cut, by rubbing them o...
-Turnips
The ruta-baga turnips are sweetest and best. Pare and cut them in pieces of equal size; put them into well-salted boiling water, and, when perfectly tender, drain them dry; let them remain a moment on...
-Vegetables
How To Preserve The Color Of Vegetables The French cooks very generally use carbonate of ammonia to preserve the color of vegetables. What would lay on the point of a penknife is mixed in the water...
-Vegetables. Part 2
Peas American mode: First boil the pods, which are sweet and full of flavor, in a little water; skim them out, and add the pease, which boil until tender; add then a little butter, cream, pepper, a...
-Vegetables. Part 3
Lima Beans, With Cream Put a pint of the shelled beans into just enough boiling salt-ed water to cover them, and boil them tender; then drain off the water; add a cupful of boiling milk (or, better...
-Tomatoes
Tomatoes Stewed Pour boiling, water over six or eight large tomatoes to remove the skin, and then cut them into a saucepan. When they begin to boil, pour away a little of the juice; add a small pie...
-Onions
There is no better manner of cooking onions than as follows: Put them into salted boiling water, with a little milk added, and boil them until tender (no longer). Then place them in a baking-pan with ...
-Corn
How To Boil Corn On The Cob At the Saratoga Lake House there is a third specialty of good things. The first is the fried potato, the second is the fresh trout, the third is boiled corn, which is se...
-Cauliflowers
Cauliflower, With White Sauce Trim off the outside leaves, and put the cauliflower into well-salted boiling water. Be careful to take it out as soon as tender, to prevent it dropping into pieces. M...
-Casseroles
Casseroles are generally made of boiled rice, or of mashed boiled potatoes. When of rice, first cook thoroughly with milk, salt, and a little butter; or they may be cooked in broth, with a Little ham ...
-Shells, Or Coquilles
A tasteful variety at table is a course of something served in shells (en coquille). The natural shells (except oyster-shells) are not as pretty as silver shells. Plated silver scallop - shells are no...
-Potting
In England, potting is an every-day affair for the cook. If there be ham, game, tongue, beef, or fish on the table one day, you are quite sure to see it potted on the next day at lunch or breakfast. I...
-Macaroni
Macaroni And Welsh Rare-Bit When the macaroni is cooked as in the preceding receipt, arrange it in the centre of a large hot platter; brown the top with the salamander; place around it, as a garnis...
-Macaroni, With Cheese (London Cooking-School)
Do not wash the macaroni. Throw it, broken into convenient pieces, into boiling water which is well salted; stir or shake it frequently, to prevent its adhering to the bottom of the stew-pan. The mome...
-Macaroni, With Tomato-Sauce
Sauce. - Put butter size of an egg into a saucepan; when it is at the boiling-point, throw in an onion (minced), two sprigs of parsley (chopped fine), and a little pepper. Let it cook five or eight mi...
-Eggs
Boiled Eggs should all be placed in a wire-basket, and put into boiling water. Boil them two minutes and three-quarters precisely. Lord Chesterfield said it was only necessary for him to see a pers...
-Omelets
Nothing is more simple than to make an omelet, yet very few can make one. The eggs stick to the pan, or they are overdone, and tough. Senator Riddle, of Delaware, a decided epicure, took much pleas...
-Omelets. Continued
Omelet, With Ham Throw into the omelet-pan fine-cut shreds of tender ham, with the butter. When the ham has cooked a moment, throw in the eggs, and proceed as for plain omelet. A little chopped par...
-Omelet Soufflé
Although it is a simple thing to make an omelet soufflé, and although in France there is not one cook in a score who can not make a delicious one for any and every occasion, I would not advise a carel...
-Salads
In an English book is told a story of a famous French salad-dresser who began very poor, and made a fortune by dressing salad for dinners in London. He would go from one place to another in his carnag...
