Figures 362 to 365 illustrate the writer's latest improvement in basins to which he has given the name "Securitas," for the reason that it provides, in the simplest manner, absolute sanitary security against contamination of the clean water by any concealed or inaccessible parts, and at the same time by virtue of having no projections, recesses, irregularities or roughnesses in any part of its contour, it provides entire security against inconvenience or mechanical injury in use.

The Securitas Basin 376

Fig. 362.

The Securitas Basin 377

Fig. 363.

The peculiarly simple working parts being constructed almost entirely of white enameled iron there is nothing to require refinishing and nothing of intrinsic value to tempt the honesty of thieves or vandals in public places. Therefore virtue is promoted as well as comfort and art.

The shining white surface of the operating mechanism harmonizes with the color and texture of the fixture itself and presents with it a very attractive appearance. When the same white enamel is used also in the trap as shown in Fig. 365 the effect is still more striking and attractive. The whole outfit has then always, after any length of usage, the same perfectly clean and bright appearance as it had the day it was first installed.

The Securitas Basin 378

Fig. 364.

Figs. 364, 365 and 366 give perspective views of the device, and Figs. 362 and 363 sections showing details of its Waste Outlet Mechanism. The movable standpipe overflow and its niche are done away with, and a single overflow and outlet passage, easily accessible and convenient for cleansing without presenting any fouling surface to the clean water, takes its place.

The interior of the basin is entirely unobstructed, no brasswork or projection of any kind being in the way of the user.

The valve stem, also of enameled iron, is made adjustable as shown, and is operated by a simple enameled iron lifting device sufficiently explained by the drawings. The handle consists of a small sphere connected by a yoke with a lever within a larger sphere, and the lever directly actuates the valve in the manner shown. The weight of the handle and its leverage aid the weight of the valve and its stem in forcing the soft valve packing tightly against its sect. When open the handle stands at the dead point directly above its pivot in line with the valve so that the valve cannot accidentally close, and yet a touch in the right direction is all that is necessary to cause it to close automatically and noiselessly. The form immediately suggests the correct method of operation, so that a course of lessons in handling is not required.

The Securitas Basin 379

Fig. 365.

Fig. 365a.  Securitas Wash Basin and White Enameled Trap. Rearranged from Catalog by Courtesy of Federal Huber Co., N. Y.

Fig. 365a. "Securitas" Wash Basin and White Enameled Trap. Rearranged from Catalog by Courtesy of Federal-Huber Co., N. Y.

The valve packing consists of a simple soft rubber ring sprung around the valve in a groove provided for it. The whole mechanism provides the maximum of strength and convenience with the minimum of expense and complication.

The operating mechanism is easily removed for cleansing the outlet chamber by simply lifting it up against the slight pressure of the four small springs in their slots. It is replaced by a corresponding reversed pressure. The springs are strong enough to prevent all rattle in use, but afford but very feeble resistance to removal, a slight side pressure removing two of the springs at a time. This method of removal might be too easy were the parts constructed of brass or other metal of intrinsic value for the reason already given.

But with enameled iron having no selling or pawning value, there is no object in requiring a complicated or inconvenient method of taking apart. Hence the economy of the device provides a special feature of convenience to the user beyond its usual advantage to the pocket.

The valve is guided to its seat by the two small sidehorns cast on its outer rim engaging in corresponding side grooves molded in the pottery as shown.

In virtue of this arrangement the valve cannot possibly be inserted in any other than its right place, and the whole device becomes automatic and fool proof. The stem having been once adjusted by the manufacturer or plumber to the depth of the basin, there is nothing further to be done by anybody, no screws, or nuts to be removed or replaced in usage or cleaning, no rods or levers to be manipulated, and no standpipe, stopper, chain, or other obstruction to try the user's patience. The overflow passage is made large enough to admit the hand for easy and thorough cleaning. Thus all the requirements mentioned as necessary to produce our ideal basin seem herein to be fulfilled.

Fig.365 b.

Fig. 365c.

Fig. 365c.

Fig.365 d.

Fig.365 d.

Fig. 365 e.

Fig. 365 e.

Fig. 365 f

Fig. 365 f

Fig 365 g.

Fig 365 g.

The Securitas Basin 386