The first symptoms of this form of disease are-- general debility, loss of appetite, more or less distress at the pit of the stomach, obstructed perspiration, restlessness and languor, aching in the back and limbs, and increased sensibility to cold.

The cold stage, or chill.--The chill comes on with a coldness along the back, and an irresistible desire to yawn and stretch. There is a general coldness and contracted state of the skin, and a sensation down the back as from the trickling of cold water. The jaws begin to quiver or chatter, and a general shivering takes place over the whole body; which, in some instances, continues but a few minutes, and in others for several hours. The chill is succeeded by flashes of heat, which continue to increase until the fever is fully developed. Distressing vomiting often occurs at this period.

The re-action, or hot stage.--In this stage of the disease the countenance becomes flushed, and the skin dry and hot; the pulse rises and becomes full and strong; there is pain in the head, back and extremities, and not infrequently more or less delirium. The duration of the fever varies in different cases, but finally effects a crisis by a restoration of the secretions from the skin and kidneys, and thus terminating in

The sweating stage, or crisis.--As perspiration takes place, the breathing becomes less difficult; the pulse softens, and a general abatement of all the distressing symptoms takes place. These three stages form what is called a paroxysm of the fever, which occur every day, every other day, or once in three days, and generally about the same hour of the day--the patient remaining tolerably comfortable between the paroxysms.

Treatment

The indications of cure are to aid nature in her efforts to expel from the system morbific matter on which the disease depends. To do this, administer a full and thorough course of Thomsonian medicine, commencing an hour or two before the time at which the chill comes on. Bathe the surface with the stimulating liniment after the last steaming. Then take a teaspoon twice full of Cayenne, and as much bayberry and golden seal, and steep it in a pint of hot water, and take half a cupful once in three hours, and four of the pills No. 1, at bed time. Avoid for a short time any exposure to damp or cold air--live temperately--exercise moderately, and bathe the surface every morning in cold water if the weather be warm, or cayenne and vinegar if it be cold. If, after this process, there are any symptoms indicating a return of the disease, take another course of medicine, and repeat every day until the symptoms entirely disappear.