-Combinations
1. Lettuce (French Cook) Rub garlic in the dish in which lettuce, with French dressing (without onion), is to be served. Leave no pieces of the garlic - merely rubbing the dish will give flavor eno...
-String-Beans In Salad (French Cook)
String the beans and boil them whole; when boiled tender, and they have become cold, slice them lengthwise, cutting each bean into four long slices; place them neatly, the slices all ly-ing in one dir...
-Chicken Salad
Boil a young tender chicken, and when cold separate the meat from the bones; cut it into little square blocks or dice; do not mince it. Cut white tender stalks of celery into about three quarter-inch ...
-Mayonnaise Of Salmon
Remove the skin and bones from a piece of salmon, boiled and cooled, and cut it into pieces two inches long. Marinate them, i. e., place them in a dish, and season them with salt, pepper, a little oil...
-Salad Sauces
Sauce à La Ravingote Here is Carême's receipt for it: Take a good handful of chervil, together with some tarragon, and a few cives. When these herbs have been washed, put them into boiling water ...
-Mayonnaise Sauce
Put the uncooked yolk of an egg into a cold bowl; beat it well with a silver fork; then add two salt-spoonfuls of sait, and one salt-spoonful of mustard powder; work them well a minute before adding t...
-French Dressing
Ingredients: One table-spoonful of vinegar, three table-spoonfuls of olive-oil, one salt-spoonful of pepper, one salt-spoonful of salt, one even tea-spoonful of onion scraped fine. Many use tarragon v...
-Fritters
French Fritter Batter (French Cook), No. 1 Put a heaping cupful of flour into a bowl; add two yolks of eggs, a table-spoonful of olive oil, which is better than melted butter, and one or two table-...
-Fried Cream (Crème Frite)
Every one should try this receipt: It will surprise many to know how soft cream could be enveloped in the crust, while it is an exceedingly good dish for a dinner course, or for lunch or tea. When the...
-Pastry
Professional cooks use butter for pastry. Puff paste should never be attempted with lard or a half mixture of it. If lard or clarified beef suet is used, the pastry of an indiffèrent cook will be impr...
-Pastry. Continued
A Plain Apple-Pie Slice pippin apples, and put them between two layers of pie-paste, with enough water to keep them moist. When they are baked, lift the crust carefully off with a knife, and put it...
-Mince-Pies
Mince-Pies (Mrs. Bonner), No. 1 Ingredients: Four pounds of lean, cold boiled meat chopped fine, nine pounds of apples chopped fine, one and a half pounds of suet chopped fine, three pounds of rais...
-Lemon-Pie
Lemon-Pie (Mrs. Hunt), No. 1 Ingredients: One heaping table-spoonful of corn starch, one cupful of boiling water, one cupful of sugar, one egg, one table-spoonful of butter, and one small lemon. ...
-Puff Paste
Ingredients: One pound of flour, three-quarters of a pound of butter, yolks of two eggs, a little salt, a sprinkle of sugar, a little very cold (or, better, ice-cold) water. (All the professional cook...
-Careme's Receipt For Puff Paste
Ingredients: Twelve ounces of fine sifted flour, twelve ounces of butter, two drams of fine salt, and the yolks of two eggs beaten. Manner of working: Having placed twelve ounces of flour on the bo...
-Chess-Pie
A gentleman friend spoke to me so often about a wonderfully delicious pie that a lady friend in the country made, that it is not surprising that a person of my culinary tastes should have been very cu...
-Small Vols-Au-Vent, Or Patty-Cases
Make puff paste as before described; give it six or seven turns, wetting the top of the paste, before turning it the last time, with water or a little lemon-juice; roll it out evenly about a third of ...
-Oysters For Vols-Au-Vent, Scallop-Shells, Or Served On Buttered Toast For Breakfast
Oysters For Vols-Au-Vent, Scallop-Shells, Or Served On Buttered Toast For Breakfast (No. 1) Bring a canful or a quart of oysters to the boiling-point in their liquor; then drain them. Put butter th...
