books



previous page: Art And Education In Wood-Turning | by William W. Klenke
  
page up: Woodworking Books
  
next page: Bench Work In Wood | by W. F. M. Goss

Lathe Design, Construction And Operation



A complete practical work on the lathe. giving its origin and development. its design. Its various types as manufactured by different builders, including engine lathes, heavy lathes, highspeed lathes, special lathes, turret lathes, electrically driven lathes, and many others. Lathe attachments, lathe work, lathe tools, rapid change gear mechanisms, speeds and feeds, power for cutting tools, lathe testing, turning tapers, methods of milling and grinding in the lathe, thread cutting, lathe installation, etc.

TitleLathe Design, Construction And Operation, With Practical Examples Of The Lathe Work
AuthorOscar E. Perrigo
PublisherThe Norman W. Henley Publishing Co.
Year1916
Copyright1916, The Norman W. Henley Publishing Co.
AmazonLathe Design: Construction And Operation

Lathe Design, Construction And Operation

With Practical Examples Of Lathe Work

By Oscar E. Perrigo, M.E. Author of "Modern Machine Shop Construction, Equipment and Management," "Change Gear Devices," etc., etc.

New Revised And Enlarged Edition

Illustrated by Three Hundered and Forty-one Engrayings Made from Drawings Expressly Executed for this Book

New York The Norman W. Henley Publishing Co.

2 West 45th Street 1919

Copyright, 1916 and 1907, By The Norman W. Henley Publishing Co.

Note. - Each and every illustration in this book was specially made for it, and is fully covered by copyright.

Composition, Printing And Binding By The Plimpton Press, Norwood, Mass., U.S.A.

