Characters. - In colourless transparent crystals exhibiting triangular facets.

Solubility. - It is soluble in water, and less so in proof spirit.

Reactions. - It decrepitates and blackens upon the application of heat (tartrate). Its solution in water gives with hydrochloric acid a white precipitate, soluble in excess, and which is not formed if tartaric acid be previously added.

Preparation. - By boiling acid tartrate of potassium and oxide of antimony together, 2KHC4H4O6 + Sb2O3 = 2K(SbO)C4H4O6 + H2O.

Dose. - As a diaphoretic 1/16th to 1/6th3 of a grain; as an emetic, 1 to 2 grains. Of the wine as a diaphoretic, 10 to 40 min.; as an emetic for children, 1/2 to 1 fl. dr. repeated frequently.

Preparations

B.P.

Strength.

Dose.

Unguentum Antimonii Tartarati.

(with simple ointment.)

1 part in 5 ................................

Vinum Antimoniale. Antimonial Wine................................

2 gr. in 1 fl. oz. of sherry............

5 min.-l fl. dr.

U.S.P.

Strength.

Dose.

Syrupus Scillae Compositus ..........................

5 min.-l fl. dr.

Vinus Antimonii. Wine of Antimony

4 parts in 60 of water and stronger white wine up to 1,000.

Use. - This preparation of antimony is readily soluble, and as the proportion of the dose administered which actually takes effect is more constant than that of the other preparations of antimony, it has gradually displaced them. For its uses vide p. 725.

Tartar emetic ointment has been used as a counter-irritant in cases of neuralgia, paralysis of children, enlarged joints, acute meningitis, laryngitis, acute bronchitis, whooping-cough, phthisis, asthma, angina pectoris, and subacute ovaritis. For many of these purposes the application of iodine preparations is now preferred.