-Yols-Au-Vent
Yols-Au-Vent Of Sweet-Breads Prepare the sweet-breads as described in receipt for frying them in the saute pan (see page 152), preparing also the same cream-sauce. After the sweet-breads are cooked...
-Canning
This is a most valuable manner of preserving vegetables and fruits. In cities where vegetables, fruits, or berries are bought at high prices, and perhaps not entirely fresh at that, my experience has ...
-How To Can Tomatoes
Let them be entirely fresh. Put scalding water over them to aid in removing the skins. When the cans with their cov-ers are in readiness upon the table, the red sealing-wax (which is generally too bri...
-Preserves
To make clear, good preserves requires: 1st. No economy of trouble; 2d. That the fruit be perfectly fresh, alive from the tree or bush, or, as a friend says, tasting of the sun. The French make t...
-Preserves. Continued
Quince Preserves Pare, core, and quarter the quinces. Select the best-looking quarters for the preserves; the inferior-looking ones reserve, with the cores and skins, for the marmalade. For the ...
-Sirup For Preserves
Put two pounds of the best white sugar, with one pint of fresh, clear water, into a white porcelain saucepan; put it on the fire, and before the sirup becomes hot mix well into it the partly beaten wh...
-Marmalades
To produce the best marmalades, choose ripe and luscious fruits. Cut them into pieces, and put them into the preserving-kettle with layers of sugar, placing fruit at the bottom. For marmalades of p...
-Currant Jelly
Follow the preceding directions. A jelly of prettier color is obtained by mixing the white and red currants. Some take the trouble to make jelly from the white and red currants separately, then harden...
-How To Jelly Fruits
To make jelly clear, the fruit must be quite fresh, and all blemishes removed. Have the flannels used for straining perfectly clean and white. Nearly all jellies are made in the same way, whether curr...
-Compotes
are fresh fruits boiled when needed, with very little sugar. I consider it a pity to cook or stew peaches, when they are so much better fresh, with sugar sprinkled over them and half-frozen. And what ...
-Pickles And Catchups
Pickles, For Country Use Make a brine strong enough to bear the weight of an egg. Into this put cucumbers fresh from the garden. They will keep in this brine indefinitely. Whenever fresh pickles ar...
-Pickles And Catchups. Continued
Pickled Walnuts Ingredients: One hundred walnuts, salt and water, one gallon of vinegar, two ounces of whole black pepper, half an ounce of cloves, one ounce of allspice, one ounce of root ginger s...
-Cheese
In England, and at almost every well - appointed table in America, cheese is a positive necessity to a good table. Brillât Savarin, in his Physiologie du Gout, says, Un beau dîner sans vieux fromag...
-Ramekins
Ramekins (Ramequins À La Ude, Cook To Louis XVI.) Ingredients: Four ounces of grated high-flavored cheese, two ounces of butter, two ounces of bread (without crust), a scant gill of milk, one-third...
-Welsh Rare-Bit
Toast carefully thin square or diamond-shaped slices of bread, with the crust removed. While hot, butter them slightly; then dip them for a moment in a pan containing enough hot water to half cover th...
-Sweet Sauces For Puddings
Butter Sauce Ingredients: Three-quarters of a cupful of butter, one and a half cupfuls of powdered sugar, four table-spoonfuls of boiling-hot starch, made of flour or corn starch, with either brand...
-Puddings
Pudding With Remains Of Plum-Pudding Line a charlotte mold or basin with slices of cold plum-pudding, cut so that they will fit closely together. Fill the inside with a sufficient quantity of gelat...
-Puddings. Part 2
Minute-Pudding Ingredients: One quart of milk, salt, two eggs, about a pint of flour. Beat the eggs well; add the flour and enough milk to make it smooth. Butter the saucepan, and put in the rem...