-Preface
The aim of the Author in writing this book has been to present in as comprehensive a manner as may be within the limits of a single volume the history and development of the lathe from early times to ...
-Introduction
In the great measure of success that has been enjoyed, and the vast volume of wealth that has been produced in this, the most industrial of all countries, the manufacturing industries easily lead all ...
-Introduction. Continued
The lack of facilities for making iron castings was very early felt, and history tells us that as early as the year 1643 John Winthrop arrived in this country from England, bringing with him the neces...
-Chapter I. History Of The Lathe Up To The Introduction Of Screw Threads
Tracing early history. The lathe was the first machine tool. The origin of the lathe. An old definition of turning. The first record of turning operations. Another old-time definition of turning. Engl...
-History Of The Lathe. Introduction Of Screw Threads. Part 2
We read that: Wood-turners in some of the Asiatic countries go into the deep forests with axes, and with a few rude turning tools and hair ropes build their lathes and turn out objects of beauty and...
-History Of The Lathe. Introduction Of Screw Threads. Part 3
It was later found that if the flexible pole or lath was rather weak and the piece of work to be operated upon was quite heavy, acting as a balance-wheel, its forward revolution was not wholly arres...
-History Of The Lathe. Introduction Of Screw Threads. Part 4
The large wheel was of cast iron, rescued from a scrap heap, and had only the grooves for the two faster speeds K, L, the part M being made of wood and fastened to the arms of the wheel. A friendly bl...
-Chapter II. The Development Of The Lathe Since The Introduction Of Screw Threads
Origin of the screw thread. Ancient boring tools. Suggestions of the screw form. The Worm Gimlet. Making the first nuts. An old device for cutting threads in wood. Archimedes and his helical device ...
-Development Of Lathe Since Introduction Of Screw Threads. Part 2
We know that a Frenchman by the name of Jacques Berson, in 1569, built a lathe that seems to have been capable of cutting threads on wood. An engraving of his lathe is given in Fig. 9. As will be see...
-Lathe Development Since Introduction Of Screw Threads. Part 3
By the use of the device shown in Fig, 10, it is plain that a different master screw was needed for each different pitch of thread to be cut, although the diameter of the work might be anything with...
-The Lathe Development Since Introduction Of Screw Threads. Part 4
The carriage was of the roughest description and had a hand cross feed for the tool block, which carried the old-fashioned tool-clamping device held in place by studs and nuts. The longitudinal hand f...
-Lathe Development Since the Introduction Of Screw Threads. Part 5
The transition from wooden to iron beds and legs for lathes was probably made by the early builders of these machines about 1840 or a few years later. It is certain that in 1850 lathes with iron beds ...
-Chapter III. Classification Of Lathes
The essential elements of a lathe. The bed. The head-stock. The tail-stock. The carriage. The apron. The turning and supporting rests. The countershaft Taper attachments. Change-gears. Classification ...
-Classification Of Lathes. Part 2
Hand lathes are supposed to be for the usual operations of hand tool turning, filing and light metal turning by means of a detachable slide-rest. They may have legs of sufficient height to support the...
-Classification Of Lathes. Part 3
By the term roughing lathe we understand that the design is heavy and massive with a very powerful driving mechanism, lateral and cross feeds and a very rigid tool holding device. Such a lathe is se...
-Classification Of Lathes. Part 4
These being the conditions under which it is designed and built, it is an expensive lathe, as the most skilful labor is used in its construction and the time devoted to this work is always liberal. It...
-Classification Of Lathes. Part 5
Pulley lathes, as they are commonly termed, might more appropriately be called pulley-turning machines, or even pulley-making machines, since some of them make the pulley complete, with the exception ...
-Classification Of Lathes. Part 6
While the turret lathe in its perfected form is now a complete machine, the turret idea was first applied to engine lathes, and turret attachments are so universally popular that most of the lathe man...
-Chapter IV. Lathe Design: The Bed And Its Supports
The designer of lathes. The manufacturer's view of a lathe. The proper medium. Cause of failure. The visionary designer. Conscientious efforts to improve in design. Design of the lathe bed. Elementary...
-Lathe Design: The Bed And Its Supports. Part 2
