This morbid condition consists in an abnormal development of the fine, short hairs. It is mast troublesome in ladies, in whom the hair of the upper lip is sometimes sufficiently developed to form a mustache. We recently met a case in which a full silken beard had grown. In Fig. 348 and 349 may be seen two most remarkable examples of hirsutes.

Fig. 348. Hirsutes or Overgrowth Of The Hair.

Fig. 348. Hirsutes or Overgrowth Of The Hair.

Fig. 349. Hirsutes On A Woman.

Fig. 349. Hirsutes On A Woman.

The Treatment of Hirsutes or Overgrowth Of The Hair

The so called depilatores sold for the relief of this condition are worthless. They do nothing more than to remove the external portion of the hair, only penetrating a short distance into the hair follicle, and hence the hairs soon grow again. Being usually composed chiefly of lime, considerable irritation is not infrequently produced, and sometimes quite severe disease of this portion of the skin. Pulling out the hairs is only temporary in its effects, although more lasting than any depilatory. The only cure is destruction of the root of the hair or its folli cla This may be accomplished by passing into the follicle a fine glover's needle and twisting it about in such a way as to excite sufficient inflammation to obliterate or close it. Sometimes a heated needle is used for the purpose. The best plan of all is to pass a current of electricity through the needle after it has been inserted into the follicle. Galvanic electricity is necessary for this purpose. The last method of treatment can be employed only by a skillful physician.