-Puddings. Part 3
Batter-Puddings Baked Ingredients: One quart of sifted flour, butter the size of an egg, one pint of milk, half a tea-spoonful of salt, four eggs. Scald the milk, and melt the butter in it. When...
-Puddings. Part 4
Cocoa-Nut Pudding When the preceding pudding is just finished, add half a cocoa-nut grated; put it into a mold. Serve with whipped-cream around it, or a sauce of boiled custard made with the yolks ...
-Puddings. Part 5
Baked Apples Pare and core large, juicy pippins, without cutting them to pieces; fill the cavities with sugar, and a little lemon-juice or extract, and some thin slices of the yellow part of the le...
-Plum-Pudding, With Rum Or Brandy (Gouffê)
Take three-quarters of a pound of chopped suet, three-quar-ters of a pound of stoned raisins, three-quarters of a pound of currants, quarter of a pound of citron, three-quarters of a pound of sugar, t...
-Plum-Pudding
Ingredients: One cupful of butter, one cupful of sugar, half a cupful of cream, half a cupful of rum, one cupful of ale, one cupful of suet (chopped), one cupful of fruit (currants and raisins), half ...
-Corn-Starch Pudding
Ingredients: One and one-half pints of rich milk, one large heaping table-spoonful of corn starch, one scant cupful of sugar, four eggs, omitting two whites, a little salt, and flavoring. Bring the...
-Custards
Blanc-Mange Put half a paper of gelatine, two ounces of sugar, half of the very thin rind of a lemon, and eight bitter almonds, blanched and bruised, into a pint of milk, and let it stand an hour. ...
-Boiled Custard
Boiled Custard (No. 1.) I will venture a receipt for boiled custard (perhaps it should be granted that every one knows how to make it), as it is so often used in making many kinds of dessert, and a...
-Bavarian Creams
There is not a more delicious dessert than that of Bavarian cream. These creams are exceedingly easy to make, and, as they are prepared some time before dinner, they have the ad-vantage of being out o...
-Charlotte-Russe
The sponge-cake may be made with four eggs, one cupful of sugar, one and one-half cupfuls of flour, and two even tea-spoon-fuls of yeast powder, or as described for sponge jelly-cake (sec page 300). ...
-Desserts Of Rice
How To Boil Rice Always cook rice with plenty of salt; it is insipid without it. It is sometimes cooked in a steamer, with milk, without stirring it; although it is more quickly cooked by soaking i...
-Rice Souffle
Ingredients: Half a cupful of rice, one even cupful of sugar, one pint of milk, butter the size of a butter-nut, half a lemon, five eggs. Throw the rice into boiling salted water, and let it boil f...
-Wine Jellies
Lemon Jelly Ingredients: Half a box of gelatine soaked in half a pint of water, juice of five large lemons, two cupfuls of loaf-sugar, or sugar to taste, beaten white and shell of an egg one and a ...
-Calf's-Foot Jelly
I have made calf's-foot jelly twice, and never intend to make it again. I would not have made it the second time, except for the purpose of succeeding, and getting a reliable receipt for this book. At...
-Macedoine Of Fruits
This is made with any kind of jelly; however, jelly made with Champagne or sherry is preferable. Any of the delicate fruits of the season, such as grapes, cherries, peaches, strawberries, raspberries,...
-Fancy Jellies
Jelly is sometimes formed in a mold with a cylindrical tube in the centre; the open space in the centre is then filled with whipped cream. Then, to be still more fanciful, the whipped cream may be dot...
-Wine Jelly
Ingredients: One box of gelatine soaked in one pint of clear cold water, one pint of wine, the juice and the thin cuts of rinds of three lemons, one and three-quarter pounds of loaf-sugar, one quart o...
-Orange Jelly (Molded With Quarters Of Oranges)
Ingredients: Eight oranges, two lemons, three-quaters of a box of gelatine soaked in half a pint of cold water, three-quarters of a pound of loaf-sugar, one pint of boiling water, beaten whites and sh...