With these preliminary statements relative to the conditions and requirements of good and successful designing, we may take up the designing of lathes somewhat in detail and inquire into the design of...
-Lathe Design: The Bed And Its Supports. Part 3
It was from such considerations and conditions as has just been illustrated and described that the author designed and built the 21-inch swing engine lathe shown in Fig. 33. This lathe met with except...
-Lathe Design: The Bed And Its Supports. Part 4
The bed shown in Fig. 37 is considerably deeper than the former examples, but corresponds very nearly to the proportions that have been found necessary to the proper strength and rigidity of the moder...
-Lathe Design: The Bed And Its Supports. Part 5
As still stronger and more rigid beds were called for, the braces were placed at an angle, generally crossing each other, and of the form and proportion shown in plan in Fig. 41. In this case it was u...
-Lathe Design: The Bed And Its Supports. Part 6
The form and proportions of the lathe bed having been duly considered, its different component parts illustrated and described, and these detail matters criticised and commented upon, the next part of...
-Lathe Design: The Bed And Its Supports. Part 7
In sharp contrast to these conditions is the bed shown in Fig. 48. In this case the front cabinet is of a length on the bed equal to the length of the head-stock, hence the front bearing of the head s...
-Chapter V. Lathe Design; The Head-Stock Casting, The Spindle And The Spindle Cone
Design of head-stock for wooden bed lathes. Early design for use on a cast iron bed. An old New Haven head-stock. The arch form of the bottom plate. Providing for reversing gears. The Hendey-Norton he...
-The Head-Stock Casting, The Spindle And The Spindle Cone. Part 2
In Fig. 58 is shown a modification of the arch form shown in Fig. 57, which has for its purpose the strengthening obtained by the rib A in Fig. 55, only in a better form, as the method is cored out,...
-Head-Stock Casting, The Spindle And The Spindle Cone. Part 3
This design gives great strength, and with the proper proportions and thickness of metal throughout it is as rigid as it is possible to design a head-stock. The housings are unusually thick and cored ...
-The Head-Stock Casting, Spindle And Spindle Cone. Part 4
There is one more condition to be considered, however. This is the upward or lifting tendency supposed to exist by reason of the cutting-tool forming a fulcrum, which, in connection with the circular ...
-Chapter VI. Lathe Design : The Spindle Bearings, The Back Gears, And The Triple Gear Mechanism
Designing spindle bearings and boxes. Thrust bearings. The Lodge & Shipley form. Ball bearings. Proper metal for boxes. The cast iron box. Early form of boxes. The cylindrical form. Thrust bearings fo...
-Spindle Bearings, Back Gears, Triple Gear Mechanism. Part 2
Of course it is assumed in all these remarks that the lathe spindles are made of 50 to 60-point crucible steel, and that they have been accurately ground, as this is the only method by which we can in...
-Spindle Bearings, Back Gears, Triple Gear Mechanism. Part 3
In the present case the spindle A is cylindrical, that is, with no taper, and runs in a hard bronze sleeve B, which has a taper of two degrees on each side and fits closely in the taper reamed hole in...
-Spindle Bearings, Back Gears, Triple Gear Mechanism. Part 4
In Fig. 83 is shown a similar device to the above, except that a flat linked chain is used instead of a circular ring. It is obvious that by lengthening the chain it will necessarily dip deeper into t...
-Spindle Bearings, Back Gears, Triple Gear Mechanism. Part 5
The various speeds given to the spindle cone by belt changes depend, of course, upon the porportions of the diameters of the various steps of the cone. When there are five steps on the cone, the centr...
-Spindle Bearings, Back Gears, Triple Gear Mechanism. Part 6
In this lathe a four-step cone is used, therefore giving only eight speeds. The lathe is a small one, the swing being 14 inches and intended for light work and a comparatively fast range of speeds. It...
-Spindle Bearings, Back Gears, Triple Gear Mechanism. Part 7
While it is not the intention of the author to assume to present in this work an exhaustive treatise on lathe design, for the reason that the scope of the plan is not extensive enough to permit it, an...
-Chapter VII. Lathe Design: The Tail-Stock, The Carriage, The Apron, Etc
Functions of the tail-stock. Requisites in its construction. The Pratt & Whitney tail-stock. The Reed tail-stock. The Lodge & Shipley tail-stock. The Blaisdell tail-stock. The Hendey-Norton tail-stock...
-The Tail-Stock, The Carriage, The Apron, Etc. Part 2
