Dear Madam.:

In the study of the lessons on Food and Dietetics, full use should be made of the many interesting and valuable publications of the United States Department of Agriculture These are divided into the popular bulletins and pamphlets sent free to all in the United States and the more technical bulletins for which a nominal price is charged.

The free publications are included chiefly in the series of Farmers' Bulletins and in Extracts from Year Books, etc. The "for sale" bulletins are issued by the various divisions of! the Department of Agriculture, those on food chiefly by the Office of Experiment Stations and the Division of Chemistry.

Any or all of the free publications nay be obtained simply by addressing the Department of Agriculture, Washington, D. C. For the "for sale" bulletins coin or money order must be sent to the Superintendent of Documents, Washington, D. C. Postage stamps are not accepted.

The full list of free and "for sale" publications will be sent on request by the Department of Agriculture. A fairly complete list of the publications on food is given in the bibliography, but new bulletins are constantly being published. Their numbers, titles and contents are given in the monthly list or new publications which is sent free on request.

Bulletins of the various state agricultural experiment stations cannot be obtained from the U. S. Department of Agriculture, but summaries are given of the more important of these in the series of Farmers' Bulletins called Experiment Station Work, the contents of which are given in the list of free publications.

Of the "for sale" bulletins, two of the Office of Experiment Stations at least should be sent for - No. 28, American Food Materials, which gives the composition of all ordinary foods, price 6 cents, and No. 129, Dietary Studies in Boston, Springfield, Philadelphia and Chicago, price 10 cents,- interesting in connection with the cost of food. Farmers' Bulletin No. 142, The Nutritive and Economic Value of Food, should be read in connection with Part I.

The food problem is a large one and although nutrition by no means depends entirely upon the composition of the food eaten, knowledge of the character and composition of food is fundamental in the selection of a healthful diet. In the last analysis,the food problem must always be an individual one based on conditions and personal peculiarities.

If difficulties or questions arise in connection with this series of lessons, remember that you are always privileged to write to the School for assistance and advice.

Sincerely yours,

Introduction 4

Director.

January 1, 1907.

GENERAL VIEW OF THE RESPIRATION CALORIMETER, MIDDLETOWN, CONN.

GENERAL VIEW OF THE RESPIRATION CALORIMETER, MIDDLETOWN, CONN. From Year Book U. S. Department of Agriculture. 1004