-Jumbles
Ingredients: Two cupfuls of sugar, three eggs (beaten separately); one cupful of butter, just enough flour to roll it out. Mix quickly, and roll it thin. Cut out the cakes with a round cake-cutter,...
-Cake
Rules for Cake. - Have every thing ready before mixing the material - i. e., the ingredients all measured and prepared, and the tins buttered. The sooner the cake is mixed (after the ingredients are r...
-Cake. Part 2
Crullers Beat three eggs well with four table-spoonfuls of sugar; add four or five table-spoonfuls of melted lard, then flour enough to make it not too stiff. Roll rather thin (one-third of an inch...
-Cake. Part 3
Chocolate-Cake Make a cup-cake with the following ingredients: One cupful of butter, two cupfuls of sugar, three cupfuls of flour, one cupful of milk, four eggs beaten separately, one tea-spoonful ...
-Cake. Part 4
How To Blanch Almonds Put them over the fire in cold water, and let them remain until the water is almost at the boiling-point, not allowing them to boil; then throw them into cold water. Remove th...
-Frosting
The old way of making frosting was a half-day's work. 1 now laugh at the extra exertion once made to be sure that the eggs were sufficiently and properly beaten. The following is the true way to make ...
-Meringues à La Crème
Ingredients: Six whites of eggs, nine ounces of pulverized sugar, half a pint of cream (whipped), three ounces of sugar with the cream, a slight flavoring of vanilla. Whip the eggs to a very stiff ...
-Sponge-Cake
This is the most perfect of sponge-cakes, when properly made. Ingredients: Ten eggs, one pound of pulverized sugar, half a pound of flour, juice of half a large lemon, with the rind grated. Afte...
-White Cake
I venture to say there is not to be found a better receipt for white cake than the following. The cake is mixed contrary to the usual rules for making cake, but it is the best mode for making it fine-...
-Candies
Caramels Ingredients: One cupful of best sirup, one cupful of brown sugar, one cupful of white sugar, two cupfuls of grated chocolate, two cupfuls of cream, vanilla, one tea-spoonful of flour mixed...
-Ices
With a patent five-minute freezer (it really takes, however, from fifteen minutes to half an hour to freeze any thing), it is as cheap and easy to make ices in summer as almost any other kind of desse...
-Ices. Part 2
Delmonico Vanilla Cream Ingredients: One and a half pints of cream, one ounce of isinglass, one pound of sugar, yolks of eight eggs, half a pint of milk, vanilla powder. Scald the cream only; th...
-Ices. Part 3
Frozen Fruit Custard Ingredients: One pint of rich milk, one pint of cream (whipped), yolks of three eggs, one and a half cupfuls of sugar, one pint of fresh peaches cut into pieces not too small, ...
-Ices. Part 4
Iced Pudding Ingredients: One and one-half pints of custard, composed of the yolks of four eggs, a pint of boiled milk, four table spoonfuls of sugar, a flavoring of vanilla, eight ounces of fruits...
-Biscuit Glaces
Biscuit Glaces, In Small Cases Beat well eight yolks of eggs, with ten ounces of sugar, and a very little salt; add one pint of cream. Stir over the fire until slightly thickened. Flavor with vanil...
-Iced Rice-Pudding (Francatellï)
Wash and parboil half a pound of rice; then put it into a stew-pan, with a quart of milk and a pint of cream, two sticks of vanilla, three-quarters of a pound of sugar, and a little salt Allow the ric...
-Cookery For The Sick
I believe it is the general practice now to give a patient, in almost every kind of illness, food that is very nourishing, yet very digestible, that the system may become strengthened to throw off its...
-Receipts For The Sick-Room
Tea Tea is best, made fresh in the sick-room. A little tête-à-tête china service is a pretty ornament for a bedroom, and it is a convenient and tasteful arrangement for serving tea to invalids. If ...
