Caraway, the fruit or seeds of the carum carui, a small biennial plant of the family um-belliferm, which grows wild in the meadows and pastures of central and northern Europe, and is cultivated in gardens, as it is in this country. The root, which in the cultivated plant resembles the parsnip, is used for food in the north of Europe. The seeds mature the second year of the growth of the plant. They are used in confectionery, to flavor liquors and cakes, and also bread, cheese, and other articles of food. Their medicinal action is to stimulate the digestive organs, and remove flatulency; they are used also to aid or modify the action of other medicines. An essential oil, oleum cari, is prepared by distillation of the seeds, which possesses their properties, and is used to flavor medicines, and to correct their nauseating and griping effects. Caraway seed is imported from Europe, and is also supplied in part from our own gardens. It is largely cultivated in Essex and Suffolk, England.

Caraway.

Caraway.