Quagga, a species of zebra, belonging to the asinine division of the horse family, and to the genus asinus as defined by Gray, characterized by a tail furnished with long hair only at the tip, the absence of horny warts on the hind legs, and a short and upright mane. The quagga (A. quagga, Gray) is about 4 ft. high at the shoulders; the neck and anterior parts of the body are dark brown, elegantly striped with broad black bands; the rest of the body paler brown, belly and legs white; a dark median line on the back extending to the tail. This beautiful species associates in large herds with the gnu and ostrich, but not with other zebras, on the plains of S. Africa, and is rarely found north of the Gariep or Orange river; it is the most horse-like in structure of any of the group, having the form, light figure, and small head and ears of the horse, with the tail of the ass; Buff on regarded it as a hybrid between a horse and a zebra. It is swift, and rather shy in its native state, strong, robust, and bold when attacked by hyaenas or dogs; the voice resembles a barking neigh more than a bray, and has given to the animal the Hottentot name of quagga.

It is the most easily domesticated of the zebras, and is docile, generally good-natured, and obedient, but disposed to kick at the sight of a dog. Its flesh, though coarse, is eaten by natives and hunters.

Quagga (Asinus quagga).

Quagga (Asinus quagga).