The lunch basket should have sufficient bottom surface to allow sandwiches, etc., to lie without piling. It should be sufficiently roomy to admit of a glass for water, as neither the child at school nor the man at his work should drink from' a public cup. There should be room for a small plate, as a piece of pie, even though not always best for the stomach, makes a pleasant variety at times.

Child's Lunch Basket

Child's Lunch Basket

Whether a basket or a tin pail is the better receptacle, let each person decide for himself. The lunch must be protected from dust, and if a basket is used, there is necessarily an extra napkin about the lunch to prevent evaporation, as well as to protect from the dust. A tin pail often causes an unpleasant combination of flavors if the lunch stands long. Sandwiches necessarily form a portion of all lunches, and they keep far better when wrapped in paraffine paper. The aim should be to give some substantial sandwiches and some daintier ones each day. A variety should be given on different days. Fruit of some kind should always form a portion of a lunch. For children's lunches, the cake used should be something simple, as sponge cake, ginger bread, etc.

Such vegetables as can be carried, as celery, lettuce, tomatoes, and radishes, accompanied only by a little salt, are often relished by children. The first two vegetables make sandwiches which are enjoyed by both adults and children.