When the menstrual flux has been suppressed for any considerable time, it not unfrequently happens that the blood which should have passed off by the uterus, being determined more copiously and forcibly to other parts, gives rise to hemorrhages; hence it is frequently poured out from the nose, stomach, and lungs, and other parts, in such cases. At first, however, feverish or inflammatory symptoms appear; the pulse is hard and frequent, the skin hot, and there is severe pain in the head, back, and loins. The patient besides,is much troubled with costiveness, colic pains, and dyspeptic and hysteric symptoms.

Luxurious living, coupled with an inactive life, often producesobstructed menstruation, the supply of food being greater than the wear and tear of the system, thereby bringing on a plethoric and unhealthy state. Here abstemiousness and plenty of exercise is the natural remedy. To this may be added gentle saline purgatives, (Epsom or Glauber Salts, Rochelle Salt, or Phosphate of Soda), two or three times a week.

The application of cold at the critical period may also occasion an interruption of the menstrual discharge. In this case a warm bath or two, if to be obtained, will be of service; but if the bath cannot be obtained, the lower part of the abdomen may be fomented with flannels wrung out of hot water,and she may sit over a pan or pail of hot water. She should wrap herself up warm, and take plenty of warm slops, such as gruel and tea. Should there be much pain she might have an injection of gruel with a dram of Laudanum in it.

Should poor living, close confinement within doors, or breathing an impure air have injured the patient's health, and thereby induced debility, and an obstruction of the menstrual discharge, then it will be necessary to do all in our power to improve the health and strengthen the system. The patient's diet must be good and nourishing and easy of digestion; good boiled or roast mutton, boiled poultry, fresh fish, eggs, light puddings, jellies; with a little good wine or good beer. Fresh air, gentle exercise, warm clothing; cold bathing, when the weather will allow it.

She may take the following:

Compound Mixture of Iron..................Half a Pint.

Syrup.............................................Half an Ounce.

Two tablespoonfuls three times a day.

Some people have a great dislike to Iron in every shape; therefore, if the above should not agree with the patient, she can take the following:

Tincture of Cascarilla...................One Ounce.

Tincture of Gentian.....................One Ounce.

Tincture of Calumba....................One Ounce.

Compound Tincture of Cardamoms...One Ounce. Syrup........................................One Ounce.

Two tablespoonfuls three times a day, in a glass of water.

Compound Rhubarb Pill...............One Dram.

Extract of Hop...........................One Dram.

Make 24 pills. Two to be taken every night at bedtime.

After a time, and by way of a change, she may take any of the other tonic mixtures prescribed in this work.

Women subject to, or labouring under,a suppression of the menses, should carefully avoid all exposures to wet and cold, particularly in the feet, which parts ought to be kept not only dry, but warm.