Enteromphalos

(From Enteromphalos 3433 and the navel). A rupture of the intestine at the navel. This seldom happens to women in labour, or from labour; but it often occurs in those debilitated by numerous births; to women who are fat and indolent.

Enteron

(From Enteron 3435 within). Internal and intestine. In Hippocrates Epid. 6. 4. ap. 3. ente-ron signifies simply the colon. 4I2

Enterophytum

(From Enterophytum 3437 and a plant). The sea chitterling, which grows in the shape of a plant.

Enteroraphe

(From Enteroraphe 3439 and a suture). A suture of the intestines. It is performed with the glover's stitch, and the end of the thread must be left beyond the external wound, to connect both, in order to form an adhesion, or an artificial anus.

Enteroscheocele

(From Enteroscheocele 3441the scrotum, and a hernia). See Hernia scrotalis.

Enthemata

(From Enthemata 3444 to put in). Medicines applied immediately to recent wounds, in order to prevent an inflammation, or stop a haemorrhage.

Enthetos

(From Enthetos 3445 to put in). Any thing introduced, but particularly lint introduced into the nose to stop a haemorrhage.

Enthlasis

(From Enthlasis 3446 to press upon,) illisio; a contusion, with the impression of the instrument by which it happened.

Enthusiasmus

(From Enthusiasmus 3447 to rave). An heated imagination, when a person deeply contemplating religious subjects loses his reason, and sees strange sights, or hears the noise of musical instruments.

Entrichoma

(From Entrichoma 3448 and the hair).

The edge of the eye lid on which the hairs grow.

Entrimma

(From Entrimma 3450 and to grate, or triturate). See Intritum.

Entrochus

(From Entrochus 3452 and a wheel). An oblong stone nearly as thick as the finger, from one to two inches long; bluish, composed of joints frequently found in clay pits. Sometimes the joints are found separate, and are called trochitae. It is a part of the arm of a petrified star fish, or a similar sea animal. It is always hardened with sparry matter, and, like it, is supposed to be diuretic. A trochite, when found separate, is nearly an inch in diameter, with a hole in the centre; varying in thickness; when broken, it is glossy and shining.