Where fruit juices are to be used for the sick, make them fresh each day. Keep the fruit in a cold place, mash and squeeze it as wanted.

The following table gives the average composition of a few of our common fruits (after Bauer - Yeo):

Apple

Pear

Peach

Grape

Strawberry

Currants

Orange (pulp only)

Water............

83.58

83.03

80.03

78.18

87.66

84.77

89.01

Nitrogenous Mat.

ters..........

0.39

0.36

0.651

0.59

1.07

0.51

o.73

Free Acids.........

0.84

0.20

0.92

0.79

o.93

2.15

2.44

Sugar.........

7.73

8.26

4.48

14.36

6.28

6.38

4.59

Other non.Nitrogenous Matters..

5.17

3.54

7.17

1.96

0.48

0.90

0.95

Cellulose and Ker.

nel.........

1.98

4.30

6.06

3.6o

2.32

4.57

1.79

Ash ..............

0.31

0.31

0.69

o.53

0.81

0.72

0.49

The following gives the composition of certain dried fruits:

Apple

Cherry

Raisin

Fig

Water ........................

27.95

49.88

32.02

31.20

Nitrogenous Matters...........

1.28

2.07

2.42

4.01

Fat ...........................

0.82

0.30

0.49

1.44

Free Acid..............

3.60

-

-

1.21

Sugar................

42.83

31.22

54.26

49.79

Other non.Nitrogenous Matters.

17.0

14.29

748

4.51

Cellulose and Seeds..............

4.95

0.61

1.72

4.98

Ash ...........................

1.57

1.63

1.21

2.86

The above tables show that the nutritive value of fruits consists of a small amount of nitrogenous matter, and a goodly quantity of sugar. They are valuable, however, for the vegetable acids and salts they contain. Malic acid is found in apples, pears, peaches, apricots, currants, mangoes, gooseberries and plums; tartaric acid in grapes; and citric acid in all the citrus fruits; they possess valuable antiscorbutic properties. Some fruits contain agreeable aromatic oils, others contain a large amount of pectin or vegetable jelly; the most important among the latter, are the guava, quince, banana, crab apple and the ordinary apple.