Figure 98 is the tail-stock used on 20-inch swing lathes built by P. Blaisdell & Company. The only noticeable feature is the unusual diameter of the tail-spindle sleeve in proportion to its supporting...
-The Tail-Stock, The Carriage, The Apron, Etc. Part 3
Figure 108 shows a design of tail-stock made by the Bridgford Machine Tool Works for their 42-inch swing lathe. It is of peculiar design and the base has the appearance of having been built up in the...
-The Tail-Stock, The Carriage, The Apron, Etc. Part 4
The carriage is gibbed to the bed on the outside of the V's, both back and front, thus spreading the gibbed surfaces as far apart as possible. Following this will come in due order illustrations of a...
-The Tail-Stock, The Carriage, The Apron, Etc. Part 5
First. - The tool block will not travel beyond the line of centers to permit holding small boring tools directly in the tool-post by means of any of the holders so often described which use V-block cl...
-The Tail-Stock, The Carriage, The Apron, Etc. Part 6
The R. K. Le Blond taper attachment is shown in Fig. 117. The slide supporting bracket A is attached to a dovetail formed upon or attached to, the bed. Upon it is swiveled the guiding bar B, upon whic...
-Chapter VIII. Lathe Design; Turning Rests, Supporting Rests, Shaft Straighteners, Etc
Holding a lathe tool. The old slide-rest. The Reed compound rest. The Lodge & Shipley compound rest. The Hamilton compound rest. The Hendey-Norton open side tool-posts. Quick-elevating tool-rest. The ...
-Turning Rests, Supporting Rests, Shaft Straighteners. Part 2
Figure 131 shows the Homan patent tool-rest, which is also made by the Hendey Machine Company, which has a screw adjustment as to height and a graduated base for setting to any required angle. It is, ...
-Turning Rests, Supporting Rests, Shaft Straighteners. Part 3
The turning of cone pulleys is usually a tedious and expensive job unless some special device is in use for the purpose. In Fig. 138 is shown such a device built by the Hendey Machine Tool Company. It...
-Turning Rests, Supporting Rests, Shaft Straighteners. Part 4
Those having quantities of shafts, with a number of shoulders to turn, will recognize in this rest an attachment entirely new in principle and of the greatest importance in the saving of time. One of...
-Turning Rests, Supporting Rests, Shaft Straighteners. Part 5
Later on friction clutches or friction pulleys were devised, and these in one form or another are largely in use at the present time. Up to a comparatively recent date the lathe had but two speeds, s...
-Turning Rests, Supporting Rests, Shaft Straighteners. Part 6
As the supply of oil is so profuse there is the liability of waste by its running out at the ends of the journals. This is prevented by providing the return oil grooves E, E, at the ends, which conduc...
-Chapter IX. Lathe Attachments
Special forms of turned work. Attachment for machining concave and convex surfaces. Attachment for forming semicircular grooves in rolling mill rolls. Device for turning balls or spherical work. Turni...
-Lathe Attachments. Part 2
Figure 152 shows a compound rest tool block arranged for forming the semicircular grooves in rolling mill rolls. In this case the tool-post M may be made in two or more sizes, as some of the grooves a...
-Lathe Attachments. Part 3
It is necessary for its practical working that all fits and adjustments must be nicely made and accurately set in order to have this attachment operative. Also, that unless the parts are all comparati...
-Lathe Attachments. Part 4
The compound rest, or cross-slide, as the case may be, is connected to the taper attachment sliding block J by a pivot bolt G, in the usual manner. The operation of the device is this. The swivel bar...
-Lathe Attachments. Part 5
In Fig. 167 is given a view of one of the electrically driven lathe grinder attachments made by the Cincinnati Electrical Tool Company. It may be held in the tool-post or tool-clamping device, and is ...
-Chapter X. Rapid Change Gear Mechanisms
What a rapid change gear device is. The old pin wheel and lantern pinion . device. The first patent for a rapid change gear device. The inventors' claims. Classification of rapid change gear devices. ...
-Rapid Change Gear Mechanisms. Part 2
For the purposes of this work it will be sufficient to present a few of the more recent examples in this chapter and to call attention to the engravings of a number of others in other chapters wherein...
-Rapid Change Gear Mechanisms. Part 3
This entire range of threads can be made without stopping the lathe or removing a single gear. The feeds are four times the number of threads per inch. It will be noticed that the compounding generall...
-Rapid Change Gear Mechanisms. Part 4
Figure 180 shows the quick change gear cut entirely out, and ordinary change-gears used. It shows also on an enlarged scale the plunger and sliding key whereby one of the three gears C may be keyed to...
