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For THE HORTICULTURIST.

Preparation Of The Ground

The land should be ploughed and harrowed smooth ; then open furrows eight feet apart; if muck is convenient, it is valuable to spread along them ; then set the plants about four feet distant, on the muck. The roots will mostly follow along the row to feed on the muck, and grow more vigorously than lateral or side roots. Hence, the strongest and best plants will come up along the row, nearly where they are wanted to produce fruit the following year. They should not be left to stand closer together than an average of one plant to a foot in length in the rows.

Preparing Yams For Root Grafts

Last winter, observing a nurseryman preparing cotton yarn for tying root grafts, by drawing the thread singly through the melted wax, I suggested the cutting of the skeins in suitable lengths and dipping both ends about one and a half inches in the. wax, and pressing with a case knife against the side of the kettle to squeeze out the surplus wax. The experiment was tried and found to answer as well as the all-waxed yarn, and not one-tenth part of the labor to prepare it.

St. Joseph, Mick.

The Preservation Of Eggs

A writer in the Farm and Fireside recommends the dissolving of gum shellac in alcohol, when the mixture may be applied with a common paint-brush. When dry, pack in bran, points downward. Eggs so preserved will keep a very long time. When about to bo used, the varnish may be washed off.

Preservation Of Quinces

My Quinces were gathered carefully, about the 1st of October, and spread upon sheets in an unoccupied room, where those left for family use remained until freezing cold weather. They were then carefully taken up in a tin pan, and placed in a cool, dry cellar. A portion of these were made up on the 8th of March, being in a tolerable state of preservation; that is, three-fourths of them sound. Fruit carried a distance and sold in market, could not of course be thus kept C.E. GOODRICH. - Ulica. N. Y.