Baronne De Mello

Size - medium. Form - obovate, acute pyriform. Stem - short, stout, fleshy at the base. Color - yellowish russet. Flesh - greenish white, melting and juicy, with an agreeable, tolerably rich, sub-acid flavor. Season - October 15th. Will probably class as "very good" A strong grower on the quince, producing abundantly.

Baronne Prevost

Deep Rose, very large and fine; free bloomer; vigorous grower.

Barry's Fruit Garden

A new edition of this old standard volume will be issued the coming summer. Mr. Barry has revised it and added much new matter and illustration. It is a work we have always held in high appreciation, and are glad that its author has at last been induced to re-issue it in an improved form.

Bartlett

Perfect in ail the qualities that has ever been attributed to it. It follows close upon the Bloodgood in ripening, and is perhaps the most profitable pear of the season, when one has a near and ready market. The Bartlett is a vigorous grower, and a great bearer; and may, by proper care, be kept in eating two to three weeks, - but if over kept, is worthless.

Bartlett #1

Every one knows that this old variety is the best market pear in cultivation. Although not at the top of the list so far as quality is concerned, its many other unapproachable properties render it par excellence the market pear of the South. In any market pear orchard that we should hereafter plant, the Bartlett would make up at least one-half.

Bartlett's Polar Refrigerator

We know this as an excellent invention for domestic use, but it has occurred to us that it might be valuable for keeping summer fruits, its cool dry atmosphere being favorable for that purpose. Have any of our readers tried it?

Baskets For Forwarding Conifers

The growing of each plants in baskets instead of pots is not a new idea, but it is a good one, as (provided the basket is of some size) the plants can hare all the advantage of house room in their young state, and, when desired, can be planted out, basket and all, without the roots being matted into a ball, or somewhat injured by disentangling them, so likely to be the result when plants are continued any time in pots.

Batchelor, Or King Apple

Batohelor, or King Apple; fruit of the largest size: roundish, broader at the base, a little flattened; skin, lemon yellow, washed with lively red on the sunny side, sometimes obscurely striped with the same and sparsely sprinkled with greyish specks; calyx, small, open in a rather deep basin; stalk, usually very short, thick, and inserted in a moderate regular cavity, which is often russeted; flesh, white, tender, fine grained, juicy, and of a most agreeable sub-acid flavor. Ripens in October and November.

Batchelor Apple. King Apple

Batchelor Apple.

This magnificent fruit originated in North Carolina. The description above was taken from fruit furnished at the same time with the drawing, by J. Van Buren, Esq., Clarksville, Ga. I have known no better apple in its season. Wm. N. White, Athens, Ga.