-Rapid Change Gear Mechanisms. Part 5
This gives a range from 1 to 15 threads per inch and feeds from 4 to 60 per inch inclusive. By changing gear A, the other changes, of course, are readily obtained. It will be noticed that the device ...
-Chapter XI. Lathe Tools, High-Speed Steel, Speeds And Feeds, Power For Cutting-Tools, Etc
Lathe tools in general. A set of regular tools. Tool angles. Materials and their characteristics. Their relation to the proper form of tools. Behavior of metals when being machined. The four requisite...
-Lathe Tools, Speeds And Feeds, Cutting-Tools. Part 2
Of course all tools must be harder than the material they are to cut; at the same time they must not be so hard as to be brittle, or be made of a quality of steel that becomes brittle when hardened, b...
-Lathe Tools, Speeds And Feeds, Cutting-Tools. Part 3
This innovation was started before the advent of the now well-known self-hardening, or high-speed tool steels, that have so changed machine shop conditions and which followed the introduction of ...
-Lathe Tools, Speeds And Feeds, Cutting-Tools. Part 4
In reference to the use of high-speed steel in a very large and general way, for all classes of work upon which it is possible to use it, there seems to be no doubt. It has been proven many times, in ...
-Lathe Tools, Speeds And Feeds, Cutting-Tools. Part 5
When the shafts are all roughed off and finished, the foreman will find to his great astonishment that by actual time the lathe has produced over 25 to 40 per cent more work than ever before. I allud...
-Lathe Tools, Speeds And Feeds, Cutting-Tools. Part 6
The question of brittleness is largely a question of treatment; and intelligent experience will very largely obviate the difficulty so that it will be tough enough to stand up under any proper condit...
-Lathe Tools, Speeds And Feeds, Cutting-Tools. Part 7
At a speed of, say, two hundred feet per minute, the chip comes writhing and twisting, almost red hot, in a continuous length, shooting here and there, everywhere but the chip box; and quick must be ...
-Lathe Tools, Speeds And Feeds, Cutting-Tools. Part 8
As to the kind of lubricant to be used, it will vary with the kind of metal to be machined and its condition. Cast iron will require no lubricant. In fact it is probable that any kind of a lubricant w...
-Lathe Tools, Speeds And Feeds, Cutting-Tools. Part 9
It would be very interesting if we could make a table giving the power required to drive the lathe on all different diameters, for all different kinds and qualities of metal, when turned with all diff...
-Lathe Tools, Speeds And Feeds, Cutting-Tools. Part 10
Tons For soft fluid compressed steel....................... 115 For medium fluid compressed steel................... 108 For hard fluid compressed steel....
-Chapter XII. Testing A Lathe
Prime requisites of a good lathe. Importance of correct tests. The author's plan. Devices for testing alignment. Using the device. Adjustable straight-edge. Development of the plan. Special tools nece...
-Testing A Lathe. Part 2
Supposing that the centers of the lathe have been found to line vertically and horizontally correct, we now desire to know if the back box of the head spindle is set in exact prolongation of the line ...
-Testing A Lathe. Part 3
There are many items of an inspector's duty not here enumerated which, in a shop properly arranged and managed, will have been attended to as the parts are being made and assembled. This relates only ...
-Testing A Lathe. Part 4
To test the lateral alignment of the head spindle, a bar of the size of the ordinary lathe tool, with its front end bent to a right angle, and provided with a micrometer head, is placed in the compoun...
-Chapter XIII. Lathe Work
The use of hand tools. Simple lathe work. Lathe centers. Care in reaming center holes. Locating the center. Use of the center square. Angle of centers. Lubrication of centers. Centering large pieces o...
-Lathe Work. Part 2
From these examples and remarks it will be seen that much depends on making the center holes of the right form if we expect to produce a good piece of turned work. In centering large pieces of work i...
-Lathe Work. Part 3
One of the oldest chuck manufacturers was E. Horton, who established the business in 1851. One of the Horton three-jaw chucks is shown in Fig. 210. At A is shown a face view of the finished chuck. It...
-Lathe Work. Part 4
When round rods or bars are to be machined or pieces cut from them, whether to be partly machined or not, a drill chuck, so called, is used. This is a two-jaw chuck, the jaws being of a variety of for...
-Chapter XIV. Lathe Work Continued
Irregular lathe work. Clamping work to the face-plate. Danger of distorting the work. A notable instance of improper holding of face-plate work. The turning of tapers. Setting over the tail-stock cent...
