In the treatment of this disease, proper diet and regimen are of first importance. The diet is of special importance. It is necessary, however, that it should be most carefully adapted to the wants of each individual case, as nothing could be more true than the adage that "what is one man's meat is another's poison" when referring to cases of dyspepsia. The common plan of recommending some special dietary to all dyspeptics indiscriminately is a most pernicious one. We hear much of the grape cure, the beef cure, the fat cure, the cod-liver-oil cure, the milk and sundry other special diet cures, of dyspepsia, as well as the vegetarian cure. Each of these diets may be of special service to some special case, but all are totally unfitted for all cases alike. We have seen many persons become dyspeptics by the adoption of a vegetarian diet; but we have seen many more cured by exchanging a diet of fat meats, sweets, etc., for a plain diet of fruits, grains, and vegetables.

It is not an easy matter to induce individuals suffering with dyspepsia to deny the demands of appetite. In many cases, the will is weakened by long-continued disease, and the appetite is perverted, so that the patient loses self-control, and thus himself stands as the most difficult obstacle in the way of his recovery. It must be insisted, however, that the directions to be given shall be followed implicitly. In no other way can a bad dyspeptic hope for recovery. All but one or two requirements may be conformed to, but the failure in one particular may be sufficient to make all other efforts useless.

Although, as before remarked, there is no such thing as a universal diet for dyspeptics, there are certain articles of diet that must be discarded by all persons who have a weak digestion, and certain dietetic rules which must be conformed to by all. To the most important of these we will now call attention.

1. Eat slowly, masticating the food very thoroughly, even more so, if possible, than is required in health. The more time the food spends in the mouth, the less it will spend in the stomach.

2. Avoid drinking at meals; at most, take a few sips of warm drink at the close of the meal, if the food is very dry in character.

3. In general, dyspeptic stomachs manage dry food better than that containing much fluid.

4. Eat neither very hot nor cold food. The best temperature is about that of the body. Avoid exposure to cold after eating.

5. Be careful to avoid excess in eating. Eat no more than the wants of the system require. Sometimes less than is really needed must be taken when digestion is very weak. Strength depends not on what is eaten, but on what is digested.

6. Never take violent exercise of any sort, either mental or physical; either just before or just after a meal. It is not good to sleep immediately after eating, nor within four hours of a meal.

7. Never eat more than three times a day, and make the last meal very light. For many dyspeptics, two meals are better than more.

8. Never eat a morsel of any sort between meals.

9. Never eat when very tired, whether exhausted from mental or physical labor.

10. Never eat when the mind is worried or the temper ruffled, if possible to avoid doing so.

11. Eat only food that is easy of digestion, avoiding complicated and indigestible dishes, and taking but one to three kinds at a meal.

12. Most persons will be benefited by the use of oatmeal, wheat meal, or graham flour, cracked wheat, and other whole-grain preparations, though many will find it necessary to avoid vegetables, especially when fruits or meats are taken.

As it is important to all persons with weak digestion to know what articles are easy of digestion and what are not, we give here the following

Table Showing The Length Of Time Required For The Digestion Of Various Articles Of Food In The Stomach, According To The Observations Of Dr. Beaumont On The Stomach Of Alexis St. Martin.

H. .. MIN.

H. .. MIN.

Rice, boiled,

1 .. 00

Mutton, fresh, broiled,

3 .. 00

Sago, boiled,

1 .. 45

Mutton, fresh, boiled,

3 .. 00

Tapioca, boiled,

2 .. 00

Veal, fresh, broiled,

4 .. 00

Barley, boiled,

2 .. 00

Veal, fresh, fried,

4 .. 30

Milk, boiled,

2 .. 00

Fowls, domestic, boiled,

4 .. 00

Milk, raw,

2 .. 15

Fowls, domestic, roasted,

4 .. 00

Venison Steak, broiled,

1 .. 35

Ducks, domestic, roasted,

4 .. 00

Turkey, domestic, roasted,

2 .. 30

Duck, wild, roasted,

4 .. 30

Turkey, domestic, boiled,

2 .. 25

Butter, melted,

3 .. 30

Goose, roasted,

2 .. 30

Cheese, old, strong, raw,

3 .. 30

Lamb, fresh, broiled,

2 .. 30

Soup, marrow bones, boiled,.

4 .. 15

Eggs, fresh, hard boiled,

3 .. 30

Soup, beans, boiled,

3 .. 00

Eggs, fresh, soft boiled,

3 .. 00

Soup, barley, boiled,

1 .. 30

Eggs, fresh, fried,

3 .. 30

Soup, mutton, boiled,

3 .. 30

Eggs, fresh, raw,

2 .. 00

Green corn and beans, boiled,

3 .. 45

Eggs, fresh, whipped,

1 .. 30

Chicken soup, boiled,

3 .. 00

Custard, baked,

2 .. 45

Oyster soup, boiled,

3 .. 30

Codfish, cured, dry, boiled,

2 .. 00

Hash, meat and vegetables,

Trout, Salmon, fresh, boiled,

1 .. 30

warmed,

2 .. 30

Bass, striped, fresh, broiled,

3 .. 00

Beans, pod, boiled,

2 .. 30

Salmon, salted, boiled,

4 .. 00

Bread, wheaten, fresh, baked,

3 .. 30

Oysters, fresh, raw,

2 .. 55

Bread, corn, baked,

3 .. 15

Oysters, fresh, roasted,

3 .. 15

Cake, com, baked,

3 .. 00

Oysters, fresh, stewed,

3 .. 30

Dumpling, apple, boiled,

3 .. 00

Beef, fresh, lean, rare, roasted,

3 .. 00

Apples, sour and hard, raw,

2 .. 50

Beef, fresh, dry, roasted,

3 .. 30

Apples, sour and mellow, raw,

2 .. 00

Beef, steak, broiled,

3 .. 00

Apples, sweet and mellow, raw,

1 .. 30

Beef, with salt only, boiled,

2 .. 45

Parsnips, boiled,

2 .. 30

Beef, with mustard, etc., boiled,

3 .. 30

Carrot, orange, boiled,

3 .. 15

Beef, fresh, lean, fried,

4 .. 00

Beet, boiled,

3 .. 45

Beef, old, hard, salted, boiled,

4 .. 15

Turnips, flat, boiled,

3 .. 30

Pork-steak, broiled,

3 .. 15

Potatoes, Irish, boiled,

3 .. 30

Pork, fat and lean, roasted,

5 .. 15

Potatoes, Irish, baked,

2 .. 30

Pork, recently salted, fried,

4 .. 15

Cabbage, head, raw,

2 .. 30

Mutton, fresh, roasted,

3 .. 15

Cabbage, head, boiled,

4 .. 30

We would in addition offer the following as practical suggestions:

1. The flesh of wild game is usually more easy of digestion than that of domestic animals, and is less likely to be diseased.

2. Fats are injurious to dyspeptics almost without exception. If eaten at all, butter is the only form, admissible, and this should never be eaten cooked, but cold, on bread.

3. Broiling is the best mode of cooking meat.

4. "High" meat should never be eaten, as it has begun to decay.

5. Meat and vegetables do not agree well together.

6. Fruit and vegetables often disagree. Some cases must be required to discard vegetables altogether.

7. Milk does not agree well with either vegetables or fruits.

8. Milk is easier of digestion when boiled than in its natural state.

9. Warm food is easier of digestion than cold, with the exception of fermented bread, which should be eaten stale.

10. Cold meat and meat that has been "warmed over" are not easy of digestion.