The subject of residence plumbing is one of the important branches of plumbing construction, quite different in many respects from such lines of work as the plumbing for public buildings, factories, etc., and indeed more or less different in many of its details, from the plumbing of apartment buildings.

The residence bath room especially, is a distinct feature in plumbing construction, upon which almost any amount of expense may be lavished, and in the appointments of which much taste may be displayed.

Fig. 183.   Connections for Bath Room. Separate Entrance into Stack for

Fig. 183. - Connections for Bath Room. Separate Entrance into Stack for.

Each Fixture.

In Fig. 183 is shown an arrangement for the waste connections of the bath room, which is a good one, inasmuch as it provides a separate waste entrance into the stack for each of the fixtures.

In addition to the three ordinary bath-room fixtures, there are several others which may often be found in the more extensive residences.

Among these are the sitz bath and foot bath, illustrations of which are given in Figs. 184 and 185. Their connections are very similar to those of the bath tub.

The child's pedestal bath, and the bidet are fixtures now used to some extent in residence bath rooms.

A fixture which adds much to the comforts of the bath room, is the shower bath. While the public shower bath is generally quite a costly and complicated affair, the residence shower bath commonly used, is simple and easy to install.

Fig. 184.   Connections for Sitz Bath.

Fig. 184. - Connections for Sitz Bath.

Fig. 185.   Connections for Foot Bath.

Fig. 185. - Connections for Foot Bath.

The connections for the fixture, which is known as a receptor, are shown in Fig. 186.

The slop sink, the connections for which appear in Fig. 187, and the pantry sink, as shown in Fig. 188, are necessary to the complete equipment of the modern residence.

A method of connecting laundry tubs is shown in Fig. 189, the only objection to this method being the fact that with the trap at the end of the line of tubs, it leaves a considerable length of exposed waste, to throw out odors through the waste openings of the several tubs. The laundry tubs are sometimes located in the kitchen, particularly in the case of flats and apartment houses, in which case the connections of Fig. 190 are good.

This allows both kitchen sink and laundry tubs to secure separate waste entrance into the drainage system.

Fig. 186.   Connections for Shower Bath.

Fig. 186. - Connections for Shower Bath.

These two fixtures should never be connected into one trap, a practice which is often followed, but which is to be condemned under all conditions.

The connection of the refrigerator is also an important matter, inasmuch as the contamination of food through unsanitary connections is necessarily a source of great danger to the health of the inmates.

Fig. 187.   Connections for Slop Sink.

Fig. 187. - Connections for Slop Sink.

Fig. 188.   Connections for Pantry Sink.

Fig. 188. - Connections for Pantry Sink.

Fig. 191 shows an entirely wrong method of connection for the refrigerator, but nevertheless, this and other similarly unsanitary connections are often made.

Fig. 189.   Connections for Laundry Tubs.

Fig. 189. - Connections for Laundry Tubs.

The proper method may be seen in Fig. 192. The drip pan should be trapped, and dripped into a drip sink which should be connected to the drainage system in the same manner as any other plumbing fixture. Under these conditions the refrigerator is not only protected by two traps, but there are two breaks between the drainage system and the refrigerator, one between the two traps, and another between the refrigerator and its drip pan. It is advisable to have the refrigerator trap drip into the sink in the manner shown, rather than to have the openings of the two traps in line with each other vertically.

Fig. 190.   Connections for Kitchen Sink and Laundry Tubs.

Fig. 190. - Connections for Kitchen Sink and Laundry Tubs.

Fig. 191.   Wrong Connections for Refrigerator.

Fig. 191. - Wrong Connections for Refrigerator.

Fig. 192.   Proper Refrigerator Connections.

Fig. 192. - Proper Refrigerator Connections.

Fig. 193.   Plumbing for Residence in Readiness to Receive the Water Test.

Fig. 193. - Plumbing for Residence in Readiness to Receive the Water Test.

Fig. 194.   Plumbing System for Residence, Showing the Work of Fig. 193 Completed.

Fig. 194. - Plumbing System for Residence, Showing the Work of Fig. 193 Completed.

With these connections and intelligent use and precaution, there should be no reason why the refrigerator should not waste into the drainage system with as much safety as any other fixture.

The foregoing gives an idea of the details of connections for the different fixtures commonly found in residences.

In Fig. 193 is shown an elevation of the complete plumbing system for a residence, after the roughing has been completed, and the work is ready to receive the water test. This system is constructed according to the practice which is generally followed in most sections of the country. It is capable of improvement, however, by the application of continuous venting in place of the crown venting shown. The same system after it has reached completion, with all fixtures in position, is seen in Fig. 194.