-Lathe Work Continued. Part 2
While there are usually graduations on the end of the taper attachment that are intended as a guide in setting the swivel-bar or guide, they are frequently misunderstood and consequently useless. Usua...
-Lathe Work Continued. Part 3
When these conditions are obtained the forming lathe works easily, accurately, and efficiently. The tools must be so formed that by continually grinding on the top the form and contour of the cutting...
-Lathe Work Continued. Part 4
The device for doing this job, when once made, proved to be useful on other jobs as well. The author once designed and built a lathe for doing a similar job to the one here described and illustrated,...
-Lathe Work Continued. Part 5
The result of this combination is this: If the 36-gear engaged the 72, the ratio would be 2; and if the 24-gear engaged the 48, the ratio would be 2. These ratios multiplied would be 4. As they are en...
-Lathe Work Continued. Part 6
An expert blacksmith forged a twist drill 2 inches in diameter with a twist of 31 inches in length, which was turned up and finished, and with this a hole was bored a little over 30 inches deep. A sof...
-Chapter XV. Engine Lathes
Definition of the word engine. What is meant by an engine lathe. The plan of this chapter. The Reed lathes. Reed 18-inch engine lathe The Pratt & Whitney lathes. Their 14-inch engine lathe. Flather la...
-Engine Lathes. Part 2
Experience has demonstrated that with proper care on the part of the operator a box constructed in this manner will last for a very long time, and, if properly lubricated, that the babbitt metal will ...
-Engine Lathes. Part 3
The spindle cone is of five steps and adapted for a 2f-inch belt, or made of four steps for a 3 1/4-inch belt, as may be desired. The carriage is gibbed on the inside and outside and has ample bearin...
-Engine Lathes. Part 4
This company make a variety of lathes and lathe attachments and accessories, some of which are shown later on in this book, and under the appropriate heading, to which the reader's attention is direct...
-Engine Lathes. Part 5
It will be noticed in the engraving of the front of the lathe that all movements, including those of reversing, are controlled by levers in the front of the apron, so that the operator need not, neces...
-Engine Lathes. Part 6
The general arrangement and construction of the head-stock, and the gearing contained in the front end of the bed, is well shown in the longitudinal section in Fig. 237, and the end elevation in Fig. ...
-Chapter XVI. Engine Lathes Continued
Schumacher & Boye's 20-inch instantaneous change gear engine lathe. Emmes change gear device. 32-inch swing engine lathe. Le Blond engine lathes. 24-inch swing lathe. The Le Blond lathe apron. Complet...
-Engine Lathes Continued. Part 2
While this establishment makes several types of lathes, it will be sufficient for our purpose here to introduce the regular engine lathe, and that of 24-inch swing is taken as a good example and shown...
-Engine Lathes Continued. Part 3
The carriage is scraped to the full bearing of its entire length on the V's and is gibbed at both back and front to the outside of the bed. It is made deep and strong and has power lateral and cross f...
-Engine Lathes Continued. Part 4
In Fig. 250 is given an end elevation of the lathe, principally for the purpose of showing the rapid change gear device, which is of the type first patented by Edward Flather in 1895, and since used t...
-Engine Lathes Continued. Part 5
In addition to the above feature, the lathe is provided with a rotating indicator or chasing dial, located on the top of the carriage, which enables the operator to catch the thread quickly and proper...
-Chapter XVII. Heavy Lathes
The Bradford Tool Company's 42-inch swing triple-geared engine lathe. The American Tool Works Company's 42-inch swing triple-geared engine lathe. The New Haven Manufacturing Company's 50-inch swing tr...
-Heavy Lathes. Part 2
The tail-stock is of ample dimensions with a bearing 26 inches long on the bed. The tail-stock spindle is 4 1/8 inches in diameter and has a travel of 16 inches. It has the usual set-over screw for us...
-Heavy Lathes. Part 3
The feed is positive, by a series of gears on the head-stock, with the usual change-gears for operating the lead screw, which is splined for driving the apron mechanism. All sliding surfaces are hand...
-Chapter XVIII. High-Speed Lathes
Prentice Brothers Company's new high-speed, geared head lathe. A detailed description of its special features. A roughing lathe built by the R. K. Le Blond Machine Tool Company. Lodge & Shipley's pate...
-High-Speed Lathes. Part 2