-Receipts For The Sick-Room. Part 2
Chicken Custard Ingredients: One half-pint of chicken broth, beaten yolks of three eggs, a little salt. Mix well, and cook it in the custard-kettle (as for boiled custard) until it has thickened. S...
-Receipts For The Sick-Room. Part 3
How To Prepare An Uncooked Egg This is a delicate, strengthening, and valuable preparation for an invalid. Beat well the yolk and a tea-spoonful of sugar in a goblet; then stir in one or two tea...
-Receipts For The Sick-Room. Part 4
Jelly And Ice (For Fever Patients) Break ice into small pieces about as large as a pea; mix with it about the same quantity of lemon jelly, also cut into little pieces. This is very refreshing. ...
-Receipts For The Sick-Room. Part 5
Panada Sprinkle a little salt or sugar between two large Boston, soda, or Graham crackers, or hard pilot-biscuit; put them into a bowl; pour over just enough boiling water to soak them well; put th...
-Beefsteak
Cut out the tender part of the beef from a porter-house or a tenderloin steak. The slice from these steaks, if large, can be cut in two, as it is sufficient for two meals for an invalid. Let it be thr...
-Arrangement Of Dishes For Invalids
Mutton-Chop Scrape the bone, and trim the chop into good shape; this adds much to the appearance, and requires but little time for one chop. Rub a little butter on both sides, and broil it carefull...
-Prepared Foods For Invalids, Etc
I am indebted to Dr. Franklin, of St. Louis, for this little chapter. Appreciating his experience in the uses of prepared foods for invalids, I asked his advice about certain ones, when he kindly sent...
-Some Dishes For "Baby."
No particular diet can be recommended for the infant that is so unfortunate as to be deprived of its natural nourishment. What agrees with one is quite unsuccessful with another. Different kinds of di...
-Food For Infants With Weak Digestive Organs
Oatmeal Gruel (Dr. Rice, Of Colorado), No. 1 Add one tea-cupful of oatmeal to two quarts of boiling water, slightly salted; let this cook for two hours and a half, then strain it through a sieve. W...
-How To Serve Fruits
The French deserve much praise for their taste in arranging fruits for the table. They almost invariably serve them with leaves, even resorting to artificial ones in winter. In the following arrang...
-How They Eat Oranges In Havana
A fork is pierced partly through the centre of an orange, entering it from the stem side; the fork serves for a handle, which is held in the left hand, while with a sharp knife the peel and thin skin ...
-Beverages
Roman Punch Make or purchase lemon ice. Just before serving, put enough for one person at table into a saucer or punch-glass, and pour over two table - spoonfuls of the milk punch, made as in the l...
-Punch
Rub loaf-sugar over the peels of six lemons to break the little vessels and absorb the ambrosial oil of the lemons. Then squeeze out ail the juice possible from six oranges and six lemons, removing th...
-Milk Punch
Ingredients: Four quarts of Jamaica rum, three quarts of water, five pints of boiling milk, three pounds of loaf-sugar, twenty-four lemons, two nutmegs. cut thin slices, or only the yellow part of ...
-Suitable Combination Of Dishes
There are dishes which seem especially adapted to be served together. This should be a matter of some study. Of course, very few would serve cheese with fish, yet general combinations are often very c...
-Serving Cheese
Cheese is served just before the dessert. It is English to serve celery or cucumbers with it. Thin milk crackers or wafer biscuits (put into the oven just a moment before serving, to make them crisp) ...
-Serving Of Wines
At dinners of great pretension, from eight to twelve different kinds of wines are sometimes served. This is rather ostentatious than elegant. In my judgment, neither elegance nor good taste is display...
-Blll-Of-Fare Table
Bills of fare can be easily made by selecting more or less dishes, and serving them in the order indicated in the table. The dishes are to be garnished as explained in receipts. lst Course. - Raw o...
