In Fig. 204 an end view of a double line of these sinks is given, and in Fig. 205 a top or plan view of the double line.

From the latter, it will be seen that the battery is made up of separate sinks, which are so made that they may be butted up to each other, enabling the installing of batteries of any desired length.

Such sinks are often placed at the center of the wash room, in which position the venting of the many traps and the running of the main vent would often be a difficult and awkward matter. Therefore, in those cities where it is allowable to use nonsiphonable traps without vents, the connections shown in Figs. 203 and 204 may be used to great advantage. This gives each fixture a separate waste entrance and a cleanout, with a cleanout at the end of the line of main waste pipe. Above the line of sinks, as shown, a line of supply is run, with outlets for each fixture, which are supported on the fixture itself. This line of supply answers also for holding towels, etc.

Fig. 204.   End View of Double Line of Wash Sinks.

Fig. 204. - End View of Double Line of Wash Sinks.

Fig. 205.   Plan View of Double Line of Wash Sinks.

Fig. 205. - Plan View of Double Line of Wash Sinks.

Fig. 206.   Factory Wash Sink.

Fig. 206. - Factory Wash Sink.

If there is no difficulty in running vents, the continuous-vent principle may be employed on these fixtures. To carry this out, the work should be installed as in Figs. 203 and 204, but half-S traps used instead of other styles.

Another excellent form of factory wash sink is that shown in elevation in Fig. 206 and in plan in Fig. 207.

The sink is made in sections, generally of slate, and may be installed in any length by using a sufficient number of sections.

Fig. 207.   Plan View of Factory Wash Sink.

Fig. 207. - Plan View of Factory Wash Sink.

The novel feature of this sink is its center compartment. Into this falls the water from the spray pipe which runs above the center of the sink. From the center compartment the water constantly overflows into the main body of the sink. This arrangement keeps the inner compartment always filled with clear water for washing the face, a great objection in most factory sinks being the absence of any such convenience. A standing overflow is provided for each sink section.

Fig. 208.   Sectional Wash Sink.

Fig. 208. - Sectional Wash Sink.

Another form of sectional sink is shown in Figs. 208 and 209. It is of cast iron, and the sections are bolted together to give any required length of sink.

The supply is carried through the length of the sink, and directly over its center, with a bibb taken out at intervals. The supply pipe is supported on brackets which are bolted to the sink, each bracket being supplied with a soap dish.

Fig. 209.   End View of Sectional Wash Sink.

Fig. 209. - End View of Sectional Wash Sink.

The matter of drinking fountains is of importance in school work and in other public buildings.

Connections for the common form of drinking fountain are given in Fig. 210, concerning which there is no special novelty. Over this form of fountain, which necessitates the use of the same drinking cup by all that use the fixture, there has been great improvement in recent years.

The improved drinking fountain is shown in two forms in Figs. 211 and 212.

In these fixtures, the supply is connected directly to one or more bubbling cups.

Fig. 210.   Common Form of Drinking Fountain.

Fig. 210. - Common Form of Drinking Fountain.

Fig. 211.   A Sanitary Pedestal Drinking Fountain.

Fig. 211. - A Sanitary Pedestal Drinking Fountain.

By pressing down on the rim of the cup, the water is made to spurt or bubble up to any desirable height, according to the adjustment. This enables the water to be drunk without the use of a drinking cup, which is naturally a very much more sanitary method.

Such fountains as these are extensively used for all public purposes, both indoors and out of doors.

In public toilet-room work, it is often required to operate water-closet flush tanks automatically. A" very good method is one adopted by several of the best manufacturers, in operating the flush by means of levers attached to the seat in such a manner that when it is released these levers trip the flush valve in the tank. Another method is similar, but operated by the opening of the door to the water-closet compartment.

Fig. 212.   A Sanitary Drinking Fountain.

Fig. 212. - A Sanitary Drinking Fountain.

Flushing valves have in the last few years been rapidly coming into use on public work, thereby doing away entirely with flush tanks. In many cases the best method of handling public water-closets and urinals is by means of an automatic flushing system, which thoroughly flushes these fixtures at intervals of a few moments. The great objection to this course is the fact that foul matter entering the water-closets and urinals must often have to remain several minutes before it is flushed out. Therefore, on such work it is wise to have a very strong system of ventilation.

Fig. 213.   Connections for Line of Refrigerators on Different Floors.

Fig. 213. - Connections for Line of Refrigerators on Different Floors.