The two groups of gears are of the ratio 2 to 1,1 to 1,1 to 2, and 1 to 4, which, in connection with the bank of gears mounted on the side of the head, gives a range of thread cutting from 2 to 32 per...
-High-Speed Lathes. Part 3
The manufacturer of the lathe says: Our aim in its design has been to provide this power in such a manner that all the functions of the regular type would be retained, but the head would have wearing...
-High-Speed Lathes. Part 4
The end thrust of the spindle is against the rear housing of the head-stock by means of a large cast iron collar keyed fast to the spindle, between which and the faced inside of the housing are interp...
-Chapter XIX. Special Lathes
The F. E. Reed turret-head chucking lathe. Its special features. A useful turning rest. The Springfield Machine Tool Company's shaft-turning lathe. The three-tool shafting rest. The driving mechanism,...
-Special Lathes. Part 2
On this lathe, when arranged as above, it is only necessary to remove the shafting rest, replace the compound rest, disconnect the tumbler gear under the head-stock, and the lathe is ready to perform ...
-Special Lathes. Part 3
The upper spindle is triple geared and has double the ratio of back gearing of the lower spindle, while the internal geared faceplate shown in the engraving is furnished as an extra and gives a ratio ...
-Special Lathes. Part 4
The pulley to be turned is forced on a mandrel or arbor and held between centers in the usual way for obtaining good concentric work. As to the method of driving the pulley, there is an equalizing fac...
-Special Lathes. Part 5
The outside grinder for general work is clamped directly upon the tool-slide and has a vertical screw adjustment. It is arranged so that an emery wheel can be used on either end, and there is a taper ...
-Chapter XX. Regular Turret Lathes
Importance of the turret lathe. Its sphere of usefulness. Classification of turret lathes. Special turret lathes. The monitor lathes. The Jones & Lamson flat turret lathe. Its general design and const...
-Regular Turret Lathes. Part 2
The indexing mechanism of the turret is of the greatest importance, and in this particular point the flat turret lathe seems to have an exceptional advantage. Its index pin is located directly under t...
-Regular Turret Lathes. Part 3
Two sets of independent adjustable stops are provided for each face of the turret, one operating with the longitudinal and the other with the cross travel of the carriage. When the general work which ...
-Regular Turret Lathes. Part 4
Another notable machine brought out by the Pratt & Whitney is their 3 x 36 turret lathe; that is, a lathe capable of handling a 3-inch bar of round stock and in which the turret has a run of 36 inches...
-Regular Turret Lathes. Part 5
To give the jaws a uniform gripping pressure upon the work, regardless of the variation in size from standard, provision is made for first bringing them into contact with the bar by operating a lever,...
-Regular Turret Lathes. Part 6
The carriage is provided with a turret tool-post carrying four tools, any one of which may be instantly brought into position for cutting. These tools are independently adjustable as to height. The cr...
-Chapter XXI. Special Turret Lathes
The R. K. Le Blond triple-geared turret lathe. General description. The Springfield Machine Tool Company's 24-inch engine lathe with a turret on the bed. Its special features. Its general dimensions. ...
-Special Turret Lathes. Part 2
These figures will give a good idea of the substantial design of this device, which was evidently intended for heavy work and hard usage. It is very important that all parts of a turret, of whatever k...
-Special Turret Lathes. Part 3
The turret is very heavy and well supported by the turret slide, upon which it is pivoted, and a long base slide or saddle. It is run forward and back by a capstan or pilot wheel with long levers givi...
-Special Turret Lathes. Part 4
The top slide is square gibbed and adjusted by a taper gib. The turret base is securely clamped in any position on the bed by two eccentric clamps operated by a wrench from the front of the turret. T...
-Chapter XXII. Electrically Driven Lathes
System of electric drives. Principal advantages of driving lathes by electricity. Group drive versus individual motor system. Individual motor drives preferable for medium and large sized lathes. The ...
-Electrically Driven Lathes. Part 2
A mechanical reverse is provided and may be operated from the carriage of the lathe so that the operator can start, stop, and reverse the direction of the spindle without stopping the motor. This is a...
-Electrically Driven Lathes. Part 3
At the front end of the plate there is carried a short-throw cam which allows the plate a slight drop and consequent loosening of the belt when it is desired to shift from one step of the cone to anot...
