Powders

Protective or Dusting Powders are used on excoriated and irritated surfaces of the body to protect and to prevent chafing. These powders have no medicinal value, but are efficient in furnishing protection and in drying up non-purulent secretions.

The official powders used for this purpose are zinc oxide, zinc stearate, talcum, lycopodium, and boric acid. These should not be confounded with the so-called dressing powders used in surgical dressings and which possess decided antiseptic properties. Several excellent preparations are on the market, as are also a host of cheap, useless ones.

Water

Acutely inflammed skin should not be bathed, but can be cleansed with some bland thin oil, as cocoanut oil. It should be remembered that mildly irritated skins are soothed by warm Water, and irritated by cold water. Warm water is made more sedative by the addition of sodium bicarbonate, borax or bran. Water is made more stimulant to the skin by the addition of sea salt.

Oils And Fats

Oils are generally used to soothe the skin, and the most sedative is the official alkaline oil, Linimen-turn Calcis (carron oil). This preparation is mostly used as the first application to burns.

Other sedative oils or fats are olive oil, purified petroleum oils, lard, and wool fat (Adeps Lanae, lanolin). Several official ointments are used as sedatives, such as Unguentum Acidi Borici, Unguentum Aquae Rosae, Unguen-tum Zinci Oxidi, and Unguentum Zinci Stearatis. There are also on the market several very elegant soothing solid and semi-solid preparations.

The following are two much-used ointments:

Lassar's.

Sedative.

Oils And Fats 39

gm. c. c.

Zinci Oxidi .............................................

10.

Amyli .............................................

10.

Petrolati ......................................

20.