Figure 98 is the tail-stock used on 20-inch swing lathes built by P. Blaisdell & Company. The only noticeable feature is the unusual diameter of the tail-spindle sleeve in proportion to its supporting parts. The cap at the rear end is of such form and dimensions as to increase this top-heavy appearance.

The Hendey-Norton tail-stock for 20-inch swing lathes is shown in Fig. 99. It is a clean, symmetrical, and well-designed piece of work and a considerable improvement on the one just before it. It is secured to the bed by a lever and eccentric arrangement similar to that shown in Fig. 94.

Figure 100 shows the New Haven Manufacturing Company's tail-stock for 24-inch swing lathes. A finished sleeve screwed into the rear of the main casting furnishes the support for the tail-spindle screw and adds to the otherwise clean outline and substantial appearance of the base. It is very rigid and substantial.

Figure 101 shows the Prentice Bros. Company's tail-stock, which they claim as their invention so far as American lathes are concerned. Other than this fact there is nothing particularly noticeable in its design except that there are two ribs and grooves, one to each bolt for preventing the undue strain on the holding-down bolts. These bolts are well spread apart, which is a good feature in some respects if not in others.

Fig. 98.   20 inch Lathe Tail Stock, built by P. Blaisdell & Company.

Fig. 98. - 20-inch Lathe Tail-Stock, built by P. Blaisdell & Company.

Fig. 99.   20 inch Lathe Tail Stock, built by the Hendey Machine Company.

Fig. 99. - 20-inch Lathe Tail-Stock, built by the Hendey Machine Company.

Fig. 100.   24 inch Lathe Tail Stock, built by the New Haven Manufacturing Company.

Fig. 100. - 24-inch Lathe Tail-Stock, built by the New Haven Manufacturing Company.

The Schumacher & Boye tail-stock shown in Fig. 102 is a good general design and resembles that of the Hendey-Norton manufacture. Aside from the very prominent cap at the rear end it is a very creditable appearing device, and considerably better than some of those short and square forms which appear "all in a bunch," as it were.

Fig. 101.  22 inch Lathe Tail Stock, built by the Prentice Bros. Company.

Fig. 101. -22-inch Lathe Tail-Stock, built by the Prentice Bros. Company.

Fig. 102.   18 inch Lathe Tail Stock, built by Schumacher & Boye.

Fig. 102. - 18-inch Lathe Tail-Stock, built by Schumacher & Boye.

Figure 103 shows the W. P. Davis machine Company's production, which is of fairly good proportions and has ample strength. While it is for only a 28-inch swing lathe, it is provided with a rack and pinion device for moving it along the bed.

The Bench lathe tail-stock is well shown in Fig. 104, the engraving being of the type made by the American Watch Tool Company.

It is chiefly noticeable for the very long spindle which it carries. This type of tail-stock does not usually have the set-over feature. It is clamped to the bed by a lever-nut turning horizontally.

Of the heavier tail-stocks, for large lathes, the Niles type is shown in Fig. 105. This is divided near the bottom, as in the usual design for small lathes, and secured to the bed by four bolts. It has a rack and pinion device for moving it along the bed, and otherwise is of ordinary design and construction, without special features to which attention need be called.

The tail-stock shown in Fig. 106 is of the same general form as that shown in Fig. 100, by the same concern, the New Haven Manufacturing Company. This is for a 60-inch swing lathe, and is a very massive and rigid tail center support. It has proportionately a long bearing on the bed, to which it is secured by four heavy bolts. It is divided near the top and the upper portion secured to the lower by four other bolts of ample diameter, by which means heavy work held on the centers need not be removed or blocked up when setting over for turning tapers. As the spindle sleeve is very long and the tail spindle large and heavy, a spur gear is keyed to the spindle screw and engages a spur pinion on a shaft in front. Upon the front end of this shaft is a miter gear which engages with a similar one fixed to a short transverse shaft upon whose front end is a large hand wheel by which the tail spindle is easily and conveniently operated. The ratio of this gearing is 3 to 1. The tail-stock, which is very heavy and massive, is moved along the bed by a rack and pinion device, also back-geared at a ratio of 3 to 1, by which one man may easily move the tail-stock from one point to another, although it weighs nearly a ton.

Fig. 103.  Tail Stock built by the W. P. Davis Machine Company.

Fig. 103. -Tail-Stock built by the W. P. Davis Machine Company.

Fig. 104.   Bench Lathe Tail Stock, built by American Watch Tool Company.

Fig. 104. - Bench Lathe Tail-Stock, built by American Watch-Tool Company.

Fig. 105. 42 inch Lathe Tail Stock, built by the Niles Company.

Fig. 105.-42-inch Lathe Tail-Stock, built by the Niles Company.

The establishment of Schumacher & Boye make a somewhat similar tail-stock for their 48-inch swing lathe. It is shown in Fig. 107. It is provided with the same features as the one just considered, but has the hand wheel set at an angle, with the intention, probably, of rendering its position more convenient to the operator. It is not as massive or rigid as the last one shown, but doubtless serves a good purpose.

Fig. 106.  60 inch Lathe Tail Stock, built by the New Haven Manufacturing Company.

Fig. 106. -60-inch Lathe Tail-Stock, built by the New Haven Manufacturing Company.

Fig. 107.   48 inch Lathe, built by Schumacher & Boye.

Fig. 107. - 48-inch Lathe, built by Schumacher & Boye.