-Chapter XXIII. Practical Instructions On Lathe Operation
Setting up a Lathe. Placing the Lathe. Plan of Small Shop. Line Shaft Size and Speed. Power Needed to Drive Lathes. Leveling Lathe. Lubrication of Lathe Parts. When to Oil. Attaching Face Plate or Chu...
-Lubrication Of Lathe Parts
To secure proper results from a lathe or other machine tool it is necessary to keep all working parts properly lubricated as the neglect of this essential precaution means rapid depreciation of the va...
-Lathe Parts And Their Functions
The main parts of a typical screw cutting lathe are clearly shown in Fig. 318. The view at A is from the end showing screw cutting and feed gears, that at B is a front view showing the parts convenien...
-Starting The Lathe
Before starting to do any work on the lathe, it is important to become familiar with the method of working the various control levers and wheels and of locking the adjustments to prevent movement when...
-Simple Lathe Accessories
The lathe may be used to do almost any work that other machine tools can do if supplied with the proper attachments. Drilling, grinding, milling and boring may be accurately performed by using various...
-Turning A Steel Shaft
The simplest thing to do on a lathe and one that will give the apprentice opportunity to become thoroughly familiar with all levers, etc., is turning a steel shaft. The various forms of lathe tools av...
-Drilling In The Lathe
A lathe may be used as a horizontal drilling machine and both sensitive and large drill presses are really developments of the lathe. The drill press is a vertical lathe without any provision for moun...
-Taper Attachment For Lathes
The common method of turning a taper on a piece in a lathe is described in Chapter XIV (Lathe Work Continued) and is very easily done. The tail stock is set off center a sufficient distance to give th...
-Milling In The Lathe
A number of milling attachments for use with the lathe have been offered, some of which are very practical, others that are not so good. A carefully designed and well constructed attachment of this na...
-Knurling On The Lathe
Knurling is very easily accomplished on any lathe if the right tools are available. The illustration, Fig. 328-A, shows a piece of steel with three different grades of knurling. The knurling tool for ...
-Indicators And Their Use
The old and almost universally used method of trueing up work in a lathe chuck or when held on centers by using a piece of chalk to indicate the high spots is only good for the first adjustment of rou...
-Boring Bar Construction And Use
The lathe is often used for boring, or internal turning and is as well adapted for that class of work as it is for the plainer and easier external work. The simpler operations of boring, such as holes...
-Special Methods Of Holding Work
While it is not difficult to chuck pieces of regular form or to secure them to the lathe face plate, there are many machining operations that call for special methods of holding the work, especially o...
-How Swing Of Lathe May Be Increased
In a small shop where the possible investment in machinery is limited, many expedients are followed to fit machines to work for which they were not primarily intended. One of the conditions often conf...
-Lathes For Heavy Work
Some of the refinements of detail noted in the Lodge & Shipley lathes for heavy cuts are shown at Fig. 335 as being of interest to the student of lathe construction. A light bridge will answer for lig...
-Grinding Attachments For Lathe
In the absence of a grinding machine many repair shops complete repairs by boring and turning, when a fine degree of accuracy would be advisable. Many owners of small shops do not care to go to the ex...
-Machining Concave And Convex Surfaces
Considerable ingenuity is displayed by automobile repairmen in overcoming various machining difficulties, and an instance of a useful lathe attachment is described in a current issue of the Commercial...
-Grooving Oil Ducts on Lathe
Cutting oil grooves in bearings with a chisel is not always a satisfactory method and considerable time is lost in the operation. The proper method is to utilize an oil grooving machine, but these are...
-Use Of Combination Lathe Dogs
Sometimes in the overhaul it is found that the crankpin is worn oval and will not yield to ordinary methods, and when such is the case a light cut is taken. The Strasburger Manufacturing Company is ma...
-Hacksaw Attachment For Lathes
A simple power hacksaw attachment that can be used in connection with this versatile machine tool is shown at Fig. 341 and its utility in the small shop where such a device does not form part of the r...







TOP
previous page: Art And Education In Wood-Turning | by William W. Klenke
  
page up: Woodworking Books
  
next page: Bench Work In Wood | by W. F. M. Goss