Epineneucos

(From Epineneucos 3565 and to nod or incline,) an epithet of a pulse which beats unequally in different parts of the artery; also called perineneucos. Galen thinks it common in hectics.

Epinephelos

(From Epinephelos 3567 and a cloud).

Cloudy. An epithet applied to the enaeorema in the urine, which appears like a cloud.

Epinotion

(From Epinotion 3569 and the back). The

Shoulder Blade

See Scapula.

Epios

Mild, gentle. An epithet which Hippocrates bestows on mild epidemic fevers.

Epipacits

(From Epipacits 3573 to coagulate; because it coagulates milk). Dioscorides mentions this plant, and Boerhaave thinks it the helleborine latifolia mon-tana of C. Bauhina. Serapias helleborine Lin. Sp. Pi. 1344.

Epiparoxysmus

(From Epiparoxysmus 3574 and

Paroxysm,) when the patient suffers more exacerbations than usual in a fever.

Epipasma

See Cataplasma.

Epipaston

(From Epipaston 3576 and to sprinkle).

See Catapasma.

Epipechys

(From Epipechys 3578 and the cubit,) the part of the arm above the cubit.

Epipephycos

(From Epipephycos 3580 and to grow). See

Adnata.

Epiphaenomena

(From Epiphaenomena 3582 and a phenomenon or symptom,) adventitious symptoms which do not appear till the disease is formed: the same probably as epiginomena.

Epiitilebos

(From Epiitilebos 3584 and a vein). One whose veins are prominent.

Epiphlogisma

(From Epiphlogisma 3586 and to inflame). A violent inflammation, attended with pain, tumour, and redness; or internally a burning heat. The shingles of Hippocrates. See Erysipelas

Epiphyllospermus

(From Epiphyllospermus 3589 upon, a leaf, and seed). Plants whose seeds grow on the back of their leaves.