-How To Prepare Company Dinners
It is very simple to prepare a dinner served à la Russe, as it matters little how many courses there may be. If it were necessary to prepare many dishes, and to have them all hot, and in perfection at...
-A Winter Dinner
Oysters on the half-shell. Amber soup. Salmon; sauce Hollandaise. Sweet-breads and pease. Lamb-chops; tomato-sauce. Fillet of beef, with mushrooms. Roast quails; Saratoga potatoes. ...
-Dinner Bill Of Fare
Roman punch. Giblet soup. Little vols-au-vent of oysters. Smelts; tomato-sauce. Scolloped chickens (en coquille); Bechamel sauce. Saddle of venison; potatoes à la neige. Breasts of quai...
-Dinner Bill Of Fare (Spring)
Macaroni, clear soup, with grated cheese. Salmon; lobster-sauce; cucumbers. Chicken croquettes; tomato-sauce. Sweet-breads in cases, or in silver scallop-shells; sauce Bechamel. Fillet of ...
-Dinner Bill Of Fare (Winter)
Oysters served in block of ice. Julienne soup (can purchase it canned). Soft-shell crabs. Sweet-breads; tomato-sauce. Braised pigeons, with spinach. Fillet of beef; sauce Hollandaise. ...
-Dinner Bill Of Fare (Winter) 2
Mock-turtle soup (can be purchased canned). Boiled white-fish, garnished with potatoes au naturel and olives; sauce Hollandaise. Fried oysters; cold slaw. Casserole of sweet-breads; cream-sau...
-Dinner Bill Of Fare (Winter) 3
Oysters on half shell. Amber soup. Fish croquettes (pear-shape), garnished with parsiey. Rice casserole, filled with blanquette of chicken. Roast beef (ribs rolled), with a circle of mashe...
-Dinner Bill Of Fare (Summer)
Clear amber soup. Fried cuts of fish, with tomato-sauce. Sweet-breads and cauliflowers (cream dressing over both). Croquettes of chicken (in form of cutlets), with pease. Roast lamb; caper...
-A Simple Dinner For Four Persons (Menu)
Soup, with fried bread (aux croûtons). Chicken, with rice (see page 177). Macaroni, with tomato-sauce (see page 210). Lettuce, with Mayonnaise dressing. Corn-starch pudding (page 275), wit...
-English And French Glossary
Soups Amber or clear soup....................Consommé de buf clair. Soup, with bread..........................Potage aux croûtons. Soup, with vegetables....................Consommé aux ...
-English And French Glossary. Continued
Sweet-Breads Sweet-breads, with macaroni...........Ris de veau à la Milanaise. Sweet-breads, with tomato-sauce.......Ris de veau à la sauce tomate. Sweet-breads, with pease................Ris...
-Valuable And Interesting Books
Published by Harper & Brothers, New York. For a full List of Books suitable for Libraries published by Habper & Brothers, see Harper's Catalogue, which may be had gratuitously on application to the...
-Valuable And Interesting Books. Part 2
Hildreth's United States History of the United States. First Series: From the Discovery of the Continent to the Organization of the Government under the Federal Constitution. Second Series: From th...
-Valuable And Interesting Books. Part 3
Writings And Speeches Of Samuel J. Tilden Edited by John Bigelow. 2 vols., 8vo, Cloth, Gilt Tops and Uncut Edges, $6 00 per set. General Dix's Memoirs Memoirs of John Adams Dix. Compiled by h...
-Valuable And Interesting Books. Part 4
Coleridge's Works The Complete Works of Samuel Tay-lor Coleridge. With an Introductory Essay upon his Philosoph. ical and Theological Opinions. Edited by Professor W. G. T. Shedd. With Steel Portra...
-Valuable And Interesting Books. Part 5
Livingstones Last Journals The Last Journals of David Livingstone, in Central Africa, from 1865 to his Death. Continued by a Narrative of his Last Moments, obtained from his Faithful Servants Chuma...







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