Potassa Cum Calce. See Potassium, P. 122.

Action of Lime

External

Slaked lime is caustic. Lime water is astringent.

Internal

Alimentary tract. - Lime is antacid. It prevents milk from forming solid, bulky curds in the stomach. It allays vomiting, and is an antidote for poisoning by mineral acids, oxalic acid, and zinc chloride. It acts as a mild intestinal astringent.

Therapeutics of Lime

External

Slaked lime, employed as a caustic, is usually mixed with caustic potash, when it forms Vienna paste (see p. 123), or with caustic soda known as London paste and is used to destroy warts and other small growths. Lime water applied to weeping eczema is especially serviceable if mixed with glycerin. Linimentum Calcis is very valuable for burns.

Internal

Lime water is much used to mix with milk to prevent its forming thick curds in the stomach, especially when, as is often the case with children, the curds cause vomiting. It is difficult to understand how it acts, for, although lime water contains so little lime, it is often efficacious. In severe cases of infantile vomiting equal parts of milk and lime water may be ordered. Lime water will check slight diarrhoea. It is a useful injection for thread-worms, for leucorrhoea, and for gleet.