See Annelida, Earthworm, Entozoa, Hair Worm, Leech, Nereids, Planarians, and Ribbon Worm.

Worms #1

Worms, a city of the grand duchy of Hesse, Germany, on the left bank of the Rhine, 26 m. S. S. E. of Mentz; pop. in 1871, 14,484, comprising about 9,000 Protestants, 4,000 Catholics, and 1,000 Jews. The streets are exceedingly crooked. Worms has a Byzantine cathedral with four towers, begun in the 8th century and completed in the 12th. Prominent among the other churches is the Gothic Liebfrauenkirche, which gives name to the famous Liebfrauenmilch wine, produced in its vicinity. The synagogue dates from the 11th century. Worms has much trade, and manufactories of polished leather, cigars, and other articles. - It is one of the oldest of German cities, and was the scene of the Nibelungenlied, which begins by telling how King Giinther in Worms reigned over the Burgundians. (See Nibelungenlied.) The Romans had a station here. Attila destroyed the city, and Clovis rebuilt it. Charlemagne and his successors occasionally resided here. Under the German empire it was successively ruled by local counts and by the dukes of Francbnia. It subsequently became a free imperial city, and many diets of the empire were held here. In 1495, under Maximilian, the "eternal peace " was here decreed.

Here also took place Luther's memorable declaration before Charles V. and his first diet, April 18, 1521. Under the Hohenstaufen the population reached 60,000, and at the close of the thirty years' war it still numbered 30,000. In 1689 it was burned by the French. An offensive treaty ( Wormser Trahtat) was concluded here Sept. 17, 1743, between England, Maria Theresa as queen of Hungary, and Sardinia. The city suffered much in the early period of the wars of the French revolution. The ancient see of Worms (pop. 20,000) was by the treaty of Luneville (1801) mostly given to France, and one fourth of it on the right bank of the Rhine to Hesse-Darmstadt, the whole reverting in 1814 to the latter country. The colossal monument of Luther, with the figures of the principal reformers and of the cities of Spire, Magdeburg, and Augsburg, was, after Rietschel's death in 1861, completed by Donndorf and Kietz, and unveiled June 25, 1868.

Worms Cathedral.

Worms Cathedral.