It must be stated also, that even in situations where the traffic over them is considerable, they will soon cease to afford either comfort or enjoyment Necessity, therefore, compels the adoption of a surface less or more convex as the circumstances may appear to demand. Walks in private gardens are little used in wet weather, and therefore they are not likely to be much disturbed at such a period, which is the time above all others when excessive traffic breaks up their surface. The water does not pass off, but is held in the loose gravel until they become almost impassable, which is m fact the case in all public walks so constructed, as was formerly notoriously exemplified in the Society's Garden on wet exhibition days previous to their being altered. It therefore becomes clear that situation, and the uses for which walks are required, should materially influence the operator as to the proportion of convexity which they should receive.

Some entertain an idea that walks should only maintain a very subordinate position in garden arrangements, that they should be kept as much as possible out of sight, and that their appearance should be only a matter of necessity; but such notions are only applicable to garden wildernesses, and have no relation to gardening as an art of design. It might be urged, with quite as much consistency, that the door of a mansion should be hidden or obscured, being only a means to an end. Those at all acquainted with the classical and decorative style adopted in some of the best examples of Continental gardening will readily understand this, where indeed walks constitute quite as important a feature in geometrical gardening as windows do in the elevation of a building; they illustrate in fact a material part in the composition. Divest a garden of walks, and the main lines which mark out its form and proportions are destroyed. As roads are to a country evidences of the degree of its civilization, so walks in a garden are indications of the amount of artistical skill brought to bear upon it Take as an example a garden planted with all possible taste, and with the most decorative flowers which can be selected, and I would ask what satisfaction could such an arrangement produce in a mind cultivated and refined by a high social position, or how could such a garden be enjoyed! Walks contrasting with turf and flowers, conduce to a harmony in the composition which the two latter of themselves never could accomplish.

Where artistic gardening has been carried to its utmost limits consistent with propriety and good taste, and where numerous architectural and sculptural embellishments have been introduced, walks are then frequently elevated above the general level. To accomplish this, stone edgings have in some instances been used, and in others, where the style admits of more elaborate embellishment* walls of solid masonry as edgings have been employed in order to raise the walks above the level of the garden, so that the eye may look down upon the flower beds, and more perfectly view the general arrangement and design.

It has been attempted by some to lay down rules as to the direction which walks should take, and also their width; such, however, can be of little service, as local circumstances must nearly in every instance determine this. It may be stated, however, as a principle, that where walks take a straight direction and are level, or upon a uniform inclination, the width roust bear a relative proportion to the length; for example, a walk ten feet wide may look very well if the length does not exceed two hundred feet; but supposing it to be two thousand feet, the proportion would then be entirely destroyed. These, and other matters of detail, must be left to the operator. R. Glendinning F.H.S., in Journal of the Horticultural Society, London.

Garden Walks #1

The growth of weeds in gravel walks has been securely prevented, by forming a solid bottom beneath the gravel, of marl and coarse gravel or small stones, rammed down bard, and through which no weeds nor grass can penetrate.

Church in the Lombard Style.

Church in the Lombard Style.

Garden Walks 70038

Garden Walks #1

To make good dry walks, that may be used with pleasure and comfort at all times, take three parts screened gravel, one part flour of lime (previously riddled), add as much coal tar as will make it of the consistence of stiff mortar; if the tar is heated, it will bo easier to work. For ordinary garden walks, this should be laid on from two to two and a-half inches thick ; it should be slightly thicker in the center than at the sides, which should be one inch below the edge, the center of the walk being the same height as the grass edge.

Smooth over and beat the surface with the back of the spade as the work proceeds. If the black color be an objection, take three parts of sand and one part of lime, mix well together, and sift a little over the surface while still moist, and roll well. Walks made this way have lasted with us over 13 years, and are as good as ever. Care must be taken to have them laid upon a firm basis. These walks nave a great many advantages over ordinary gravel walks ; they are always dry, grow no weeds, and are much more easily swept. Wheeling of manure and soil can be done at any time, and very much more quickly and easily. - Foreign Exchange.