Diacatholicon

(From Diacatholicon 2703 and universal). See Catholicon.

Diaceltatlsson

A name given by Van Helmont to a purging preparation of antimony. It seems to mean, in Paracelsus, a vomit excited by quicksilver. Sometimes this word signifies quicksilver dissolved in alcahest.

Diacenos

(From Diacenos 2705 and empty,void). An epithet of porous bodies, as sponge, or pumice stone.

Diacentaurion

(From Diacentaurion 2707 and centaureum). See Chamaedrys.

Diacenteton

(From Diacenteton 2709 and pungo, to prick). The name of a stimulating collyrium in Celsus. Diachalasis, (from to relax). A relaxation of the sutures of the cranium.

Diachalcitis

(From Diachalcitis 2712 and chalcitis). The name of a plaster whose basis is the cal-citis.

Diacheirismos

(From Diacheirismos 2714 and a hand,) is any manual operation.

Diachelidonium

(From Diachelidonium 2716 and celadine,) a swallow. A preparation of swallows. Diacheton. See Aspalathus. Diachorema, and Diachoresis. The different excretions from the body; but more properly and frequently those from the intestines. See Distri-butio.

Diachrista

(From Diachrista 2718 and to anoint).

Medicines applied to the fauces, palate, uvula, and tongue, to absterge phlegm, and discharge the mucus. P. AEgineta.

Diachrysu

(From Diachrysu 2720 and gold). The name of a plaster mentioned by Galen, used when limbs were fractured.

Diachylon

(From Diachylon 2722 ex, and a juice).

An emollient digestive plaster made of vegetable juices. The name is given to very different compositions for plasters, and is now the emplastrum lithargyri of the London Dispensatory. See Emtlastrum Commune.

Diachysis

(From Diachysis 2724 and to fuse, or melt).

See Fusio.