Your correspondent "Querist" "built last year a small green-house, with the view of having cut-flowers regularly through the winter, for a center-table." He "was very much disappointed, and, under present circumstances, wishes he had his eight hundred dollars back again." His case is a common one. Many will thank him fur bringing it thus prominently forward; and I trust I shall not be the only one of your "practical correspondents" who will proffer him a helping hand, as the subject is so extensive, and at the same time so worthy of consideration, that the little we have been taught by experience only leads the wisest of us to understand how very much of it there is yet to learn.

In this article I confine myself entirely to plants adapted to form material for boquets and baskets. They are in all cases such as I have myself used for this purpose, and all of them are easily to be had from most florists.

The spring of the year is the proper season to make arrangements for a stock of winter-blooming plants. I will suppose that we have nothing to commence with, and have to order a stock of green-house plants to form the nucleus of a permanent collection. I should select the following:

YELLOW.

Name.

Time of Flowering.

Acacia armata,

Feb. and March.

" verticillata,

" "

" linearis,

" "

u pubescens,

" "

" pulchella,

" "

Coronilla glauca,

Dec to March.

Jasminum revolutum,

" "

" nudiflorum,

" "

Mahernia odorata,

Feb. and March.

Cytisus racemosus,

Dec to January.

ORANGE-COLORED.

* Abutilon striatum,

Oct. to April

Cheiranthus Marshallii,

Dec to Feb.

Chorizenia varium,

Nov. to March.

" cordata,

Jan. to March.

* Cestrum aurantiacum,

Oct to Feb.

* Mannettia bicolor,

Oct. to March.

*Lantana cracea,

" "

Tropaeolum Lobbianum,

" "

WHITE.

Alaysia citriadora,

Nov. to Feb.

Cyclamen Persicum,

Nov. to March.

Name.

Time of Flowering.

Epacris paludasa,

Feb. and March.

" nivalis,

Jan. and Feh

Eupatorium canescens,

Nov. to Jan.

Fabiana imbricata,

Feb. and March.

Jasminum grandiflorum,

Sept. to Dec.

* Jasminum azoricum,

" cc

Primula sinensis, d'ble white,

Sept. to March.

Solatium jasminoides,

" "

Stevia serrata,

Oct. to Jan.

Viburnum tinus,

Oct. to March.

Gardenia florida,

" "

* Gardenia radicana,

" "

Spiraea prunifolia,

Feb. and March.

Deutzia gracilis,

" "

" scabra,

" "

Eupatorium elegans,

Dec. and Jan.

Sparmannia Africans,

Dec. to Feb.

PINK AND PURPLISH.

* Begonia incarnata,

Dec. to March.

Ribes sanguinea,

Feb. and March.

Weigela rosea,

" "

Fuchsia serratifolia,

Jan. to March.

Correa speciosissima,

" «(

Name

Time of Flowering.

Cyclamen coum,

Dec to Feb.

Epacris impressa,

" "

* Habrothamnus elegans,

Oct. to March.

* Plumbago rosea,

Feb. and March.

Polygala oppositifolia,

Jan. to March.

" myrtifolia,

" "

Primula sinensis, d'ble purple

, Sept to Deo.

BLUB AND LILAC.

* Heliotropium Voltairaneum

, Sept. to April.

Salvia patens,

Sept to Dec

Viola arborea,

Oct to Feb.

" Neapolitans,

Dec to Feb.

* Pentas carnea,

Sept. to ApriL

Ageratum coelestinum,

Oct to Feb.

Ceanothus rigidus,

March and Ap'l.

Neirembergia gracilis,

Jan. to April.

Plumbago capensis,

Sept to ApriL

Name.

Time of Flowering.

Tropaeolum azureum,

Nov. to Feb.

Veronica Andersonii,

Sept to Dec

SCARLET AND RED.

Euphorbia jacquinaeflora,

Nov. to March.

* Poinsetta pulcherrima,

" "

Cuphea platycentra,

Sept. to March.

Bouvardia triphylla,

Sept. to Nov.

" leiantha,

Sept. to April

* Epacris grandiflora,

March and Ap'l.

Hoitzia coccinea,

Feb. to April

* Ruellia formosa,

Nov. to April

Salvia splendens,

Oct. to Feb.

* Aphelandra Ghiesbrechtii,

Dec and Feb.

* Geissomeria elegans,

" "

* Hibiscus rosa sinensis,

Sept to Feb.

Russelia junces,

Sept. to Nov.

Tropaeolum tricolorum,

Jan. to April.

All of these will do perfectly well in a green-house. Those marked *, do best kept a little warmer than the others. They are all of the easiest possible culture, and come into flower between the periods named - different modes and circumstances making a slight difference.

Having procured these plants early in the spring, we next proceed to their culture for our purposed object. The tuberous-rooted section, comprising Tropceolums and Cyclamens, will be nearly or quite out of flower, they will require but an occasional supply of water, say once or twice a week, till the leaves are decayed, when the pots containing the plants should be set on a shelf where they can be kept nearly dry till the end of August, when they may be taken out and replaced with fresh sandy loam in the same pots as before, watered sparingly until they have an abundance of foliage, then to receive an abundant supply.