Convalescents who have long subsisted solely upon fluids must be careful in resuming solid diet, for the rapidity of recuperation of the digestive organs varies in different persons, and taking meats or other solid foods too soon may cause rise in temperature, rapid heart action, and possibly visceral congestion. The first meat given, therefore, should be in a finely subdivided state, such as scraped beef or minced chicken.

During convalescence from protracted fevers the more easily digested forms of starchy foods are found to be very useful, especially if there has been much loss of weight. Sago and tapioca thoroughly cooked and served with cream are highly nutritious, and dried bread crumbs rolled through a fine sieve may be added to thicken clear meat broths. Crackers and zwieback are useful.

Other ingredients which may be added to thicken soups during convalescence are panada, semolina, tapioca, and macaroni. Custard puddings, cooked fruit, wine and beef jellies, blancmange, or baked custard may be allowed. " Mush," fine hominy, cornstarch, farina, and boiled rice, with beef juice, can be ordered.

The following dietary will serve as a general guide for feeding convalescents from fevers of ordinary severity in which special lesions of the alimentary canal are not present. It is taken from a Handbook of Invalid Cooking:

First Day

Breakfast

Poached egg on toast. Cocoa.

Lunch

Milk punch.

Dinner

Raw oysters. Cream crackers. Light wine if desired.

Lunch

One cup of hot beef broth.

Supper

Milk toast. Wine jelly. Tea.

Second Day

Breakfast

Soft-cooked egg. Milk punch. Coffee with sugar and cream.

Lunch

One cup of soft custard.

Dinner

Cream-of-celery soup. Sippets of toast. A little barley pudding, with cream. Sherry wine if desired.

Lunch

Milk punch.

Supper

Water toast, buttered. Wine jelly. Tea.

Third Day

Breakfast

Scrambled egg. Cream toast. Cocoa.

Lunch

One cup of hot chicken broth.

Dinner

Chicken panada. Bread. Light wine if desired. A little tapioca cream.

Lunch

An eggnog.

Supper

Buttered dry toast. Baked sweet apples and cream. Tea.

Fourth Day

Breakfast

An orange. Oatmeal (H. O.), with cream and sugar. Poached egg on toast. Baked potato. Cocoa.

Lunch

One cup of hot soft custard.

Dinner

Potato soup. Croutons. A small piece of beefsteak. Creamed potatoes. Baked custard. Coffee.

Lunch

One cup of chicken broth, with rice.

Supper

Raw oysters. Banquet crackers. Graham bread, toasted. Wine jelly. Tea.

Fifth Day

Breakfast

An orange. Coffee. Oatmeal, with cream and sugar. Broiled mutton crop. Toast.

Lunch

One cup of mulled wine.

Dinner

Chicken soup. Bread. Creamed sweetbreads. Duchess potato. Snow pudding. Cocoa.

Lunch

Siphon soda, with coffee sirup and cream.

Supper

Buttered dry toast. Orange jelly. Sponge cake and cream. Tea".

A further discussion of this topic will be found in the section upon Convalescence in Typhoid Fever.

While brandy and whisky constitute the best form in which to give alcohol in the acute stage of fevers, in convalescence it is often advisable to use some other alcoholic drink, and an occasional change from one variety to another renders the patient somewhat less liable to the danger of acquiring a permanent alcoholic habit. For convalescence, if the patient's purse can afford it, champagne, port wine, sherry, Madeira, or a good claret or Burgundy, may be taken with advantage in the class of cases above mentioned.