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Sleep Psychologically Considered With Reference To Sensation And Memory | by Blanchard Fosgate



In publishing the following Essay, the author is aware that the philosophy of mind has been the theme of gifted intellects through all civilized periods, and that, varied as its phases are, they have each elicited the closest investigation. The work is therefore submitted with great deference to the public. The reader will bear in mind that the subjects of the several chapters have not been examined with a view to their perfect history or phenomena, but have been introduced, more especially, with reference to the particular views proposed in the Introduction. In each, the leading object has been to collect facts and analyse combinations, the more clearly to elucidate, and the more perfectly to illustrate the view taken of that portion of psychology under consideration

TitleSleep Psychologically Considered With Reference To Sensation And Memory
AuthorBlanchard Fosgate
PublisherGeorge P. Putnam
Year1850
Copyright1850, George P. Putnam
AmazonSleep Psychologically Considered with Reference to Sensation and Memory

"For the soul never slumbereth, but is as the eye of the Eternal, And mind, the breath of God, knoweth not ideal vacuity: At night, after weariness and watching, the body sinketh into sleep, But the mental eye is awake, and thou reasonest in thy dreams: In a dream thou mayst live a lifetime, and all be forgotten in the morning."

Tupper.

By Blanchard Fosgate, M.D., Physician to the New York State Prison at Auburn.

-Introduction
The phenomena of sleep have engaged the speculative and philosophic consideration of psychologists from the earliest periods. And although deep-searching investigation has made no approximation toward...
-Chapter I. Nervous And Mental Action. Sensation And Perception
To sustain the views proposed in our introduction it becomes necessary briefly to treat of nervous and mental action, of association, and in some measure of deranged mental manifestation. It will be r...
-Reflex Action
Another mode of nervous action, but having less dependence on the brain than those just considered, is termed reflex. This action is a peculiar function, of the spinal cord, and prolongs, the natural ...
-Consensual Or Associate Action
Consensual or associate muscular action consists in the contraction of a single muscle of a particular set being followed by a determinate movement of the others, independent of, and oftentimes contra...
-Mental Action
Mental action does not consist of light, or sound, or touch; for none of these existences reach the brain: but of ideas originating from the stimulus of perception acting upon the mental organ. Out of...
-Deranged Mental Operation
Deranged mental operations depend more upon an exalted condition of the propensities and sentiments, than upon external appliances. When the mind is thus excited, impressions received through the exte...
-Rapidity Of Mental Action
The astonishing rapidity with which the mind acts, and the almost unlimited power of expansion with which it is endowed under certain circumstances, is of peculiar interest. The conditions best adapte...
-Chapter II. Sleep
Gall says, sleep is merely the inactivity, the perfect repose of the brain in health. During this suspension of the cerebral functions, the brain acquires new force, and on awaking, its functions tak...
-Sleep. Continued
Constitutionally some individuals require but very little sleep. Bonaparte, Pichegru, and Scipio may be mentioned among many others, in whom the recuperative energy of the system was sufficient to res...
-Stages Of Sleep
To present a more perfect view of the phenomena of sleep, it will be necessary to examine its several stages in detail, and from the facts presented, to draw such conclusions as the premises will just...
-Slumber
Slumber is that condition, when the mind is less connected than usual by the organs of external sensation with surrounding objects, and when volition is occupied in producing a more complete separatio...
-Dreaming
The stage of dreaming is characterized by the perfect closure of one or more of the avenues of special sense. When this occurs, the harmony between the world and ourselves is broken. The mind is no lo...
-Dreaming. Part 2
Dr. Parr says, In dreams we seem to reason, to argue, to compose; and in all these circumstances during sleep, we are highly gratified, and think we excel. If, however, we remember our dreams, our re...
-Dreaming. Part 3
In this case the dream may have depended in part upon internal sensations, but the intense excitement probably produced phantasms which impressed it so vividly upon the memory; for although he had not...
-Dreaming. Part 4
In treating the subject of dreams, one class of philosophers believe the mind to be under the influence of good and evil spirits, and that as one or the other of these invisible attendants gains ascen...
-Dreaming. Part 5
Sensational hallucinations and waking dreams do not properly belong to the subject of sleep; they are a species of monomania, and probably arise from organic derangement. When the mind is so riveted u...
-Torpor
The stage of torpor begins when the external senses are in abeyance. It has been supposed by many psychologists, that during sound sleep the mind is dormant. This view is based upon the fact, that as...
-Chapter III. Mesmerism
Animal Magnetism, as connected with the phenomena of sleep, is not only interesting as a matter of metaphysical speculation, but of great importance in the illustration of our subject. In truth, sleep...
-Mesmerism. Part 2
Since witnessing this exhibition, we have attended many others of pretty much the same character. We have more lately examined a clairvoyant case. The subject was a young man about twenty-five years o...
-Mesmerism. Part 3
(after his being mesmerized) and never felt any pain at all; I once felt as if I heard a kind of crounching.' He was asked if that was painful; he replied; 'No pain at all. I never had any; and knew n...
-Chapter IV. Somnambulism
Somnambulic sleep is one of the most extraordinary and unaccountable anomalies of our nature. The almost endless variety of mental and physical combinations it presents; the adaptation and precision o...
-Somnambulism. Part 2
Pigatti says that Negretti sat down to eat a bowl of salad which he had prepared. It was taken from him, and some strongly seasoned cabbage put in its place; this he eat without perceiving the differ...
-Somnambulism. Part 3
Dendy says - In a Gazette of Augsburg I have read this sad story: 'Dresden was the theatre of a melancholy spectacle on the 29th ult. As early as seven in the morning, a female was seen walking on th...
-Sleep Psychologically Considered
She had these periodic spells of preaching for five or six years, every two weeks regularly, never having missed but two or three times. The case having attracted much attention, Dr. B. was induced t...
-Chapter V. Incubus
Sleep, with an overpowering influence, wraps us into forgetfulness of ourselves. It envelopes in its sombre drapery, the votaries of pleasure and the subjects of sorrow. A helpless - inanimate - uncon...
-Incubus. Continued
This disease we consider to be purely nervous. The attendant dyspnoea and congestion are its consequent, and not the cause, as has been believed and supported by pathologists. But before proceeding fu...
-Chapter VI. Trance
It is not our intention to examine the causes of trance, much less to give a detailed history of this singular affection; but for the purpose of showing the connexion between sensation and memory, it ...
-Trance. Part 2
Nicolai relates this case as a species of catalepsy, and Dr. Binns says, It is, more correctly speaking, one of trance. We think it was not catalepsy, because the senses received and conveyed impr...
-Trance. Part 3
Singular and distressing affair: - A highly respectable gentleman of Baltimore city, who transacted a mercantile business on the wharf, was taken sick and died, as was supposed, a short time since. B...
-Chapter VII. Catalepsy
It is not our purpose to give a detailed account of catalepsy: this would be foreign to the objects of this work; but we shall treat it only as a collateral branch of our subject. The distinction, how...
-Catalepsy. Part 2
These unequivocal cataleptic symptoms were succeeded by a development of the integrity of the mental organs, while separated from surrounding objects by the obliteration (for the time being) of the ex...
-Catalepsy. Part 3. Conclusion
To establish with greater certainty the doctrines, that the mind is absolutely sleepless; and that we are dependent on external sensation for a remembrance of what passes in the mind in somnolency; it...
-Catalepsy. Part 4
A visitor's remarks upon the venerable statesman, John Q. Adams, then 81 years of age, appear appropriate to our subject. I found him, he says, much reduced in strength and activity, from what he ...
-Catalepsy. Part 5
Eliza Bullard - our patient - aged fifteen years, by birth a French Canadian, of a bilio-nervous temperament, was suddenly seized with convulsions, which continued at intervals for about six weeks. Th...







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